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Submission + - Malibu Media stay lifted, motion to quash denied

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the federal court for the Eastern District of New York, where all Malibu Media cases have been stayed for the past year, the Court has lifted the stay and denied the motion to quash in the lead case, thus permitting all 84 cases to move forward. In his 28-page decision (PDF), Magistrate Judge Steven I. Locke accepted the representations of Malibu's expert, one Michael Patzer from a company called Excipio, that in detecting BitTorrent infringement he relies on "direct detection" rather than "indirect detection", and that it is "not possible" for there to be misidentification.

Comment Re:Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial jud (Score 1) 23

Actually whoever the new guy is, I don't find the site to be "improved" at all; seems a little crummy. The story was butchered and incorrectly interpreted, and the all important software for interaction seems less interactive.

But what do I know?

As to my absence I've been a bit overwhelmed by work stuff, sorry about that, it's no excuse :)

Comment Actually 3rd point was agreement with trial judge (Score 4, Informative) 23

The story as published implies that the ruling overruled the lower court on the 3 issues. In fact, it was agreeing with the trial court on the third issue -- that the sporadic instances of Vimeo employees making light of copyright law did not amount to adopting a "policy of willful blindness".

Submission + - Appeals court slams record companies on DMCA in Vimeo case

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the long-simmering appeal in Capitol Records v. Vimeo, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit upheld Vimeo's positions on many points regarding the Digital Millenium Copyright Act. In its 55 page decision (PDF) the Court ruled that (a) the Copyright Office was dead wrong in concluding that pre-1972 sound recordings aren't covered by the DMCA, (b) the judge was wrong to think that Vimeo employees' merely viewing infringing videos was sufficient evidence of "red flag knowledge", and (c) a few sporadic instances of employees being cavalier about copyright law did not amount to a "policy of willful blindness" on the part of the company. The Court seemed to take particular pleasure in eviscerating the Copyright Office's rationales. Amicus curiae briefs in support of Vimeo had been submitted by a host of companies and organizations including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Computer & Communications Industry Association, Public Knowledge, Google, Yahoo!, Facebook, Microsoft, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Twitter.

Comment Re:Rant: REBOOT the WEB (Score 2) 243

Because everyone has perfect sight, wants the same size browser window as the developer, browses at 100% zoom level, with the same fonts, on the same screen resolution, with the same sub-pixel rendering, right? Sure, we're all machines.

Those silly users with their 4K screens should just set them all to 1366x768 like the crappiest notebook LCDs! Jaggies forever! Screw mobile users, damn hipsters can get stuffed.

You're right. Fuck screen readers, accessibility, personalization and anyone with even the slightest disability (colourblind? Sure, we've got burnt umber on light green for you!). Because the designer's view of perfection is what everyone should see, dammit, even if they can't read a word. Design over function.

Of course, if you're being sarcastic, then sure. But you might want to make it more obvious.

Comment Re:As with so many "is it time" questions... no. (Score 2) 566

They're not that non-standard. Lots of them are USB3 nowadays, and the prices aren't THAT insane (e.g. $100-$300 depending what you need).

I've had a comparable one for my notebook and work notebook, it's two cables to be up and working with the high-res screen, mouse, keyboard, anything else USB and a GbE. It's almost easier than a model-specific dock because you don't have to work out where the locating pins go (but you do need to deal with the 4-dimensional USB connector). It's a short step from that to USB 3.1 single cable, with the dock delivering power and connectivity, and I fully expect Targus or their ilk to produce a "one size for all" - an adapter for the notebook power into the dock, and a single USB to the notebook.

Comment Re:Why conceal it? (Score 1) 740

Then where, exactly, should the information be provided? Does each product need to come with a paper leaflet? Do you assume all consumers have ubiquitous Internet access such that they can hit the company website to see what's in a product? Or should they all register all product recipes with a central government agency? In my experience if a company isn't forced to toe the line like this, the ingredients will be listed on the back of a tomato sauce sachet in 1pt yellow on white type, which can be found "on display in the the cellar, in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet, stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard." [Douglas Adams, paraphrased].

Comment Re:When is it going to be free (Score 2) 84

It's called LetsEncrypt. You only have to turn over appropriate access to your server to client software (even though to trust it you'd have to review the code or write it yourself). And your web server has to be able to access the LE servers, so you (currently at least) have to permit outbound access from a device providing the website (there are larger configs where you could mitigate that somewhat but this is the simple case).

The client hits the LE servers, gets a string to write to a server-specified location (/.well-known/acme-challenge/URI). Oh, and that retrieval by LE is done over HTTP, so there's NO chance that could ever be subverted.

Comment Re:Google knocks Apple, Bing and Microsoft (Score 4, Insightful) 84

And because we need to ~double the amount of data used by all the hamster forums, cat videos and aircraft curation guides, especially when a lot of the world's users are on slow or data-limited connections?

Look. I get that it's good to ensure that there's no injected content, and that you know you're connected to the site you want - but that's only true for 1% of the population. The rest of the world wouldn't know the difference between https://www.example.com/member... and https://www.example.com.member.... Both "secure" because they're HTTPS, right?

Factor in all the browsers deciding that privately-signed sites are worse than plain http, that no-one needs to actually SEE the protocol, or the URL, that all the certs are issued by a cabal of companies who just see the benefit of charging for a NUMBER, but barely doing validation ... but sure. "Adding security". Right.

Comment Re:A solution in search of a problem.. (Score 2) 111

That's a ~95% solved problem and has been for decades. Room key on thick plastic block, block goes in a cradle inside the door, activating power to the room. Pull the key to leave and everything goes off.

Worked in the 90's at least when I started traveling for work, and it wasn't just in big city hotels then. Perspex blocks don't have to be smudge-free, don't need extra power of their own, won't break down, are significantly cheaper, can't be trivially hacked to screw with every other room in the hotel - no this is a solution looking for a problem.

Comment Re:Righthaven (Score 1) 67

What is right wing about filing a lawsuit to unmask a doe, suing that person, then settling for a much smaller amount. It seems this is used by many different trolls, and likely doesn't have any political ideology behind it. It is sleazy though. Filing a lawsuit with the intention of settling just to get a payout is wrong. It is short circuiting the justice system for personal profit.

Yeah that's neither right nor left, it's the universal language of greedy bloodsuckers.

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