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Comment Re:Browser apps (Score 1) 112

Probably includes almost nothing but those type of apps, with maybe a few 'plugins' (read, pluggable functions that are narrowly defined and compiled-in w/ no 'developer' intervention) tossed-in for good measure.

What I'm curious about is how much bloat a typical app generated this way carries, versus a decent/competently-coded bespoke application on the same platform.

Comment Re:problems, lol (Score 2) 204

I write web services for remote clients to send information to. 50 msec includes the time to establish a TCP connection to the nginx frontend (written in C!), then to run a little bit of Python code to massage the request and either store it in a database (probably written in C, or maybe Java) or fetch data from one, then to return the results to the remote client. At a previous employer, my code did that about 80,000 times per second, averaged 24/7. At the shop before that, we load tested to 500,000 requests per second but it was only for a few minutes sustained at a time.

When was the last time you personally wrote code to handle 500Kops? Did you know that those durn whippersnappers at Google runs a big chunk of their stack on Python and that they'd laugh at our tiny it doesn't matter to the end user. If we could have reduced a 50ms transaction to 10ms by altering the speed of the light signals carrying our requests, we probably would have. But since we live in a universe with physics, the best we could possible hope for was to reduce the time spent in application code to 0.000ms and thereby drop the entire transaction time to 49ms.

Comment Re:so the European Comission admits it? (Score 1) 193

So, low taxes attract jobs after all? And the European Commission admits it?

ReRTFA & its quite clear that the motivation in quote you're referring to ("motivated by employment considerations") is assigned to Irish Tax Officials and not to the European Commission. They're not admitting a thing.

Note: I have no pony in this race & have no opinion on whether tax breaks create jobs or not. But your referenced quote is not the smoking gun you make it out to be.

Comment Re:problems, lol (Score 1) 204

Or, you know. You could actually learn how to write good code at the most powerful level. That's a radical thought.

I did, and that's why I'm using Python. I'm capable of writing web services in C, but who the hell's got time for that craziness? Also consider Amdahl's Law: in most of stuff I write, the "running code to process data" bit is a teensy portion of wall clock time. Much more is spent in socket handshaking or waiting for database queries to finish. Out of a 50ms request lifecycle, perhaps 1ms is spent inside a box that I have complete control of. Even if I rewrote it in assembler (C is for high-level pansies) to be 1000x faster, the request would still take 49.001ms. An assload of work porting security-sensitive code into an untyped languages so that the end result can be 2% faster? Yeah, no. My boss would fire me with a quickness if I proposed that.

I'd be much more likely to rewrite performance-critical code in Go or Rust. They're as fast as C but without the death of a thousand cuts like gotofail waiting to ruin your careful planning. Life's too short to waste it hacking in languages that hate you and make you want to look incompetent.

Comment Re:Unsustainable pricing on high tech gadgets (Score 1) 106

It doesn't cost $800 to manufacture an iPhone. More like $100. In the US it would maybe be $150. It is Apples greed that is the blame.

There are always lines around the block on launch day. People cheerfully buy tens of millions of each iPhone. If people are willing to pay that price without a gun to their head, and there are alternatives that they could buy instead but they choose to buy iPhones anyway, how do you justify describing it as greed?

Comment No...just, no. (Score 4, Interesting) 158

No one actually has to "hack" anything -- just get the thought out there. No matter who wins, stories like this will be cited by the losing side as "proof" the election was "rigged" or "hacked", and that the winner didn't win legitimately. I can think of few things more damaging to the democratic institution.

See also:

A Powerful Russian Weapon: The Spread of False Stories

Comment Re:Captain Kirk says... (Score 2) 305

Oh yeah! Mid 40's here and have been skydiving since 2012, and really gearing up on flying a wingsuit out of the plane for the last couple of years. Funnily enough life's been pretty awesome since then, so I'm in no hurry to rush into BASE, much less Wingsuit base, which seems like it has a ridiculously high fatality rate. I know three amazing wingsuit pilots, one who was my AFF instructor back in 2012, who have gone in this year. I think they were all trying to fly that ridiculous run in Charmonix. Cave diving and surfing the waves from collapsing glaciers in Alaska are similarly hazardous and awesome. There is no shortage of potentially deadly hobbies to get into!

Comment Thieves, Eh? (Score 1) 461

Given the blatantly false hype on the game right up to the day before the launch, I'd say the refunds are preventing a much more expensive class action lawsuit that could very easily be won by the players by just running the trailer footage alongside the actual gameplay footage. What was promised was not delivered, and the only reason you had as many preorders as you did was due to the promises of the developers. In fact, now that I'm thinking about it and pissed off again, maybe I'll pen a letter to the FTC asking them to look into it!

Comment Re:WTF are they proposing to improve exactly? (Score 3, Informative) 94

When they talk about the "user experience" they mean someone who is buying ads, not the person who is posting "Look what Hillary Trump said last night" every day. Think in terms of Facebook's customers.

Knowing who is talking to whom is an important part of Facebook's marketing. Look at how Facebook targets and consider item #19 in that article. It's not just about who you are, it's about who you know. Whether you think this is a good idea for Facebook or not, it is what they do.

User A and user B are friends in real life, use Whatsapp, and have Facebook accounts -- but they're not "friends" on Facebook (maybe they only use Facebook for work, or something like that). (Or maybe they don't have Facebook accounts, but Facebook has profiles on them gathered by "like" buttons, and has some way to deliver ads to at least one of them.) They communicate with each other using Whatsapp. This lets Facebook connect the two profiles, even though within Facebook alone, they are unconnected. The result: Now user A can see shopping ads for user B's upcoming birthday.

The advertiser has a good products experience.

Comment Re:Outsourcing vs Inhouse (Score 1) 252

This, and the tendency for company leadership to feel outsourcing means they can offload all responsibility for project success.

Something I've seen firsthand is companies that are pathologically incapable of making important decisions internally, and that is why they bring in a consultancy. Consultants go around to the various stakeholders (who can't agree on anything), gather requirements from each, then make recommendations. Despite the fact that the recommendations are basically a micro-model of the stakeholders' existing points of view and the result is the same no-win scenario the company was facing to begin with, the recommendations are acted upon, either in whole or in part. When the result is the same mess that would have inevitably happened even before the consultancy was brought in, at least now it's the consultants' fault that their recommendations didn't work out. Managers can then stir up a big stink when it's time to renegotiate the contract, they win some petty, unimportant concessions from the consultancy, and it's time to rinse and repeat.

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