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Comment Re:I like my curved monitor (Score 1) 119

Distance doesn't matter. It's all down to how many degrees of your vision that the screen takes up.

That makes as much sense as saying it's all down to the area of the rectangle, the length doesn't matter. Field of vision (degrees) is a function of screen size and distance just like area is a function of length and width. Most of us sit way closer to the monitor than the TV, not just absolutely speaking but relative to the size. I just did a quick measurement and found I sit about 60cm away from a 28" monitor. That means I should sit 120cm from a 55" TV or 240cm away from a 110" TV for the same field of vision. In fact at the back wall of my living room at about 4m I'd need a 180" projector. So if curved only makes sense for big fields of vision, we need to sit way closer or buy way bigger TVs. So I think for typical living room distances the answer should be to give us reasonably priced 100"+ TVs first, then we can talk about curved.

Comment Re:Check out Dr. Joel Fuhrman's approach (Score 2) 62

This comment sums up an alternative to the Fuhrman approach that is more fat heavy:
https://www.amazon.com/review/...
" ... based on what I've read and the lectures I've listened to over the last year, I'd say that the low carb, high (healthy) fat, moderate protein (LCHF) diet works for more people with type 2 diabetes than Fuhrman's diet, BUT his diet DOES work well for type 2 diabetics too. Which diet works best for you likely will be influenced by what your ancestors ate. If you enjoy eating grass-fed, pastured meat, free range poultry and eggs, and wild seafood, try the LCHF diet first. If you prefer a whole food, plant-based diet (vegan or vegetarian) try Fuhrman's diet first. Of all the books written on the low carb diet, Mark Hyman's book, The Blood Sugar Solution, is probably the best because it goes into greater detail on all aspects of a healthy diet, not just low carb. ..."

Basically, the "Fat makes you fat" meme (which led to eating lots of refined carbs) has been terrible for our health! Our brains are mostly fat. Healthy fats are an important part of any diet, although we can argue about the best sources of them.

The "Banting diet" (later variant is the Dukan diet) builds on that protein/fat alternative -- but a problem with that approach healthwise is that too much protein and meat from badly raised animals can cause other health issues in the long-term (as well as ethical issues). Of course, it still may be better to get rid of diabetes first anyway you can and then worry about preventing cancer later when you feel better...

I also think Fuhrman is probably low on his iodine and vitamin D recommendations. And his general advice may not be a good match some few people with specific needs from genetics or microbiomes.

In general, Fuhrman's history as a world-class athlete in training may also bias him towards expecting so much that some people give up entirely (so, there is social / psychological aspect of all this that is somehow missed -- perhaps intentionally) whereas they may have done better with a lesser approach. I also agree it is very easy to backslide when only one family member makes the change and is constantly confronted with other people in their space with SAD eating habits.

Another interesting discussion with a specific disagreement with Fuhrman vs. McDougall even within broad agreement:
http://lanimuelrath.com/mcdoug...
"The similarities between these 2 doctors and their dietary approaches are far greater than their differences."

Comment Check out Dr. Joel Fuhrman's approach (Score 1) 62

https://www.drfuhrman.com/shop...
"After I was diagnosed with diabetes, my brother recommended I read Dr. Fuhrman's book The End of Diabetes. I started to read it right away and applied what I learned from it to my own life. By the time I was able to see my doctor -- three weeks later -- I had already lost 15 pounds, my blood glucose levels had returned to normal and the doctor said he had planned on putting me on meds but, after reviewing my new numbers, he would hold off for three more months. By that appointment, I had lost a total of 35 pounds, going from 218 to 188 pounds on my 6'1" frame ... I feel great and I never had to go on diabetes medication. My physician is now lowering my blood pressure medication, too. Thank you!!!"

Also see reviews here:
https://www.amazon.com/End-Dia...

Key idea:
http://web.archive.org/web/201...
"Scientific evidence suggests that the re-sensitization of taste nerves takes between 30 and 90 days of consistent exposure to less stimulating foods. This means that for several weeks, most people attempting this change will experience a reduction in eating pleasure. This is why modern foods present such a devastating trap--as most of our citizens are, in effect, "addicted" to artificially high levels of food stimulation! The 30-to-90-day process of taste re-calibration requires more motivation-- and more self-discipline -- than most people are ever willing to muster.
    Tragically, most people are totally unaware that they are only a few weeks of discipline away from being able to comfortably maintain healthful dietary habits--and to keep away from the products that can result in the destruction of their health. Instead, most people think that if they were to eat more healthfully, they would be condemned to a life of greatly reduced gustatory pleasure--thinking that the process of Phase IV will last forever. In our new book, The Pleasure Trap, we explain this extraordinarily deceptive and problematic situation -- and how to master this hidden force that undermines health and happiness."

I feel Dr. Fuhrman is slightly wrong about a few of things, but overall he is very right on the big picture and a good place to start. Good luck nomad63!

Comment Re:Donald Trump? (Score 1) 190

Trump, is simply vocalizing what a lot of people already think on the state of the media. And him vocalizing what people already believe is one of the big reasons why he was elected, round that out with the out-right refusal to bow to political correctness. Why do you think trust of it is so low in western countries? It's not because of Trump. It's because of the media.

Comment Re:Only? (Score 0) 135

Japan's problem is their inability to let the failures go down in flames and fail for the good of the rest of the economy and of the society.

Japan is the place were you go to when you want to get funny money for trading/shorting, that's the place you go to borrow Yen to do all this insane trading. Japan is the place of the suicide economic policy, the kamikaze of policies (the one that USA is also following), the policy destroying the currency for the purpose of bailing out horrible failures just to keep them going due to political expediency and not due to any form of sound economics at all.

This in turn leads to economic stagnation, falling birth rates, depression, etc. All the good stuff that the central bankers together with the government love to give its people.

Comment Re:Apples for apples (Score 1) 67

Hi there, I've founded and run - and sold! - several businesses in the US, just did another one. I know how tax deductions work. And I know, too, that if you lose money at the end of the day you don't have to pay income taxes. But you still LOST MONEY. Paying tax means you made a profit; not paying tax means you didn't make a profit. Currently Tesla is spending more than it's bringing in, so it loses money. You don't make "profit" tha way...
Government

FCC To Halt Rule That Protects Your Private Data From Security Breaches (arstechnica.com) 79

According to Ars Technica, "The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information." From the report: The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information -- such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data -- from theft and data breaches. The rule would be blocked even if a majority of commissioners supported keeping them in place, because the FCC's Wireline Competition Bureau can make the decision on its own. That "full commission vote on the pending petitions" could wipe out the entire privacy rulemaking, not just the data security section, in response to petitions filed by trade groups representing ISPs. That vote has not yet been scheduled. The most well-known portion of the privacy order requires ISPs to get opt-in consent from consumers before sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other third parties. The opt-in rule is supposed to take effect December 4, 2017, unless the FCC or Congress eliminates it before then. Pai has said that ISPs shouldn't face stricter rules than online providers like Google and Facebook, which are regulated separately by the Federal Trade Commission. Pai wants a "technology-neutral privacy framework for the online world" based on the FTC's standards. According to today's FCC statement, the data security rule "is not consistent with the FTC's privacy standards."

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