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Comment Inline CSS above the fold (Score 1) 313

Nobody wants to be forced to use a desktop computer to see the whole web page.

I was thinking of a news site that shows photo, headline, and first paragraph to desktop or tablet users, but only the headline and a differently cropped photo to users of 6" or smaller devices. This way you can still fit as many stories into 320x440px.*

The real threat to bandwidth usage is [...] embedded CSS/Javascript in the HTML that can't be cached from page view to page view.

I thought additional HTTP 1.1 requests were more expensive than repeating any styles or scripts that block rendering of the first screen of the document. Google PageSpeed Insights recommends that web authors inline CSS above the fold.

* In CSS, px means roughly 1/2700 of the distance from the eye to the surface, rounded to the nearest hardware half-pixel.

Comment Re:UI chases fads (Score 1) 313

Also, True Type / Postscript / Web fonts still don't support color gradients.

And why should they? Fonts hold letter shapes

Because letter shapes in some styles of lettering are more complicated than a binary choice of "this set of points is inside the glyph" and "this set of points is outside the glyph". One example is a font used to represent the emoji characters in Unicode.

Comment Re:Accessibility options (Score 2) 313

CSS breakpoints make it possible to create a design and have it look consistent (not identical) across all possible screen sizes. You can have style/design/personality and still 100% fulfill that original vision of the web.

One thing you can't get with CSS breakpoints is efficient transmission of more detailed information to UAs with larger* screens and less detailed information to users with smaller screens. You have to send HTML containing both the more detailed information and the less detailed information and use display:none in CSS to hide one or the other depending on the breakpoint. Then the user has to pay up to $10/GB** to download the HTML of both, one to view and the other to throw away unread.

If they created a modern WebTV device now

Microsoft has had a modern WebTV device ever since the Xbox 360 added Internet Explorer.

* Measured in square ems, to be specific.
** Typical price of mobile Internet or satellite home Internet in the United States market.

Comment Re:Scripts on web pages, take ages to finish page. (Score 1) 313

Not all web browsers support ad blockers. Chrome for Android does not, for example. And even on those that do, the user ends up seeing notices like "Here's The Thing With Ad Blockers". I even get that on my laptop despite using only a tracking blocker, not an ad blocker.

Comment The eleventh page view used to cost $35 (Score 1) 40

The Times bought five thirty eight, and I can't detect any significant downgrade in the site.

Other than that the eleventh page view each month cost $35 for a digital subscription to Only when Disney bought it did the paywall drop. And I find Disney charging less for something to be unusual.

Comment Re:Dammit Nintendo (Score 1) 269

Online Wii games stopped working just a few years after they were released... why?

Two reasons. First, Wii online multiplayer matchmaking was through GameSpy, and GameSpy went out of business a little over a year after the Wii U was released. Second, GameSpy's library was linked statically into each Wii game, and Nintendo neglected to include a patching mechanism for disc games in IOS, the operating system of the Wii. Nor could it issue an update to IOS to allow this because of the Wii's anemic (0.5 GB) internal storage. (The same lack of space is why downloadable "channels" (applications) were limited to about 40 MB.) So even if it wanted to issue a patch to allow use of third-party game servers, it had no official means to do so.

I even miss the little world weather thing. I'd often pop in to just twirl the globe for a moment... it couldn't possibly cost anything significant to run the freakin' weather server, could it?

Yes. Licensing current conditions and forecasts from a commercial service with worldwide coverage costs money. Some national government agencies, such as the National Weather Service in the United States, provide without charge, but those are specific to each country, and integrating all countries' weather information also costs engineering time=money.

Comment Re:Dammit Nintendo (Score 1) 269

Online gaming is a cancer and blight upon the world, anyway. Proper multiplayer is splitscreen or LAN.

After you've graduated and your classmates have moved away, good luck finding partners for "Proper multiplayer" in your home town. How is that usually done, especially for people like me who don't drink alcohol and whose coworkers are non-gamers?

Comment Re:Dammit Nintendo (Score 1) 269

Anyone still on cable can get their DVR through the cable company.

True, cable and satellite offer whole-house DVR. But a lot of people using antenna+Netflix aren't willing to upgrade to cable or satellite TV just to be able to record episodes that are on antenna but not Netflix, nor are they willing to pay $600 over the life of a TiVo DVR for the required service.

Not that it's Nintendo's responsibility to provide DVR functionality or anything.

Comment Not all baseball matches are MLB matches (Score 2) 62

Don't challenge MLB if you know what's good for you.

I don't know what you're getting at because "challenge MLB" can have any of several meanings. If you start your own league unaffiliated with MLB, do you "challenge MLB"?

Major League Baseball has copyright over broadcasts of matches between MLB clubs or between clubs in MLB-affiliated minor leagues. It does not have copyright over broadcasts of baseball matches in other leagues. Video game publishers, on the other hand, control which leagues are even allowed to exist.

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