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Comment Re: Notice the timing on the propaganda piece (Score 1) 410

Not according to every single UN report on the subject, up to and including just days ago, but by all means, keep being a dictator's internet propagandist.

FYI, since you're late to the party, there no longer is anything called "Al-Nusra". The name changed to Jabhat Fateh al-Sham when they broke from al-Qaeda.

Comment Re:No, they didn't. (Score 1) 410

Thank you, I read this headline and immediately sighed at the stupidity of it as well.

Russia likes doing these sort of braggadocious product unveilings; they're often rather disconnected from the reality of how their development goes. That's not to say that Russia can't develop good products - they can. But every time they make these product announcements it's like "The world will imminently fall at our feet due to the obvious revolutionary technological superiority of our latest offering!", when it's most often anything but.

Comment Re:Hmm (Score 2) 410

Aluminum was largely the key to the "missile gap" that developed between the US and USSR in ICBMs in the 1960s. Before that, ICBMs had been liquid-fueled, which presented storage, complexity and bulk problems (also prevented underwater launch on submarines). The US discovered that the addition of aluminum powder to solid rocket propellant mixes would simultaneously increase ISP, thrust, density, and burn stability, and moved immediately toward the development of a series of solid ICBMs; the Soviets were late to catch onto the significance of aluminum in propellant mixes, and fell over half a decade behind as a consequence.

Comment Re:Hmm (Score 2) 410

Quotation needed. And no, Ukraine does not count. They had a vote and voted to be part of Russia; that's a far cry from rolling in the tanks and taking it by force.

They did send in their military, that's who the "Little Green Men" were. Even Putin has publicly admitted this. The "vote" was held under occupation, not internationally recognized, boycotted by significant segments of the population, and even Russia at one point accidentally released the "real" numbers from the vote which didn't match the official ones.

Do recall that Russia is a country where Chechnya "voted for" United Russia (Putin's Party) 99% in 2001. Some parts of Grozny voted for "The Butcher of Grozny" by well over 100%. You seriously think that's legit?

Amazing how many apologists for Russia there are here. False equivalencies are clearly alive and well.

Comment Re:Hmm (Score 4, Insightful) 412

If Putin doesn't want 1941 to happen again - or rather, don't want to be embroiled again in a terrible war, - why is his regime trying to make enemies of the most powerful nations in the world?

As little as four years ago, Russia was a moderately respected nation about which our major beefs were homophobia and an apparently state sponsored murder of a former citizen on foreign soil. Now it's government is lying about its involvement in shooting down planes full of civilians, building giant bombs, and, whether the Russian government hacked US emails or not, Putin's assets have certainly been out in front making use of the leaked materials in an obvious effort to smear the likely winner of the current US election - from "reporting" on emails depicted as critical of Clinton sent by her friends that were actually forwarded news articles to publishing doctored copies with faked headers in an attempt to make Clinton look like a racist.

This is not the behavior of a country worried about war. It's the behavior of a demagogue eager to make war more likely.

Comment Re:Thoughts (Score 1) 463

If you mean FORTRAN, COBOL, et al by "real language", yeah it might have been once except for the fact the PC's implementation (CAPS "LOCK" is actually CAPS REVERSE SHIFT ON LETTERS) is broken too. Anyone who just wants a useful capitalization button has been SooL for a while.

The "Search" key on Chromebooks can be search, it can be Caps Lock if you want that, or it can be Control or Alt. Google has made it configurable.

Comment Re:where is your brain? (Score 1) 164

Are you actually asserting that demand is level 24 hours a day?

It can come very close.

In California, for example, a very large part of the demand is pumping water through aquaducts. By placing reservoirs along the way and doing most of the pumping during times of low electrical demand, California electrical utilities used to be able to keep the power demand nearly constant - and can still keep it much more level than in many other places.

Also: Coal plants can provide baseload, while wind and solar together do a great job of shaving peaks: Higher wind corresponds to higher HVAC load as well as higher generation. Solar not only tracks the air conditioning requirements but also comes close to tracking the daily load peaking - and solar plus wind tracks it even better, since the lake effect makes an afternoon-through-evening hump in wind generation.

at a power output proportional to the CUBE of the windspeed.

is this relevant somehow?

Yes, very. The steeply up-bending curve means that wind generators that are able to make use of high winds - which only happen for a tiny fraction of the time - have a peak power rating far above the average power they are able to produce in normal winds. So the peak power vastly overstates their average contribution.

Comment Re:Let me know when ... (Score 4, Insightful) 164

The power can be stored,

The issue is not that the power can be stored.

The issue is that power capacity comparisons overstate the total amount of energy you get out of the renewable generation equipment over the long haul because coal generation can run near capacity all the time and renewables (excluding water power) only a small part of the time.

I'm quite supportive of renewable energy. (I'm a major participant on one of the renewable energy tech discussion boards, too.) But while it's very GOOD that renewable power has passed coal in power capacity, even with near-ideal load-levelling storage, it will take about another factor of three before it surpasses coal in providing usable energy to the loads.

Comment Let me know when ... (Score 1, Insightful) 164

... they overtake coal for amount generated per unit time.

Renewables may have higher total peak, but coal plants have level output and can run 24/7, while sun is only about a third of the day and wind varies with the weather - at a power output proportional to the CUBE of the windspeed.

Comment Thoughts (Score 1) 463

1. Apricot did the "Small display integrated with keyboard" thing with a bunch of their MS DOS machines in the 1980s. You could use it as a calculator, and apps could address it directly. It was a good idea, but the lack of it on the PC meant they quietly dropped the feature when they switched to making PC clones.

2. So they're losing Esc, but they're keeping the Caps Lock key? Even Google has the design sense to lose that.

Comment Microsoft failed at legacy, too (Score 1) 210

Once Android has the same desktop dockability, the only advantage of Continuum will be the ability to run legacy Windows apps. Not a small advantage, that - but the keyword is legacy. The market for people that want a pricey phone with crappy phone apps so they can dock it to use legacy X86 Windows apps is pretty small.

But that's the thing, Microsoft's solution doesn't even do that; because their Windows Phone (now Windows 10 Mobile) devices run on ARM, they can't run legacy x86 Windows apps, and people can't even recompile those for ARM even if they wanted to and in the cases where there'd be no issues because Microsoft won't let you distribute and install non-'Metro' (or whatever exactly they're calling it now; UWP, I think?) code on ARM-based versions of Windows. The only stuff you can run using Continuum is Windows Store non-legacy apps, which are actually a far smaller set of applications than those available on the Google Play Store or iOS App Store. Hell, my old Nokia N9, the product left in a ditch as Nokia jumped foolishly on the Windows Phone bandwagon, has a more vibrant developer community with a better selection of applications than Windows Phone managed for quite a while, so leaning on the new-apps side of the strategy wasn't ever going to be a winning play for Microsoft.

Microsoft's mobile offerings floundered for many reasons, and no small part of it was how they completely failed to take advantage of their entrenched positioning in the desktop market.

Comment Re:They both look the same from here (Score 1) 12

Read the definition of fascism. It simply doesn't require racism.

Yes, it does. This is the umpteenthm time you've made this claim, and it's why I'm going to plonk you now. I've explained it to you. I've even linked to Mussolini's own words and actions on the subject. You've outstayed your welcome, using sophistry to push forward the utterly stupid claim that racism isn't part of fascism.

Just because the term was coined in the 1900s doesn't mean that it wasn't practiced before

Yes, it does. The term and the ideology were invented by Mussolini. Mussolini had some thoughts, he gave a name to them. He didn't announce "Hey guys, I've come up with yet another synonym for totalitarianism", which would have been pointless, given totalitarianism has plenty of synonyms already.

If she was such a big fan of democracy, why didn't she object to what the DMC was doing

Because what the DNC did was a non-scandal. You had people in a political organization admitting in emails that they preferred one candidate over another. That's called real life. The DNC leaks revealed little of substance beyond one issue DWS rightly resigned over that Clinton had no knowledge of.

Hillary also promotes violence (promoting war is certainly promoting violence)

Promoting war is not promoting violence against your political enemies. Osama Bin Laden has never run in an election against Hillary Clinton. Clinton has never declared war on Trump.

But if you want recent scapegoating, just look at her refusal to say that the leaked emails are true or fake, instead using the Russians as scapegoats to distract attention from the core issue)

As I've explained to you several times before, they're not her emails, and it would be incomprehensibly stupid for her to confirm something she has no control over is "genuine".

As far as the Russians go: she has protested that the Russians are involving themselves in the US election by committing illegal acts and leaking one side's emails. She's not the originator of that claim, that's the official position of the US government. She is entirely entitled to be pissed off that the Russians are trying to influence the US election, still worse by illegal means.

Suppression of truth and trying to control the story in the media counts. And she certainly did all she could do to defend Bill and attack his accusers when they were telling the truth.

No, it doesn't "count". Trying to control the story in the media is normal behavior for every politician, it's called spin. As for attacking her husband's accusers "when they were telling the truth" (which hasn't happened very often), she's entitled, as his wife, to believe him, and defend her husband.

You're zero for six, or maybe more than six, I've lost count, and you've become truly offensive. I appreciate trolling is your specialty, but this has gone far enough. One of the candidates at this election meets the definition of a fascist. The other is merely a little dishonest and a bit of a war monger. This election is - casting Clinton in the worst possible light and arguably far worse than the facts support - Mussolini vs Nixon, not Mussolini vs Franco.

Of course, you'd probably argue Nixon was a fascist too. But that's because apparently Canada's education system is just as terrible as that in the United States. Who knew.


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