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Comment Re:Well Trump has one thing right (Score 1) 527

What complete and utter shite are you spewing?

Actual experience of my wife with H1-B employees (including the "chagrined when discovering the forged credentials" case).

When getting your H1-B you need to provide documentation from your university as proof of your degree. The university must be on a list recognized by the US government. They validate the information with the university rather than just rubberstamping it.

Any of the following would explain that:
  - The agency faked the references, too.
  - The government didn't do the validation you claim it does in every case.
  - The government doesn't do the validation you claim and you're talking through your hat.

Please put your flamage aside for the moment and give us a reference to documentation showing that the government officials actually check credentials, rather than doing spot-checks or taking the applicant's word for them (or bribes).

Comment pooh. (Score 1) 146

Assuming you believe lie detector results, it sounds like they were just measuring how honest the participants were about how many naughty words they new. And from that perspective it goes without saying that there would be a correlation between being honest and reporting more words.

Also, as regards holding back on the actual use of naughty words (which, BTW, they didn't measure), they need to consider the difference between "dishonesty" and "manners".

Comment Credit card chargeback. (Score 3, Informative) 70

Go to your card provider (Visa/MC/Discover/Amex) and tell them to remove the charge because the service was not rendered and/or the charge was improper.

They will.

Once AT&T starts getting a lot of chargebacks, they will do something about it.

I had this sort of thing happen do me years back in NYC with Verizon. I called to cancel, was given a confirmation # and everything, and was still billed again the next month. When called again, furious, the manager I was escalated to said that they could not offer a refund because they did not have that policy. I said I don't care about policy, give me a refund, and he said there was literally no way for him to do that in the system and suggested (of course) that I accept the service for a month, since I'd already paid for it, and then if I didn't want it next month, I could call and cancel [n.b. AGAIN] then.

I hung up on him, dialed Visa, and had them charge it back. Of course THAT got Verizon's attention and a day or two later I was called by retention or some similar department to offer me a discount if I would stay on, along with a lot of apology garbage.

I told them I'd rather eat a bug.

Comment Needed environment for me is 7, 7pro, 8, 8.1 only (Score 1) 424

Meanwhile Win 3.11... Is still running fine on test equipment. The manufacturer says do not upgrade to any other version of Windows.

I have a gang-programming-and-testing production tool from one of the top three (or so) manufacturers of BLE systems-on-a-chip. Our startup needs this (or a suitable alternative) to go into volume production of our initial products.

It comes with an application - in source in a build environment. This allows it to be customized, to add tests for the peripherals added to make the final assembly, and to integrate into production processes and databases.

But the build environment is only supported in Windows 7, 7 Pro, 8, and 8.1, using Visual Studio 2012. The executables and DLLs produced run only on those or XP.

The executable/DLLs use .NET, too, and the way they use it breaks the GUI under wine, even with genuine Microsoft .NET installed. They run correctly, but the status display is corrupted in a way that makes it unusable. So at the production site it needs to run on genuine Windows at one of those levels. B-b

As of the last time I checked (a couple months ago), the manufacturer is unwilling to port to another OS or version - even though all of them (except maybe 7 Pro) have been end-of-lifed by Microsoft.

Comment Re:Dynamic Relational [Re: That's not how it works (Score 1) 217

Darwen and Date tend to be pedantic and don't focus on things shops actually care about. They spend far more time on chalkboards than in the field.

Plus, SQL, or a variant of it, can be adjusted to fit most of their complaints. That would be more practical than entirely throwing out an established standard and starting over again from scratch.

Again, I have gripes about SQL also, but something typically has to be significantly better to replace a standard, not merely somewhat better. And the SQL standard can be adjusted and expanded as new actual lessons are learned.

Comment Re:If irreversible, why not let it continue natura (Score 1) 319

That tax break is not for the 1% but for middle class people who could not afford an electric car without it, or wouldn't otherwise want to spend the full amount on such a vehicle. That in turn has made the market for electric cars an attractive one, where it is economically viable to design, manufacture and sell EVs in larger numbers. With the market (and infrastructure) for EVs reaching a certain critical mass, there's a huge incentive to research technologies to further drive down prices and/or increase range and efficiency. Some believe that the critical mass has already been reached, which makes further electrification "an irreversible trend." This would probably have happened without subsidies as well, but a lot later. And once the market takes off, subsidies can be decreased. In my country this is already happening; the Luxury/Pollution Tax on EVs is still 0% I believe (this tax exceeds the factory price for the more ridiculous SUVs), but companies no longer get the Small Scale Environmental Investment subsidy when they buy an EV, and the income tax payable on company cars is no longer 0% either.

Comment Re:Ha-Ha! (Score 1) 272

That goes all the way back to the telegraph where you could interrupt the sender by opening the circuit.

RS-232 maintains it in the form of the break signal which just pulls the line low for not less than one symbol's time (ass opposed to ctrl-c that just transmits character value 3).

Cut the wire is as good as any I suppose.

Comment Re:Emergency response (Score 1) 124

Helicopters? Expensive to run and they certainly cannot land everywhere. This vehicle looks like it can land in most places where there are no overhead obstructions, and if the cost can drop to where it becomes a viable mode of public transport, hospitals could replace their one helicopter with a whole fleet of these.

Comment Re:Emergency response (Score 1) 124

Self driving cars will also help alleviate congestion, when there are enough of them. They can drive bumper to bumper. At intersections they can just keep going at speed, passing each other after a short negotiation and small speed adjustment to create and time the right gaps in the flow of traffic, with the traffic lights turned off. (The traffic light would need to be smart as well; it would turn on again when a manually driven vehicle approaches)

Comment Re:Should have gone with blackberry... (Score 1) 66

BYOD isn't a cost-saver, it's a matter of convenience. And playing on private phones has nothing to do with it (so sick and tired of that old "Blackberry is a business tool; iPhone / Android is a toy"-line).

Most employees prefer using their private phones for work stuff over having to carry a second phone, and BYOD can also be offered to employees who formerly did not qualify for a company phone. For a while, having a BB was something of a status symbol, but as soon as companies figured out how to make BYOD secure enough, most people got rid of them even if they didn't have to. The hold-outs who kept their BBs were seen as dinosaurs. The "current state of affairs" at places that did BYOD the right way is just fine and dandy.

Comment Re:In other news (Score 1) 66

Most of my clients that implemented this saw BYOD as a win-win: they no longer have to provide company phones, and most employees seem to prefer using their private phone for business stuff (and bearing the costs as well) over having to carry 2 phones. In case where the employee had a choice between a company phone or BYOD, almost everyone ditched their Blackberry and used their personal device instead. And it certainly was seen as a win by employees who did not qualify for a company phone, but now have access to their work email, agenda, directory and IM service.

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