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Comment Re: Including Nexus 6... (Score 1) 26

Hell, I'm still waiting for 7.0 on my Nexus 6. My wife's Nexus 5X has already gotten a Nougat update (past the initial 7.0). My Nexus 7 2013 LTE last got the August security update to Marshmallow. I suspect that I'm going to have to start looking into alternative ROMs, especially because the Pixel line, which I was hoping to upgrade to, will cost me about $900 to get the storage and resolution I want at middling specs. I'd rather go 3rd party and use my N6 until it dies (hopefully not the way my N4 did, with a smashed screen).

Comment Re:How long until the cheaters take over? (Score 2) 46

The speed bubble is ~35 mph, with a 30 minute timeout. That being said, I've been on flights with wifi, locked into the departing airport, and it's taken an hour or more to get out of the sandbox. Sucked transferring at DIA to BWI and driving home. Jitter really shouldn't play into it for more than a couple of minutes with close portals. Cell tower drift, on the other hand, while helping with Trekker, can screw you on a desk portal for a while (I've drifted 10s of km away sometimes).

Comment Re: How long until the cheaters take over? (Score 1) 46

Yeah, some people where I work really want to have PvP, but they don't play Ingress, so haven't seen the, um, drama associated with COMM, interactions, Intel maps, etc. I keep telling them that it's a Really Bad Idea, because even though they're adults and want to battle coworkers, there are so many bad, bad things that'll happen.

Comment Re:Using while driving (Score 2) 46

Yeah, Niantic may need to implement the speedlock/sandbox they have with Ingress, especially since several interactions require even more attention than "tap, hack". I can confidently hack portals in Ingress while driving (under 35 mph) with no fear of losing control. Needing to spin a pic at a Pokestop is slightly more involved. Needing to toss Pokeballs or battle at a gym is *way* too involved to do while driving...

Comment Re:Sun alumnis (Score 2) 43

You're missing an important distinction - SmartOS is based on illumos, which was forked years ago off of OpenSolaris when Oracle decided to shut that down.

SmartOS is thus illumos, and illumos and Oracle Solaris have diverged a good bit in the intervening years.

Comment Re:PUBLIC STREETS belong to the public (Score 1) 767

Many residential streets in Takoma Park (I live just north of there; and have several friends who I visit in TP) are narrow; with cars parked on both sides and about 1.5 lanes worth of travel space down the middle. When these turn in to alternatives for primary roads because an app told people to go there, yes it becomes a problem, and more than just a quality of life problem.

First off, these streets do not have the capacity of the primary roads that people are bleeding off of, and second, people who are directed to these more constricted alternate routes are probably more likely to disregard any control signage such as stop signs and just roll through them with the rest of the blob, as well as blocking the typically small intersections when said blob comes to a halt. Never underestimate the disregard for general safety or basic traffic laws that people can have when a herd of them are forced to move through an area not designed to handle them.

Comment Yeah... passwords... (Score 1) 637

Whenever I can, a completely randomly-generated password. At work, where, for reasons I can't go into, I need to change it every 3 days currently, a semi-random component and a date-based component, which ironically beats out the "last X similar passwords" check. If they're gonna make my life hell, I'll return it in spades... Also, I have to write down the date-based part, just to remember it for the next 3 days... #imahorribleperson

Comment This is self-limiting in the long-term (Score 1) 216

So a non-CPL pilot who can only accept a split of the gas cost, they're going to (in theory) be racking up hours on a airframe faster than they normally would, which will lead to more frequent mandated inspection and overhaul events... events that their prior fares wouldn't have put any money towards. Not to mention defraying the cost of any hangaring or parking fees. I fail to see how "Uber for Planes" would work for the private pilot outside of purely opportunistic "hey, you're going my way?" one-offs.

Submission + - Researcher Uses Valve Security Bug to Upload Paint Drying Game on Steam (

An anonymous reader writes: A security researcher found two bypasses in Valve's game review process that eventually allowed him to publish Steam Trading Cards and a full game on the Steam Store called "Watch Paint Dry" (reference to this case from last month involving the British film censors).

The game was supposed to be an April Fools' Day prank, but the researcher forgot to set a release date, and was published on the Steam Store last weekend. Valve has fixed the security bypass in the meantime. These were extremely dangerous since it allowed anyone to publish games on the Store (possible containing malware) without a Valve employee ever taking a look at them, or knowing they went through the review process.

Why BART Is Falling Apart 474 writes: Matthias Gafni writes in the San Jose Mercury News that the engineers who built BART, the rapid transit system serving the San Francisco Bay Area that started operation in 1972, used principles developed for the aerospace industry rather than tried-and-true rail standards. And that's the trouble. "Back when BART was created, (the designers) were absolutely determined to establish a new product, and they intended to export it around the world," says Rod Diridon. "They may have gotten a little ahead of themselves using new technology. Although it worked, it was extremely complex for the time period, and they never did export the equipment because it was so difficult for other countries to install and maintain." The Space Age innovations have made it more challenging for the transit agency to maintain the BART system from the beginning. Plus, the aging system was designed to move 100,000 people per week and now carries 430,000 a day, so the loss of even a single car gets magnified with crowded commutes, delays and bus bridges. For example, rather than stick to the standard rail track width of 4 feet, 8.5 inches, BART engineers debuted a 5-foot, 6-inch width track, a gauge that remains to this day almost exclusive to the system. Industry experts say the unique track width necessitates custom-made wheel sets, brake assemblies and track repair vehicles.

Another problem is the dearth of readily available replacement parts for BART's one-of-a-kind systems. Maintenance crews often scavenge parts from old, out-of-service cars to avoid lengthy waits for orders to come in; sometimes mechanics are forced to manufacture the equipment themselves. "Imagine a computer produced in 1972," says David Hardt. "No one is supporting that old equipment any longer, but those same microprocessors are what we have controlling our logic systems." Right now BART needs 100 thyristors at a total cost of $100,000. BART engineers said it could take 22 weeks to ship them to the San Francisco Bay Area to replace in BART's "C" cars, which make up the older cars in the fleet. Right now, the agency has none. Nick Josefowitz says it makes no sense to dwell on design decisions made a half-century ago. "I think we need to use what we have today and build off that, rather than fantasize what could have been done in the past. The BART system was state of the art when it was built, and now it's technologically obsolete and coming to the end of its useful life."

Submission + - Facebook Testing Anti-Impersonation Feature

Trailrunner7 writes: Phishing and account takeover attacks take many forms, especially on massive platforms such as Twitter or Facebook, and defending against them is a tall order. Facebook has tried a number of tactics over the years, and now the company is testing a new feature that will detect and warn users when someone else is trying to impersonate them on the network.

The system is designed to address a difficult problem on social networks: impostors. Many social media platforms allow anonymity in some form or another, but some, like Twitter, have adjusted those policies over time to require real names and identities. As more and more people connect their online identities to their real-world lives in various ways, the problem of online impostors has become a much more serious one. An attacker who has the ability to put together a convincing false account for someone else can cause serious damage to the victim’s personal and perhaps professional life.

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