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Comment Opposite (Score 1) 73

The nanny-state would tend to mandate the WiFi stay locked for security reasons, or at least make sure people unlocking the WiFi were properly punished later by whatever means the state has (which are many).

In this actual case, it's private citizens calling for other private citizens for devices to be unlocked...

Comment More reliable, not less (Score 1) 114

One vector of "unreliability" the article talked about was iPhones "failing to connect to WiFi".

Let's just put aside the problem with equating network reliability with hardware reliability... there's a big difference in HOW both devices connect to WiFi, by design.

Apple in the last year or so changed iOS so that it will prefer to stay on a cell connection if it seems like the WiFi is going to be flaky or unreliable.

So the "WiFi failing to connect" is a result of the software making the network connection (you know, the whole reason why you are trying to connect to the WiFi in the first place?) MORE reliable for the user, not less... we all know by now sometimes the cell network is vastly better than a sketchy WiFi node.

Comment Re:What about other apps? (Score 1) 153

<quote><p>Does anyone keep metrics of which app drivers were using when they caused an accident?</p></quote>

In my jurisdiction, they do keep metrics on whether the operator was actively using the wireless connection involving user action on a phone at the time of an accident. (Phone calls, texting, playing games connected to the internet or an online server, etc).

In some cases it cannot be confirmed, so those are not counted as involving distracted driving via a wireless device, but in those where it can be, accidents causing injury and accidents causing death are higher than those caused by impaired driving (alcohol, drugs) and have been for approximately five years.

Comment The anti-science sure is odd. (Score 2, Insightful) 551

Yeah, I don't know why Slashdot attracts these anti-science nutters that cannot understand the data has been totally blown on the whole global warming scam. Yes some warming is occurring, but not enough to matter in any way worth even getting excited about - at least that's what the hard facts and careful research tell us. Heck it's probably not even enough to counteract the next global cooling phase which is close at hand even in human turns, then will be the time to panic...

Now the soft facts and panicked revelations made by so called "scientists" who are backed by governments trying to bilk the people into more central control - isn't it astounding that after literally decades of being utterly wrong about long term climate forecasts, people still listen to them? But then I guess it's not since other religions have been around thousands of years as well.

Comment Ahh, science (Score 1, Insightful) 551

Making the data fit the narrative since 1970.

I wonder when exactly we just start calling all science scientology? Vastly more accurate, what with the e-Meter like shifting uses of temperature data that has been so stretched and re-formed it's kind of a digital taffy now.

Comment Re:I've gone through four iPhones due to this issu (Score 2) 216

A "failure" here includes an app that crashes. In your case you're saying the touch screen has failed to work, 4 times in a row, and somehow you know it's about to be 5 times.

The chance of a failure involving the touchscreen is statistically (from the report you didn't read) 3%. Raising 0.03 to the fifth power gives a failure rate of 0.0000000243.

Still going with Occam.

Comment Re:I've gone through four iPhones due to this issu (Score 1) 216

Well, literally hundreds of millions of people (per year) buy iPhones (last 12 months was 215 million) and don't have this problem.

I could see you getting a bad phone - shit happens. I could (just about) see you getting *two* bad phones out of two. There is no way I'd buy that you got three successive phones that failed in the same way, as for five ? Well, I'll be charitable and say you must be the unluckiest person on the planet. Is your name Brian by any chance ?

For reference: "In line with the firm’s fourth-quarter report, a study that analyzed smartphone failures during the first quarter of 2016 determined that Android devices cause far more problems for their owners than iPhones. According to Blancco Technology Group’s new data, 44% of Android phones experienced failures between January and March of this year, compared to 25% of iPhones"

Occam's razor says I still think you don't look after the phone, assuming you're telling the truth. Sorry.

Comment Re:So much for Apple's "better design" (Score 1, Troll) 216

Yep, in an nutshell.

You sell 215 million (how many phones Apple sold in the last 12 months) of *anything*, and there's going to be a tiny percentage of them that go wrong in some pattern-like way. Even 0.001% of 215 million is 2150 people with a problem, and although a failure rate of 0.001% is pretty damn good with such a complex device, that's still enough for "many" people to come up with a common problem and someone to get some ad-revenue from the click-bait headline.

(Also own an iPhone, a 6+, and haven't seen any issues)

Comment Re:So much for Apple's "better design" (Score 0) 216

Oh for crying out loud.

There are literally (and I use the word correctly) *billions* of BGA chips out there, in all environments from the most benign to the harshest around, from industrial levels of vibration to space exploration (including the launch). Shock, horror, in a sample size that large, some of them fail, well cry me a river. There is no human technology that is 100% perfect, but soldering chips, yes, even BGA chips to boards is pretty damn close.

As for not doing them at home, I've done BGA chips at home many many times - you can actually do them with a toaster oven, but if you want a good (i.e.: ~100%) success rate, you could always get one of these. If you look past the truly egregious website, there's a really well engineered product there, which guarantees alignment as the chip is placed. I've got one and frankly I prefer doing a BGA chip than soldering a QFP by hand (of course the machine does QFP too...)

Inspection, now, that's a different beast. I've thought about getting an old dental XRAY machine off eBay, but who knows if it's strong enough. One day I'll remember to take one of my boards along to my dentist and get them to take a snapshot of it. At the moment, I'm too busy building a laser-cutter anyway.

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