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Comment Re:Why does the ESA have a worse record of landing (Score 1) 67

I appreciate the explanation, but isn't it more that the new system was added in rush (to replace the old ones) as opposed to it being the first time used? It seems like the NASA successes were first time uses of those landing systems also, from what I remember.

Also, I really don't understand how IP applies since these are not products for commercial sale nor used for commercial purposes. I don't see where NASA could even bring a suit.

Comment Not Practical (Score 1) 121

You can't just handwave away the massive cost of proving a charger per parking space, nor even the cost of an outlet per parking space along with the electrical lines buried capable of having every single parking space drawing enough current to charge...

Even if that were practical what exactly do you imagine will happen to someone's personal charging cables or equipment left unattended overnight. Thieves are taking copper pipe out of buildings with the water still on...

Comment 3D first, self-flying much easier (Score 1) 51

Great. Let me know when it's bulletproof in a 2D environment and I'll consider the 3D version.

That's actually backwards. Solving for the 3D case is vastly simpler, because while in the air you have very few obstacles to content with, you basically just have to be sure you can react to other planes, and have programmed in the coordinates of no-fly zones - otherwise travel is just a straight line. There are already drones that can find their way back home if the control signal is lost, and almost drones that can fly around tree branches without hitting them...

For takeoff landing you can simply dictate that a solid volume of sufficient space must be below or above you to land/takeoff.

Comment It can be solved - the solution is Hydrogen (Score 1) 121

I've noticed that also in the past when traveling and staying with friends in Europe.

That's why I still think the future for most electric cars will end up being hydrogen, not battery power - though with advancements like these battery may be a higher percentage, especially if you could go somewhere just one day a week to spend a half hour charging.

Comment Normal is not what you think (Score 1) 121

Long charging times are for most people only a problem on vacation. Normally people commute much shorter distances than the maximum modern electric cars can drive and can charge their cars at night.

I love how you say "normally" when the vast number of people who have cars live in apartments where it may not be "normal" to have a plug anywhere near the car at night.

Is your goal to have electric cars for only the elite? Or for EVERYONE? If electric cars are to break out of a tiny niche for the rich they have to work for people who do not own homes.

Comment That would be the real game changer (Score 1) 121

Non-electric cars are simply more practical for most people not just because of range, but also charging time. Even Tesla Supercharger stations take way too long for most people to tolerate.

But if you have 1000 miles of range, suddenly it's much more practical to live with a very long charging time because you can wait a day or two to find a good charging solution - plus it would mean you could get somewhere faster than with a gas vehicle since you wouldn't have to stop on a long trip to fill up.

We'll see if the tech actually materializes in real life, but I really hope it does.

Comment Why does the ESA have a worse record of landing? (Score 2) 67

First of all, I don't see much mention that they still have a new satellite in orbit around Mars so the mission is at least partly successful.

But with a string of failures to land on Mars from the ESA, and a string of successes from NASA you have to start to wonder - what is it that is lacking in the ESA program that is not able to get landings right? Is it just different approaches to the problems of landing that are not panning out over a few attempts? Is it some kind of engineering process failure that they just are not accounting for some possibilities? I was wondering if anyone had any insight.

I wish the ESA the best of luck and really want to se them succeed, as the more craft studying mars the better (though they are all a handful of beans in comparison to the first human to land and study there).

Comment Re:Illusion of secure encryption on an insecure OS (Score 3, Insightful) 58

Indeed; there are many reasons not to do business with Apple and many reasons to never use proprietary, user-subjugating software. Contrary to one of the follow-ups to the parent post, this has everything to do with TrueCrypt, VeraCrypt, and any other free software to which one entrusts their sensitive information. There's nothing these programs can do to fix the real problem. The user has to switch operating systems to a fully free software, user-respecting OS and install only free software on top of that to do the best we can do to avoid the aforementioned problems. So while nobody can blame these free software programs for leaked keys, passphrases, and other leaked information there's no reason to trust the underlying proprietary software these free programs rely on to do everything they do when running on non-free OSes.

Comment Re:Useless for any occasion (Score 1) 375

You mention hunting - is it really a quick draw sport where if the reader takes an extra few seconds to recognize you, it's a critical failure?

Yes depending on what you are hunting, sometimes you have only a moment, and you never walk with guns at the ready.

I don't even bother to read the rest of what you wrote, it's so absurd to argue with someone with zero understanding of the subject. It would be like trying to discuss the drawbacks of various design patterns with a toddler...

Comment Re:how about 4A (Score 2) 363

force them to arrest you

So, effectively ruin your life? By doing that, you not only get into databases that you might have had some chance avoiding otherwise, you also fuck over your chances of ever having a decent job again (unless you happen to be in a career such as activist or journalist where getting arrested is respected instead of condemned). HR departments are too stupid and lazy to know or care about the difference between getting arrested because you're a criminal and getting arrested because the police are criminals.

In the totalitarian police state of America, it's injustices all the way down.

Comment Yes I do have an idea (Score 1) 375

You have NO IDEA how effective the finger scanner will be.

Because it's an added layer on top of a system that already sometimes fail (guns jam or sometimes safeties will not release), and furthermore it's an electric system requiring power to function - I can guarantee it will increase the failure rate in successful access to gun for self defense.

To put that in real world terms, lets go for a very low figure and say the increase in failures means there are twenty more women raped in a year. Why would you be for that? Doesn't sound like a good tradeoff to me.

In reality of course the increase in allowed raped would be much higher because it would be mostly females purchasing a "smart" gun, misled by people like yourself into thinking they are better in some way... it's kind of like you are just one step removed from raping them.

Comment Re:You use an AR-15 to protect your home (Score 1) 375

You and your AR-15 don't stand a chance against a modern mechanized army

As is proved so very well by ISIS and the complete destruction they have undergone...

Oh wait, they have a whole state of their own built on AK-47's (same difference) and theft.

If freedom's your bag start trying to figure out the wealth inequality problem. Money is freedom.

Right, because the value of "money" is not arbitrarily determined by the state and can not be pulled or disabled remotely at any time... Oh wait again.

In a conflict free world you would be right that money is power. But money the way you are thinking about it is a dangerously thin illusion of power.

Comment Useless for any occasion (Score 1) 375

Seems like it would be useful in an environment like a gun range where you aren't relying on it for safety.

A) as another poster noted, the whole reason you go to a gun range is to get more better at shooting the guns you have, so that if you need to (or want to) use them for real later - either quickly like self defense, or more methodically like hunting - you know how well you can aim with them, what realistic distances are, how much kick to absorb or correct for...

B) Which leads us to a fingerprint scanner being a disaster in a crisis situation like a home invasion, you don't have the time for that nor want to rely that a gun you might have not touched for a while still has power enough to enable the fingerprint scanner. Similarily if you go hunting, it would REALLY REALLY SUCK to travel for hours to find out your fingerprint friend has no power or just decides that environmental conditions mean your fingers are now invalid.

So said fingerprint scanner gun would never be a gun you would use in real life, making it pointless to shoot at the range,

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 317

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

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