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Comment Silly Putty was miraculous (Score 4, Funny) 25

I can still recall the day I learned that you could copy a frame from the Sunday comics by pressing silly putty onto it. I thought that was the coolest thing ever.

Any time they want to mix it with graphene and inject it into my blood stream, I'm ready. I haven't seen a piece of Silly Putty in decades, but I can still recall its smell vividly. I loved that stuff. I think my childhood dog Smokey ate an entire Silly Putty once and crapped it out unchanged. I think it still had the image of Smokey Stover on it.

Comment Re:Or it might go up (Score 1) 458

Your citation shows higher poverty 2009-2015 than 2001-2008. More people have been impoverished under Obama than before.

Tell you what, Chris: People can look at the graph for themselves and see that poverty has been steadily declining since the end of the recession. And right now, poverty is lower than it was the year Obama took office.

The poverty rate today is also almost exactly where it was when Ronald Reagan left office.

Comment Who's to say? (Score 4, Insightful) 72

"How do we know this radiation isn't actually good for you? I mean, the Sun's heat is radiation, right?"

- Trump's new director of the Department of Energy.

[Note: If you think I'm somehow exaggerating, you might find tonight's story about Trump's new Department of Energy "enemies list" an interesting read:}

https://www.washingtonpost.com...

Comment The electoral college is already 60% dead (Score 1) 450

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... about the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, the Electoral College is already on it's last legs. If states with at least 105 more Electoral College votes adopt this compact, then the Electoral College will have been eliminated. No need to amend the Constitution.

Yours was one of the more insightful posts mentioning the Electoral College, though it received no favorable mods. Typical for today's Slashdot. Your sig was interesting, however.

Comment And who shall rate those self-same raters? (Score 2) 9

Seriously, unless the personal reputation of the raters as actual human beings is taken into account, then the system will be worthless. There has to be symmetry between the reliability of the raters for their ratings to have any reliability.

Almost all of these systems get polluted by gamesters and trolls, often using sock puppets. I'm not saying that anonymity needs to be eliminated, but if you do elect to be anonymous, then your opinions should be discounted as not really representing your public position. However in a situation like this, I do think that anonymous raters should be discounted to zero.

However, I've made basically the same argument as regards fixing the Slashdot moderation system. Haven't noticed any progress yet.

Comment Re:Why go for a simple majority? (Score 1) 615

This is the other one of only two comments to mention this obvious solution, and neither one of them was moderated upwards. Slashdot really has fallen on hard times, eh? This approach would effectively eliminate the Electoral College, and is already more than halfway to becoming effective (as measured by Electoral College votes that have been committed to it).

Again, it appears that no karma bonus was used. Why not?

Should I complain that my comment about the coalition government solution was also ignored? Or just put it on the list of hard-times-at-Slashdot-and-no-one-cares?

On reflection, I do have one more thought about my earlier comment. I think the Judicial branch would be better off as a pure meritocracy with as little political (AKA partisan) political involvement as possible. One approach might be to nominate judges for promotion based on objective metrics of their judicial performance. The judges whose opinions are most often cited by other judges and whose decisions are least often overturned would be the top candidates. When a vacancy appears on a higher court, the top few candidates, perhaps 5, would automatically be considered for the position, and only if all of them were rejected for the promotion (and I find it hard to imagine why that would ever happen) would the process be opened up for other candidates.

I actually think one benefit of this kind of system is that the top judges would tend to be older and therefore not stay in place for so long. Then again, I don't think it would be bad to include special criteria that do favor younger judges, as long as the criteria are applied impartially. Perhaps reduce the penalty if a young judge is overturned, counting it as a learning experience? Or give extra credit for younger judges who spent some time teaching at law schools? Maybe even consider teaching at a law school as counting as much as being a judge in terms of judicial seniority?

Comment Re:Imaginary benefits of social media advertising (Score 1) 35

I work in the marketing analytics and attribution space and can confidently speak to this topic. While Social isn't the BEST performer, it doesn't carry with it the dire statement of a "complete lack of results" as you state.

With dependencies on vertical and how the advertising is used in known conjunction with other channels, Social definitely does have an assister effect on those other channels. The problem you may be encountering is relying solely on outdated analysis methods which do not appropriately track credit for known users across the entirety of their path to purchase or you're simply just looking at in effective ad buying behavior resulting in poor ROAS.

Done right, Social is definitely valuable for relatively low cost when compared to the much larger channels (based on investment) and can absolutely jack up your return on those other channels as an assister but definitely is not going to be a 1:1 return as the only advertising channel you should leverage if you are hoping for conversion.

Comment Either that or (Score 1) 8

It pulls the chumps off of Wall Street to work in relatively economically harmless cabinet positions, thus allowing a new generation to take over on Wall Street producing a boom.

The Peter Principle- it still could work.

Comment Re:Google, Motorola, Intel . . . (Score 1) 262

I have lived in Kansas for about 27 years, so I guess that makes my opinion at least as valid as the opinion piece from a Kansas City, MISSOURI newspaper

No, not really. The Kansas City, MISSOURI newspaper actually included evidence.

As for the other, you're just flat out wrong. Did you know that since Brownback and company took over in 2012, Kansas GDP (GSP) has grown half as fast as the national GDP?

http://www.cbpp.org/research/f...

Second, did you know that you can't trust any of the economic numbers that have been coming out of the Brownback administration? Here's why:

https://www.bloomberg.com/view...

http://www.rawstory.com/2016/0...

And since you seemed offended that I would cite a MISSOURI newspaper that is all of about 15 feet from the Kansas border, here's some fact-checking from a Wichita, KANSAS newspaper that you might find illuminating. Oh never mind, you're from Kansas. You wouldn't find anything illuminating. What's the matter with Kansas, anyway?

http://www.kansas.com/news/pol...

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