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Comment Re:There was nothing to catch (Score 1) 141

Much like testing for certain medical diseases, sometimes you can only determine a cause by exclusion.

  • A phone that is turned off is consuming no power, so the failure cannot plausibly be caused by an excessive rate of discharge or by external heat (e.g. being too close to a hot GPU).
  • A phone that is not charging is adding no power to the pack, so the failure is probably not caused by an excessive rate of charge or by overcharging.
  • Multiple battery manufacturers use different battery chemistry and different designs, so the failure cannot plausibly be caused by dendrites or other similar failures. Also, the failures don't occur with those same batteries in other devices, which eliminates the batteries themselves as a likely cause.

When you eliminate the impossible, what remains are failures that can occur even with a battery that is neither charging nor discharging. The most likely causes, then, involve some form of physical damage.

LiPo packs change size during normal charging and discharging just a bit. That's why there are tolerances build into the design. With insufficient tolerances, bad things happen (TM), and even if the tolerances are sufficient to avoid self-puncturing at their maximum size, it is possible that flexing the case in just the right way while the pack is maximally swollen could still puncture the pack. So this is at least a plausible explanation, whereas most other theories aren't.

With that said, even if we assume that these folks are correct, it does not absolve other aspects of the design. Not all failures have only a single root cause. For example, IIRC, overcharging a LiPo pack can cause unusual levels of battery expansion from hydrogen buildup, which when combined with normal levels of flexing in a case that has insufficient tolerances, would result in the pack perforating and venting with flame.

Comment Re:Ah, the "We hate the US" platform? (Score 1) 98

Newsflash -- they don't make phones any more.

You asked for a Sailfish phone available in the US -- I said Nexus 5, you whined that it had no keyboard.

Newsflash -- neither did the Jolla one. (Yes, I know about the keyboard TOH, that's not a Jolla product).

Why was the Jolla one not available in the US? Because the US uses weird frequency bands that the SOC they used didn't support. Blame the FCC, not Jolla.

You seem to have a very strong sense of entitlement.

Submission + - How to View the SpaceX Falcon 9 Return to Flight at Vandenberg Air Force Base (perens.com)

Bruce Perens writes: Silicon Valley folks should, sometime, take the opportunity to view a launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Lompoc is 4-5 hours from the Bay, 2.5 hours from LA if there's ever no traffic. An upcoming SpaceX launch is notable because it's their return to flight, months after their last attempt blew up on the pad during a pre-launch test. Read how to view the launch.

Comment Re: Less politics (Score 1) 110

Eich resigned because of external pressure on the Mozilla organization. I hear that one of the lobbying activities against him was when the dating site "OK Cupid" started informing Firefox users who accessed the site of Eich's activities and that they should download a browser made by people who don't nominate someone with gender discrimination issues to be their CEO. At the time, 8% of OK Cupid customers were there to arrange same-gender meetings.

They felt he was the public face of the company.

Russ Nelson published a piece on what he theorized was the economic motivation of Blacks to be lazy, and was booted off of the Open Source Initiative board. He wasn't thinking about how it would be perceived. A modified version of the piece is still online, but not the version that got him in trouble. In general, executives are seen as the public faces of their organizations even in the case of Nelson, who was not the chairman of the board, but was simply a member of the executive board. In Nelson's case, it wasn't that he made publicity appearances and press releases, it was that he was one of the people with the power to direct the company (and thus a more real face of the company than soneone who just does PR), and folks did not trust that someone who wrote what he did would behave as they would like in that position.

Comment Re:What's the big deal? (Score 2, Insightful) 241

Playboy departed the nude photo market due to the vast and unending supply of photos and video of all manner of naked people doing sexual things which one can access via the Internet.

However, one can make a case that a good deal of the past content of Playboy was about objectifying women and to some extent the publication still is about that.

It was a dumb decision. Several people just weren't thinking. They're embarrassed now. They learned, and won't do it again.

Comment Re: Less politics (Score 1) 110

It was only 1967 when the United States Supreme Court decided Loving v. Virginia, a miscegenation case. Preventing blacks and whites from marrying, as the State of Virginia (and many others) did with laws on its books until it was forced to remove them in 1967, is an issue of racism, nothing else. One doesn't have to be thin skinned to be disgusted by racism.

Why should I feel any different about gender discrminiation? Texas had a law on the book making homosexual relations illegal in 1998, and two men were arrested for it and similarly to Loving, helped to strike it down in the courts. Marriage discrimination is yet another legal wall erected by the prejudiced. Doesn't take a thin skin at all to oppose it and its supporters.

Comment Re: Less politics (Score 1) 110

Because you are an end-user and not an investor in these companies, you might actually think the public face of the companies is a logo or a trademark rather than a human being. Perhaps you think the public face of McDonalds is Ronald McDonald! Or that Sprint's used to be that actor who portrayed a technician. But this naiveté is not shared by the people who are the target audience for the public face that the CEO's appearances and quotations produce. AMD has people to handle the guy who once plugged one of their CPUs into a motherboard. The public face nurtured by the CEO is reserved for investors and business relationships, government, and corporate citizenship. These are all areas in which a decision made outside of the company can have great impact on the company. And so, if you go on the company site, you will see the CEO quoted in the press releases related to those items. At trade shows, you will see these CEOs as keynotes. I am heading for CES in January, where many CEOs you've never heard of who run large tech companies will be speaking, and there will be full halls of their eager target audiences.

Don't you think it might be self-centered to assume someone's not the public face of the company because you don't know who they are?

Comment Re:Bad Headline (Score 1) 580

The other companies gave no answer, which for any company that didn't have a history of inadvertently enabling genocide was IMO the right thing to do. Such political trolling really shouldn't even be dignified with a response, in general.

But you're right about IBM. Ethically speaking, they should have been the first to say no, given what happened the last time they helped with a database of everyone in a particular religious group. Then again, it is also possible that because IBM and its employees were not punished for their role in enabling the Holocaust, the bean counters that run the place would dutifully enable another one. Scary thought.

Comment Since no one apparently said it (Score 1) 580

Twitter doesn't do government services and they'll be out of business shortly. Also, their leader is a left wing ideologue.

The rest of the companies would gladly take on the work. This surprises you how?

Did you somehow think that your ideology was going to keep on preventing people from working with Trump without political power? Think again.

Comment Re:Apple bears some responsibility here. (Score 1) 118

The G3 series had a ferrite choke a quarter inch from the plug, and that quarter inch of wire constantly broke, causing fires, so they recalled the entire lot of them and replaced them with the yo-yo power supply.

Slight correction. I'm not sure if they actually caused fires; they were recalled because they considered them to be a fire risk from overheating, which presumably was caused by shorting caused by the cable failures.

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