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Submission + - 10 Percent of the World's Wilderness Has Been Lost Since 1990s (livescience.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Wilderness areas around the world have experienced catastrophic declines over the last two decades, with one-tenth of global wilderness lost since the 1990s, according to a new study. Since 1993, researchers found that a cumulative wilderness area twice the size of Alaska and half the size of the Amazon has been stripped and destroyed. The shrinking wilderness is due, in part, to human activity such as mining, logging, agriculture, and oil and gas exploration. The researchers said theirfindings underscore the need for international policies to recognize the value of wilderness and to protect wilderness areas from the threats they face. Central Africa and the Amazon saw the most wilderness decline, the researchers found. Of the roughly 1.27 million square miles (3.3 million square kilometers) of global wilderness lost, the Amazon accounted for nearly one-third, and 14 percent of the world's wilderness was lost from Central Africa, according to the study. The researchers determined that only 11.6 million square miles (30.1 million square km) of wilderness is left, which equates to just 20 percent of the Earth's total land mass.

Submission + - General Motors Recalls 4.3 Million Vehicles Over A Software Bug (gizmodo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: If you own a GM vehicle from 2014-2017, listen up: General Motors is recalling nearly 4.3 million vehicles worldwide after discovering a software defect that prevents air bags from deploying during a crash. The software bug may also prevent the seat belts from locking properly. The flaw has already been linked to one death and three injuries. Vehicles affected by the recall include 2014-2016 car models of the Buick LaCross, Chevy SS, and Chevy Spark EVs. It also includes 2014-2017 models of the Buick Encore, GMC Sierra, Chevy Corvette, Chevy Trax, Chevy Caprice, Chevy Silverado. Additionally, the recall affects 2015-2017 models of the Chevy Tahoe, Chevy Silverado HD, Chevy Suburban, GMC Yukon, GMC Yukon XL, GMC Sierra HD, Cadillac Escalade, and Cadillac Escalade ESV. GM will notify owners of affected vehicles and update the software for free, according to the NHTSA.

Submission + - Facebook caves in on Vietnam war photo censorship. (www.cbc.ca)

BarbaraHudson writes: After also deleting the Norweigian Prime Minister's post which was made in protest of Facebook censoring the phote, CBC reports that Facebook has reversed its' position.

Facebook on Friday reversed its decision to remove postings of an iconic 1972 image of a naked, screaming girl running from a napalm attack in Vietnam, after a Norwegian revolt against the tech giant.

Protests in Norway started last month after Facebook deleted the Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut from a Norwegian author's page, saying it violated its rules on nudity.

The revolt escalated on Friday when Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg posted the image on her profile and Facebook deleted that too.


Submission + - The government vs the people of Louisiana

schwit1 writes: During the recent flooding in Louisiana, it was repeatedly the government vs ordinary citizens as people scrambled to deal with the disaster.

The government was repeatedly in the way and working to prevent people from helping themselves. In fact, it often seemed more interested in collecting fees and paperwork than allowing people to be rescued or homes to be rebuilt.

Comment They should go through some ship's journals (Score 2) 176

... Or perhaps even better: sailors' personal diaries. Mankind has been exploring this planet for millennia. Every sea-faring nation sent out explorer ships at one time or another. Groups of men packed onto a boat with little privacy, not knowing whether they'd ever reach a destination or what they'd find. With the constant danger of disease, water / food / vitamin shortages, going overboard in a storm, fights with fellow sailors, etc etc. And no communication with the outside world for months.

Plenty of historic reports to pick from, plenty examples of how sailors would (or wouldn't?) cope on such journeys. Never mind that in comparison to an ocean-going vessel, a 'habitat' on some remote island is a pretty controlled environment.

Comment Re:Travelling at 20% of the speed of light (Score 1) 218

I love the whole "it's only 20 years if you travel at 20% of the speed of light!" part. It makes it sound so close.

What's a human lifetime, anyway? Insignificant.

Let's say we set the bar a few orders of magnitude lower. Say, 0.15% the speed of light. Leave around the time the ancient pyramids of Egypt were built, arrive today.

Now pick something in between. Say, 1% the speed of light. One-way trip ~425 years. Is it so hard to imagine that in a # of decades, we might have probes able to accelerate to that speed? Now replace 'probe' with 'city-sized starship'. Something big enough to allow generations of people to grow up & have offspring. Decades of technological progress not enough? How about a century from now? Or 2 centuries?

In other words: all we need is patience, and imagination. And (as mankind) not be stupid enough to blow ourselves up before those spaceships are on their way. As long as travel group can sit out the ride, who cares if the actual trip time is 20, 200 or 2000 years.

Comment Re:TTL (Score 1) 179

I'm guessing that time to live is more important than having everything looking pretty with your i's dotted and t's crossed.

Absolutely. If TTL is set too low, data packets won't make it back to NSA's servers. But for NSA peeps reading this: do make sure to avoid TTL in the electronics! It's lethal for your spying device battery life.

Comment Run your own cell? (Score 2) 90

If 5G is all about short distances, why wouldn't people run their own cells? Kind of like running an open Wi-Fi spot.

For technologies that work over long(er) distances, it's -somewhat- logical that you can't put up your own cell tower. If everybody did that, some would stick to standards and some would not. And soon enough you'd have a free-for-all making the spectrum band(s) useless.

And thus we have (some) government regulation on who gets to use the spectrum & how. Auctioning it off to providers who rig up city- or nationwide networks. But what do you pay a provider for:

a) For maintaining the infrastructure. When everybody puts up their own 'micro-cell tower', no need to pay a 3rd party for maintaining it.

b) For connecting it to upstream (wired) infrastructure. But when those upstream connections have to run all the way to your front door anyway, you can do that yourself right? Again, same as in-home Wi-Fi routing to your internet connection.

c) For user-sharing on those networks, billing, network performance monitoring, etc. Again: when it's all short-distance anyway, no need for that, can be done decentralized by end users. Users that don't play by the rules, can only mess with the spectrum in their immediate area.

Yes you'd still need some standards to enable users to move from micro-cell to micro-cell seamlessly. And use the spectrum in a way that minimizes interference for users that are close to each other. But this is mostly a matter of putting some puzzle-pieces together & declare some de facto standards that every user can follow, right? (in the usual case, baked into consumer devices & their firmware).

'5G' coverage would then simply depend on how interested people in an area are in putting up their routers / antenna's etc. Or am I missing something here?

Comment Re:Really? (Score 1) 140

Following the general consensus, I'm sure the US Department of Defense has come to the same conclusion, and is re-directing their resources as we speak.

To anyone who lives / works near there: can you please look out the window & check if Twitter HQ is being bombed already? Thx for keeping us up to date!

Comment Let's hope this won't be default behaviour (Score 1) 119

For several reasons:

a) Any attempt to access a non-existing page that results in showing a page anyway, is basically fooling the user. Some (ehm.. read: many) users may even think that page still exists even though the original is gone. From a UI perspective that's just wrong even if convenient in many cases.

b) Access to old / archived versions of pages often comes in handy. And that is what the Internet Archive is for. But sometimes pages (or sites) are pulled for a reason. Sometimes good reason(s). Not all information ever placed on the internet needs to be preserved forever, imho.

c) If every 404 leads to a request to the Internet Archive, can they handle the extra load? Even if so, would the extra bandwidth / CPU / disk IO etc be a good use of the IA's limited resources? I very much doubt that, and perhaps Firefox maintainers should answer that question first before activating such a feature by default.

As one of many add-ons: sure why not. As a default feature: bad idea imho.

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