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Comment Re:Most of the alternatives he describes... (Score 1) 126

>does not seem to require to the latest internet fad app in order to work.

Telegraph was good enough for my grandfather, and it's good enough for me.

OK, so it takes a while to read these articles, and the bandwith is even lower than an 1149 connection, but . . .

hawk

p.s. My grandfather delivered Herbert Hoover's telegram offering him the party nomination. My father has Mrs. Hoover's thank you note to him . . .

Comment Re:Some privacy is more equal than other (Score 2) 202

I have had this very thought for many years now.

A close friend had an aneurysm years back, but who was revived (though never resuscitated). In order to remove him from life support, the hospital was required by law to do an EEG to try to detect alpha waves (and thus consciousness, by definition). The test came back negative, and his family helped him to pass on.

I have wondered since what the feasibility would be of running such a test on a foetus to determine the presence of consciousness. This would seem a logical and scientific way to remove the philosophy/religion from the debate altogether and allow everyone to move on.

Comment Re:Scottish independence (Score 2) 508

Without England, Scotland has nothing to offer the EU except liability.

Scotland is small ,but it has a higher per capita GDP than England, or the entire UK for that matter -- if you count North Sea energy. Scotland as an independent country would be the twelfth largest economy in Europe and almost exactly in the middle of the pack for size in the EU.

Now logically speaking Scottish independence from an independent UK does not necessarily equate to EU membership. Scots could choose independence from the UK on the basis that union with a UK that is not in the EU is not as attractive as union with a UK that is in the EU.

Comment Re: Internet Rape (Score 1) 503

Whatever you think, Trump is either the cure or the symptom. He is not the disease, and he is not part of the problem.

What? Of course he is. He is not the whole disease, but he is part of the disease. Think of THE PROBLEM (greed) like HIV. It attacks the immune system and makes you susceptible to other illnesses (Clinton, Trump, etc.)

Trump is a hypocrite. What more do you really need to know?

Comment Re: Jayavel Murugan...Syed Nawaz (Score 1) 242

Not at all necessary or useful. There are a number of ways to streamline regulations without compromising quality (hint, it involves removing corruption, ossified bureaucracy, and sweetheart IP restrictions). The U.K. spends 1/4 what the U.S. does per capita and gets better outcomes than we do. It has been done, therefore it can be done.

One means would be single payer. There's a lot of bargaining power to be had when you represent 300 million people.

Comment Re:I'll document it tomorrow (Score 1) 511

I find that whenever I try to set a hard, fast programming rule, I find side cases where I honestly probably should break it. It doesn't matter what the rule is about - spacing, line wrapping, what belongs in a class vs. a standalone function, what files to put various pieces of code... whatever rule I make, I find cases where it probably would be better for me not to follow it.

The same happens with comments. I'm very much in the school of long, descriptive function names and variables that are self-commenting. I hate coming across old, outdated comments that no longer apply to the code; with long, descriptive variable and function names, you can read what's happening and it's always up to date. And often that's enough. The code says what it's doing, it's straightforward... job done.

But that's not always enough. Because it's one thing to say what's happening. But it's another thing to say "why". When was the last time you put the word "because" in a variable or function name? That's what comments should be for. Not what you're doing, but why you're doing it. Sometimes code just needs descriptive variable and function names. But sometimes you really need the "why" explained.

Comment Re:I'll document it tomorrow (Score 1) 511

Or the more annoying:


void fn193(dt_1011 a)
{
/* BEGIN FUNCTION */

/* IF a is greater than 5 THEN*/
    if (a > 5)
    {
/* Loop 10 times */
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
/* Call fn828 with arguments a and i */
            fn828(a, i);
        }
/* end IF statement */
    }
/* end FOR loop */

...

/* END FUNCTION */
}

.... without ever having mentioned why they're doing any of it. Yes, someone who used to work here actually programmed like that. A comment on almost every line, and none of them at all useful. :P

They did sometimes have function headers. Unfortunately they were mostly cargo-cult style copies, full of meaningless cruft and long-outdated information, and... it almost hurts me to say this... doublespaced. ;)

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