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Comment Re:Handy guide to licenses (Score 1) 336

GPL and BSD are both free as in speech, but the question is "for who?"

GPL maximizes freedom for the users -- nothing can take away their control over the code running on their computer.

BSD maximizes freedom for developers -- they can do whatever they want with it, including close it up and sell it.

Comment Re:Rules for thee, not for me (Score 1) 206

Hey dumbass, maybe it's true that "it's almost never RICO," but the key word is "almost" and this case actually could fit the definition.

From your own goddamn link:

To win, a plaintiff would have to prove (1) conduct, (2) of an enterprise, (3) through a pattern, (4) of racketeering activity called "predicate acts," (5) causing injury to the plaintiffâ(TM)s "business or property."

  • (1) the executives and management of Getty Images, Inc. manage the enterprise Getty Images, Inc. Obviously.
  • (2) Getty Images, Inc. is an enterprise. That's what the "Inc." part in the name means, so again -- obviously.
  • (3) Other people in this thread have mentioned Morel v. Getty, and a site on which I read about that case (that I can't be bothered to cite; deal with it) listed several other previous instances of Getty Images, Inc.'s similar conduct. That's a pattern.
  • (4) Getty Images, Inc. is extorting payment from innocent people based on bogus claims of copyright infringement. Extortion is "racketeering activity" as defined in 18 U.S. Code ss. 1961 (1) A.
  • (5) The racketeering is causing damage to Highsmith's professional reputation, which is part of her "business or property." It's also costing her money, which is obviously property.

So there you go: RICO Act violations. QED, asshole!

Comment Re:uMatrix or RequestPolicy Continued (Score 1) 152

Care to offer up the advantages/reasons for RequestPolicy Continued rather then RequestPolicy?

RequestPolicy Continued is under active development, while the original RequestPolicy has been abandoned by its author.

Also, RequestPolicy Continued allows you to block or unblock several domains at once without having to exit the menu and reload the page each time.

Comment Re:dark patterns huh? (Score 1) 119

Is it any wonder that UX designers are getting a horrible reputation among some segments of the tech-savvy crowd?

The main reason for this is that people who self-describe as UX experts, as opposed to HCI experts, tend to be the ones that favour form over function and ignore the last 40 or so years of research into how to design useable interfaces. Most of them wouldn't know Fitts' Law if it dragged them to the corner of the screen and made them infinitely long.

Comment Re:Been that way for a while (Score 1) 169

Step 1: Invent some shitty cell phone nobody cares about.
Step 2: Sell shitty cellphone design to Apple Ireland for $1.
Step 3: Lease back shitty cellphone design for 99.9% of the revenue.
Step 4: Design not so shitty, sells a billion phones, pays 99.9% of the revenue to Apple Ireland.
Step 5: No profit after licenses and other expenses.

You lost me between step 3 and 4, how did the design go from shitty to not so shitty, sells a billion? You appear to be saying that the mere act of leasing it from Ireland transforms shit to gold.

I think you need to check your assumptions, but if you're right then you really should figure out if your steps for going from shitty to sells a billion can be applied to anything other than phones.

Comment Re:How do you regression test that stuff? (Score 1) 306

There isn't much testing of the C bindings. They're also in the process of being deprecated in favour of machine-generated ones that are less API stable and have no ABI stability guarantees (precisely because most people don't actually use them from C, they use them from some other language with C bindings). For everything else, there's a bit regression test suite that works by feeding some code (source code when testing clang, IR or assembly when testing bits of LLVM) into one of the tools and then checking that the output matches. Bugs still slip in quite easily, unfortunately. The second tier of tests involves compiling and running a bunch of benchmarks and similar sample code and checking that they haven't got slower (by a statistically significant margin) and that they still produce the right answers. There's a network of buildbots that runs on a variety of operating systems and architectures that first builds and runs the regression test suite on every commit and then (less frequently) runs the executable tests. These catch most regressions, but not all - the rest are caught by users testing betas and filing bug reports.

There's been a lot of research work on improving this. The LLVM Miscompilation Detector, for example, had a semantic model of LLVM IR and would feed real and randomly-generated IR through the optimisation pipeline and then use a theorem prover to attempt to prove that the semantics of the before and after versions were the same. This could then be combined with the LLVM bugpoint tool to find the optimisation pass that performed an invalid transform.

Comment Re:As a C programmer (Score 1) 306

It's a tradeoff. Blowing away the i-cache is a good way of killing performance, but so is having a load of function calls that do almost no work. If you had to do a virtual method call for comparing two unsigned integers and a different virtual function call for comparing two signed integers when inserting them into a set then you'd have a lot more overhead. In a typical std::set implementation, the compare operations are inlined and so the costs are very low.

The real problem with C++ is that the programmer has to make the decision about whether to use static or dynamic dispatch up front and the syntax for both is very different, so you can't trivially switch between them when it makes sense to do so.

Comment Pretty lame as far as scandal material goes. (Score 2) 164

If you want to see Democrats sniping at each others' candidates or complaining about what the party's up to, just go on any Democratic blog.

It's not a scandal. It's not a secret. It's not even a problem -- not even when people get hot under the collar and start acting like assholes. George Washington was elected unanimously by the Electoral College, but in every election since then politics has been turning Americans into assholes.

And that is a good thing. You can't make politics 100% civil without pushing out unpopular opinions.

Comment Re:Absurd Pile (Score 1) 999

OK, there are a lot of strange arguments you've made, but I have to get running soon. So here goes:

This is why I rank Woodrow Wilson as the worst US President of All Time: He really put into practice this idea that "Europe's problems are America's problems", and it's saturated the minds of Americans ever since.

Unfortunately it didn't. We stood by for two years while Hitler took over almost all of Europe, and it took Pearl Harbor to crack through our isolationism.

Your assertion that an Atlantic Wall is enough to protect us also makes me suspect that you're forgetting what happened in WWII.

The Russians are deeply pragmatic. What would they have to gain by annexing the Baltic states?

Russia just invaded Ukraine in 2014. What did they have to gain in that case? I hate to send you to a George Will article but it popped up in my first Google search and I have to go now.

Comment Re:As a C programmer (Score 1) 306

Yepp,
but regardless if you write to a buffer in memory, and read it back, or a buffer on disk: you only do the work twice :D
And don't let me dig into the mysteries of memory mapped files ...

John Wulff is an old friend of mine, the oldest programmer I know in person, approaching 80 years now. Worked with plenty of famous people.

For some reason I thought "we" might have missed the fact that "we" are "both" on /.

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