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Comment Re:The results of any election or referendum.... (Score 1) 582

No... not at all... It is further entirely incorrect to assume that the people who do not vote intended to side with what the majority turned out to be.... at most you might assume that they intended to side with what they *believed* before the vote that the majority would actually vote for. Given how tight the actual vote was, it is a tenuous proposition to presume that what happened was actually what most people truly believed would happen. This may very well be true, but it is very nearly as likely (48% vs 52%, based on the vote outcome) that it is not, and a probability that close to 50% when there are only two choices makes it impossible to meaningfully infer or predict anything.

Thus, as I said... the results of the vote are simply the results of a democratic process... any similarity between the outcome and the actual will of the people may be fortunate, but is truly quite coincidental,

Comment Re:this is really getting tiring (Score 1) 200

But they're still there. What you've described constitutes deep and systematic racism and sexism that place serious obstacles in front of anyone who isn't the right race and gender. Just because no one is doing it "on purpose", that everyone has good intentions and thinks they're doing their best to be fair doesn't mean it isn't happening. It's the result of pervasive unconscious biases.

Prove it. Prove that's what's happening. You are making an extraordinary claim, you must justify it.

You described it! If you still can't see it, I can't help you.

Comment Re:this is really getting tiring (Score 1) 200

Because who gets promoted to management is entirely based on merit, right?

Sadly no. In my experience, who gets promoted to management has more to do with who you're friends with than actual ability.

Please note that gender and race were not mentioned *once* in the above.

But they're still there. What you've described constitutes deep and systematic racism and sexism that place serious obstacles in front of anyone who isn't the right race and gender. Just because no one is doing it "on purpose", that everyone has good intentions and thinks they're doing their best to be fair doesn't mean it isn't happening. It's the result of pervasive unconscious biases.

So, how do you overcome those unconscious biases, break the stranglehold of the good old boys' network on management positions (or a thousand other similar structures)? How do you root out the unconscious biases and make the people who hold them see that they do? Remember, these are well-intentioned people who consider themselves to be kind, and fair... but they just tend to hang out with their own kind, so that's who they know, and who gets promoted.

Serious question. What's your answer? Just letting the self-reinforcing system continue isn't a good one. So what do you do?

Comment Re:demo code (Score 1) 524

Also: I'll just hack up something quickly so the rest of the team has something to work with. I'll rewrite it properly later.

This actually comes from my experiences as a theatre tech guy, mostly relating to lighting design. I think it applies quite generally to projects where several people work in parallel, initially with little interprocess communication but increasingly interdependent until the grand premiere. The actors and the director will need some lights to get started, but I also need to see some action before doing the final design. The trick is making that initial quick hack good enough, so you never have to redesign from scratch, and I guess that takes some experience.

Comment Wrong Way (Score 1) 300

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in AT&T v. FTC that the FTC has no authority over common carriers. This FCC rule that Republicans got rid of filled the gap from that court decision.

So instead of going to the supreme court to fix yet another boneheaded decision from the 9th, someone decided to plaster over the bad mistake with an FCC ruling.

Which as it turns out is like patching holes in a roof with cotton candy - one wisp of rain and the protection is gone.

If someone wanted real protection why not try and pass a real law to do so, instead of jiggering the FCC to patch something wrong?

Comment Re:Tesla is gonna take over - believe me folks... (Score 1) 65

How much money they will save on gasoline is irrelevant if you live in an apartment or condo that doesn't have electrical outlets in each car stall, and the increased cost of moving into a brand new building that *has* those outlets could easily run to more than a thousand a year in higher mortgage payments.

Comment The results of any election or referendum.... (Score 3, Interesting) 582

... have nothing to do with "the wishes of the people". It is simply the outcome of the vote, and where voting is not mandatory, may reflect a disproportionately large representation of one particular view that is not actually held by the majority. Further, at most in only reflects how one person may have felt at the time that they voted, and may not reflect an informed decision they could be in a better position to determine at a later time.

While it is doubtless true that most voters that voted on the Brexit referendum did indeed vote to leave the EU, I am pretty sure that it is not what most people in Britain actually wanted. Calling it the "will of the people" is just balderdash. It is simply the outcome of the democratic process in this instance, nothing more and nothing less.

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