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Comment Re:People like Musk need to do more homework (Score 1) 87

> Smart growth and sustainable, walkable, transit-oriented development...

Transit-oriented development is exactly what is being proposed. From the fine summary:

"[The system would contain] electric skates transporting cars in a narrow tunnel, then raising them back to street level in a space as small as two parking spaces... cars could travel as fast as 200 kilometers per hour [through the tunnel.]"

This is a subway for cars, which is _exactly_ the sort of short-to-medium-term fix that you need in a metro area that is obscenely car-heavy, has next-to-no underground rail system, and next-to-no political will for constructing one.

Musk understands the political realities on the ground in the LA metro area far, far better than you do.

Bollocks. An underground train/elevator for cars is way less efficient than building a city where people can walk from point to point.

Comment People like Musk need to do more homework (Score 5, Insightful) 87

Solutions like this are classic examples of tech-rich people thinking they have all the answers when there's a whole bank of qualified specialist people already working in that field who know what's really needed to fix the problem but have only been stymied by politics.

If traffic is driving Musk nuts then the solution is not to find innovative new ways to handle more traffic. The solution is to ask why is traffic so bad in the first place.

Recommended reading: The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jacobs

Or if that's too heavy, try Suburban Nation: The rise of sprawl and the decline of the American dream.

Only then will you come to see the culprit: Single Use Zoning, aka the BANANA (Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anything) rules. Single-use zoning forces everybody to make several car journeys just to get through a typical day. Going to work? Car. Going out for lunch? Car. Going home form work? Car. Need to go out for a bottle of milk and postage stamp? Car. Going to a movie? Car.

No bloody wonder the place is flooded with traffic. You try to build a city around the automobile and it becomes a hostile environment for pedestrians and cyclists. You try to widen roads to accommodate more cars and the laws of induced demand kick in, resulting in even more traffic and roads as choked as they were before.

Learn a few things about urban planning, Elon. Don't arrogantly assume that you're the first person to want to address this problem. Smart growth and sustainable, walkable, transit-oriented development is a far better solution than drilling holes in the ground and cracking puns about the word "boring." It requires years of tedious work and politicking to build support for smart growth. A city is not a private company with which you can do what you like. There are elected councils, public advisory committees, public hearings, tax implications, and all manner of complex bureaucratic hoops that you have to jump through to fix these things.

Comment Re:Too much work (Score 1) 8

But at some point their own electorate will notice how staggeringly little they have accomplished with all the power.

Judging by history, that's one hell of a theoretical point far far into the future. Remember: abortion is still legal, gays can marry, and there was a black dude in the White House and conservatives keep voting Republican.

Comment Re:Too much work (Score 1) 8

Every once in a while - like every fucking day? It's hard to find a day that some conservative talking head isn't saying something derogatory about either Hillary or President Lawnchair.

Still cheaper than investigations and hearings, y'know, actual work.

If the democrats had a spine between them they would start calling out the GOP on neglecting the legacies of the people who died that night. Flag as Inappropriate

That is one bizarre sentence. You actually want them wasting their time just like you complained about the GOP doing?

Comment Re:People really need to educate themselves... (Score 1) 267

I had a similar experience recently, but with diabetes: three months ago blood glucose was 310-450, A1C 10.5. I've yet to do my second fasting test (playing phone tag with doctor's office) but according to my Accu-Chek Connect cloud service, I've been under 160 for two weeks and my A1C should be in the 5.5 range now.

Metformin and a paleo diet is what did it.

What a shock it will be next week when I finally get that 2nd blood test and go to see my insurance company's required diabetic support group for the first time.

Comment Re:AKA "snowflake syndrome" (Score 1) 180

Let me guess, they were expected to be productive members of the team and not just the token minority, and that got to be too much for them, so they quit rather than be fired for incompetence.

Quoted for visiblity - thats not mere flamebait.

However, I wonder if the truth lies elsewhere: some people are smart enough to realize how badly the industry in general treats developers, and just pick a better line of work.

Comment Re:EE Degree (Score 1) 194

Yes, immutable objects are over-emphasized right now as the essence of good programming, from what I've seen. Still, it's nice to see recognition of the value of that style outside of functional programming. It's a shame none of the current mainstream languages have "const and not null" as the default for all declarations - I think the programming world with be a better place if you had to explicitly declare something either mutable or nullable.

Comment Re:Company's Fault (Score 5, Insightful) 180

White male here.

Coincidentally, I left my last 2 jobs for the exact same reason (perceived mistreatment). I think it is a 'thing', and not just for protected classes.

That's why people leave their jobs. Were they expecting to hear, "I just lost interest in my job?"

No...people don't say that. They blame the job, and those assholes they left behind.

Comment Re:Speaking of delays... (Score 1) 103

ULA's track record with the Atlas V: 100%

Yes, let's take one vehicle in its fifth generation (not counting subrevisions), and ignore its track record with all of its earlier versions that led up to this point and all of their failures, and all of Lockheed and Boeings' other launch vehicles over time, with all of their failures. Lets also ignore that they're going to have to switch engines soon, to an engine with zero track record.

Payloads typically launch on schedule or within a few weeks. .... Some payloads have been waiting literally years due to delays.

Let's totally ignore that Atlas V launches once per two months, while SpaceX launches once per month, and that almost all of the wait time was due to investigation backlog. When it comes to hitting launch windows, SpaceX has a higher average success rate than average than Atlas V

And lets entirely fail to mention the point that ULA charges nearly double what SpaceX does per kilogram. Or that SpaceX is doing everything while rapidly evolving its rocket, to the point that they've basically even switched propellants partway through (denisification radically changes their properties). And while at the same time running an aggressive recovery and refurbishment programme and developing a heavy lift vehicle, with a small fraction as much capital.

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