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Comment Re: Taste Score (Score 2) 85

Liver tastes like something that spent a lifetime filtering out crap for a reason, kidneys taste like they've been marinated in piss, etc).

Organ meats contain the highest nutritional value, actually.

These statements are not mutually exclusive. Organ meats have a high chance of contamination from environmental sources because of their function. If clean, they are highly desirable. If not, you should leave them to the sled dogs. They have shorter lifespans, and are less likely to suffer the effects of bioaccumulation.

Comment Re:The sharing of table scraps economy not viable? (Score 1) 317

Done it on a few cars, Civic, Mustang. The worst are A arms. Two bushings, in line.

Yes, that sounds like a massive PITA. I have no experience with such things. I actually let someone change my Dana 50 ball joints, the same guy doing the alignment on my F250. On my 240SX, all the suspension links were just simple stamped steel items with one thing on each end, maybe a bolt attachment in the middle (e.g. radius rod to the front suspension arm.) The bushing in the radius rod is about the size of a subframe bushing on a german luxo barge, i.e. massive. So that's going to basically last forever. On my A8, it's all cast Aluminum members, and it's all multilink so they are all simple except the main one on the bottom to which the goodies attach. So there are just no situations like that. On the other hand, there's also not a complete kit of poly bushings available for either end of the car. There's only one poly bush shy in the front, but I think there's only one bush available for the rear. On the 240SX at least you could go full-poly, except maybe the subframe where people tended to go Aluminum anyway. And I lost track of the number of Integras I blew off due to handling differences, so meh to Honda :) I went full poly front and full spherical rear, though... And kept rubber subframe bushes for street comfort.

Comment Re:The sharing of table scraps economy not viable? (Score 1) 317

I love my polyurethane. But they aren't for everyone and they don't last forever. Life is actually shorter than stock,

What? Shorter than stock? That's goofy. That outright shouldn't be happening. Did you forget to grease the bores before installing the inserts?

the ride is much better IMHO. Some people like mush...different bores and strokes for different folks. In a cab, some people would claim the car's ride was 'harsh'.

You can design the bushing for different characteristics. Right now all the offerings are solid bushings designed as ultra-durable replacements for the OE bushing, but if you design the car to use poly bushes from the beginning, you can design as much squish into them as you like.

Bushings are a bitch of a job, even with a hydraulic press. You'll need some steel stock, a band saw and welder to make a custom drift before you are done.

I use a miter saw with a grinding wheel to chop metal stock. It has kind of a wide kerf but it's not really a practical problem. You can use sockets to push poly bushings (they come in a variety of sizes and have a nice rounded edge which won't chew the bushing) and I have a pretty comprehensive set all the way from the itsy bitsy ones up through 3/4" so that provides for installation of most bushings. I also have the HF 4x4 ball joint kit, which can be used in a pinch, if clamped into a vise. My vise is mounted on a pedestal made from a Chevy astro axle shaft and brake drum. And I do have a hydraulic press. The only poly bushes I ever pressed in, though, were big ones from whiteline for the radius rod on the 240SX S13 front suspension. Maybe those were easy.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 1) 101

that would be an interesting twist: lots of new beachfront property.

As opposed to what is going to happen, which is lots of old properties become beachfront :)

Well, maybe you're right, but even if this was something of a 1970s meme, the fact was that it was at best a view held by all a minority of researchers, and even those researchers weren't proposing that Ice Age was going to happen any time soon, save perhaps in geological time.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 1) 101

It sounds more like anecdotal claims of dubious merit to me. I've suspected for several years now that posters who proclaim that they were told this by college profs were either exaggerating or simply making it up, basing it on something they read elsewhere on the Internet. As it is, even the article I mention suggests that, at the time, there were some legitimate fears that sulfur dioxide aerosols from industrial pollution could lead to cooling, but that that view was only held by a minority of climatologists, and never really seems to have been viewed by the wider scientific community as a significant issue. Fifty years ago, the research was much as it is today, that human CO2 emissions will trap more energy in the lower atmosphere and lead to surface warming. In reality, AGW is about as controversial in the scientific community as biological evolution or Big Bang cosmology.

Comment Re:The benefits of Single Payer (Score 1) 108

I can only speak to the work I've done in a fairly small project that merged multiple sources and creating a set of file formats and protocols to communicate changes. It certainly wasn't trivial even in my case, and working with vendors to create interfaces in their own applications to work with these protocols could be a challenge. I suppose in many instances with aging infrastructure, you may also be dealing with fairly old systems where finding expertise to actual build interfaces could be a problem. But the theory I was operating under is that you create a common environment that discrete systems can push to and pull from was still a lot cheaper and manageable than telling everyone involved "We're moving you over to a new system".

It seems rather odd to me, as a person who comes from a networking background, that there would be this obsession over running the identical application, or running a centralized application, in all agencies or departments, is necessary or even desirable. The world I started out my professional life in was dominated by networking protocols, whether we're talking low-level data exchange protocols like TCP/IP or NETBIOS or higher level protocols like SMTP. One never really expected that all front end applications would function the same, or possibly even do precisely the same things, but you built message-exchanging protocols, databases and file formats that captured the data and activities that could at a minimum be expected by all the front-facing high level applications, and then the only problem you might have to deal with is where one particular application didn't support all the necessary features.

This monolithic system approach just seems so very 1950s-1960s to me, and suffers the same kinds of problems that older approach often had, with too many critical failure points that would simply bring an entire system down, where having a distributed system with multiple independent or semi-independent nodes meant that failures were at least limited, and the wider system could still function. It strikes me that the current drive in many governments towards monolithic centralized CRM-style applications is the product of both heavy sales pressure from big guys like HP and Oracle, and a lack of perspective and experience by organizational IT decision-makers.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 2) 101

From what I can gather, the actual researchers suggesting a new Ice Age were not talking in fact about an imminent return of continent-spanning glaciers. That was hyperbole by science journalists of the time. This is why I find people who make claims of the state of any area of research based upon what some science reporter in a newspaper or magazine writes is a pretty dubious activity. Science journalists, to put it bluntly, spend their days sexing up often rather mundane or esoteric research into something that can produce "wow-pow!" headline, often betraying their own ignorance of the research in question.

Comment Re:sigh (Score 1) 101

And once again, what does the musings of a Law Professor in 1970 have to do with the state of the science in 1970? I don't give a flying f--- about 1970 climate zeitgeist. That's not the claim. The claim is clearly that climatologists in the 1970s believed the world was entering a new glacial period soon.

According to Skeptical Science, there were something like seven research papers in the period mentioning cooling, as opposed to over forty talking about temperature rises due to CO2. https://skepticalscience.com/i...

The Skeptical Science entry goes further to suggest that some of the reasons some researchers were positing cooling was due to SO2 releases at the time. One can debate whether those releases would have slowed temperature increases, but seeing as that SO2 limits were put in place, that's rather a moot point.

So what we have is a few alarmist articles of the period, little of their content apparently based on climatology research even at the time, and the usual anecdotal claims of "I remember my professor/teacher/some guy on TV saying the ice age was coming." In other words, no, few if any climatologists actual thought there was an ice age, and by that point, even 45-47 years ago, global warming due to human CO2 emissions was seen as a real phenomenon.

Comment Re:No surprise... (Score 1) 210

But, it's a direct admission that they were basically gouging for want of competition.

We live in a world with the most complex market dynamics in the history of human civilization (by a landslide) and this is all you've got?

AMD's new design probably has a sweet spot. I'm sure Intel's existing designs also have a sweet spot. According to Plato, Xeonophon, Hume, Smith, Kant, Thoreau, Mises, and Hayek's theory of division of labour, price signals on both sides must adjust to achieve optimal resource allocation internal to both firms, with Intel's volumes around their comparative sweet spot rising, and Intel's volumes around their comparative disadvantage falling.

That's just one additional component of the price signal. There's also the possibility that the price signal is being used to fire a warning shot over AMD's bow, that Intel is preparing to use their enormous war chest to engage in scorched-earth, oxygen-sucking anti-competitive tactics.

Pricing theory. There's more to it than derp derp derp "gouge".

Direct competition aside, the threat of power-efficient ARM designs in the data center might not have pressed Intel's feet to the fire, but I'm pretty sure Intel's feet have remained at least somewhat toasty, over this long decade of mainstream-CPU quasi-monopolistic seller's market.

You make the difference out to be going from a lawn-chair lemonade stand at the ultimate congestion point in the Medina airport to breaking rocks in a South African prison camp. No, it's more like going from a light sweat to a heavy sweat. Of all companies, Intel has never not proceeded by the sweat of its brow.

Only the paranoid survive.

Ka-snap!

Hike the margins while you still can!

Ka-snap!

More IPC, more SOI, more FinFET!

Ka-snap!

You want to see gouging? Ask any Intel engineer to lift his (or her) shirt.

Comment Re:Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 2) 564

So then the lone tech worker is stuck in an apartment forever effectively, without pairing up with someone else's income, and how do you fit kids into that picture, if both have to work, etc.

You don't fit kids into that picture. Kids are infeasible in today's society unless you're on welfare or extremely wealthy. Just leave raising the next generation to them.

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