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Comment Re:FP becomes more popular than OOP? (Score 1) 415

The industry learned the hard way that OOP works well for some things but not others. For example, OOP has mostly failed in domain modeling (modeling real-world "nouns") but is pretty good at packaging API's for computing and networking services.

The industry may also learn the hard way where FP does well and where it chokes. Some understandably don't want to be the guinea pigs.

Comment Re:Functional Programming Considered Harmful (Score 1) 415

If you work on Chevies when everyone else is working on Fords, then you may have difficulty finding mechanics for your customized Chevies. I've yet to see evidence FP is objectively "better" in enough circumstances and niches to justify narrowing staffing options except for certain specialties. (I've complained about lack of practical demonstrations elsewhere on this story.)

Comment Re:The Widow (Score 1) 184

I'm still trying to figure out how I didn't know about it until just recently.

Oh, I'll tell you why. Because season one only recently came to Netflix. It's the same as with Preacher, and Hap & Leonard and other cool shows. The target demographic (idiots like me) don't watch cable TV, but when it comes to Netflix, we're all over it.

Comment Re: Steam? (Score 1) 126

That's why I said "sort of" when I was making the point. The same holds true for DVDs as well though, you don't own the movie, you're just leasing a plastic disc. If you break your DVD you would have to buy a new one and laws at the time made it illegal (or tried to at least) to circumvent the copy-protection mechanisms included on the DVD to create a digital backup of the contents.

Comment Re:Steam? (Score 1) 126

Not really. Steam is like buying DVDs off of Amazon. You own (sort of) the product and you don't have to keep paying a subscription fee to maintain access.

This sounds like a model where you pay a subscription fee and can just play whatever games are available through the service. If you quit paying, you lose access, but otherwise you can play whatever game you want through the service. There have already been a few different services that have tried this in the past, and some more recent ones as well (I recall NVidia having some service where you could "rent" one of their high-end graphics cards and play through the cloud) so it's hardly a new idea or something that doesn't exist. I just think that most people prefer to buy the games outright rather than having a subscription model.
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Journal Journal: Gone Again!

As always, if slashdot has borked the text, just go here.
She was gone again, shortly before my elderly cat died. I refer to my muse, of course.
I looked everywhere I could think of, to no avail. Stolen again? I went for a walk, on the lookout for that aged black aged Lincoln with that blonde and that brun

Comment Re:TV show writers on strike. So? (Score 1) 184

Quite frankly, a monkey could write the garbage we get fed these days. "Scripted reality", yeah, right, what kind of drugs do you have to be on to consider this to be in any way even remotely close to "reality"? In between we got court TV and other garbage that needs zero writer or talent by the actors, sorry, "genuine people presenting real cases".

Even the most lame reality TV show is scripted. In fact, that's one of the things the Screenwriters Guild is fighting about. Currently, if you write a script for a reality show, you are treated differently than if you write for a drama or comedy.

You didn't think Honey Boo Boo was spontaneous, did you?

Comment Re:High-brow fails [Re:It depends on the use] (Score 1) 415

Addendum and corrections:

The "actor model" seems pretty close to event driven programming. I don't know the official or exact difference. But my key point is that the event handling programming and interface is procedural. The only non-procedural aspect may be that requests for further actions may need a priority value (rank) and to be submitted to a request queue. For example, a game character may request a "shoot arrow" event on their part as a follow-up. But the event handler writer doesn't have to concern themselves with the direct management of the event-request-queue.

"Any more than...query writers...don't have to know..." should be "Any more than...query writers...have to know...". Remove "don't"

Comment Re:High-brow fails [Re:It depends on the use] (Score 1) 415

is more important now because of the trend towards more and more cores

But the bottleneck is not CPU itself for a good many applications. And specialized languages or sub-languages can handle much of the parallelism. If I ask a database to do a sort, it may use parallelism under the hood, but I don't have to micromanage that in most cases: I don't care if the sort algorithm uses FP or gerbils on treadmills. Similar with 3D rendering: the designer submits a 3D model with polygons and texture maps, and a rendering engine micromanages the parallelism under the hood. That "root engine" may indeed use FP, but the model maker doesn't have to know or care.

And event-driven programming can hide that fact that parallelism is going on, or at least provide a non-FP interface. For example, in a game, a character may be programmed by how they respond to various events. There may be 10 events going on at once, but the app dev is only focusing on one at a time per character or character type. Granted, it may take better languages or API's to abstract parallelism well. The "root engines" may make heavy use of FP, such as the database, rendering, and event handling engines, but the 2nd level, typically called "application developers", probably won't need that any more than SQL query writers (usually) don't have to know how the database engine was written. But only time will tell...

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"The eleventh commandment was `Thou Shalt Compute' or `Thou Shalt Not Compute' -- I forget which." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982

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