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Comment questionable (Score 4, Insightful) 326

HCL may be India-based, but it's going to be hard to prove that this is offshoring. HCL has a lot of US operations. It's practically a subsidiary of Microsoft in the US, in fact. They definitely employ a lot of people in the US. So they may be able to pass it off as simply outsourcing rather than offshoring of their operations. It's going to come down to personal accounts of who were the replacements whom the laid-off workers were training. If they are US residents, this isn't likely to go anywhere.

Comment Re:speak ENGLISH WILL YA? (Score 1) 83

It's not in the dictionary. Both MW and AH list it as "chiefly British". So it's not normative usage. It is without any doubt whatsoever not a literary word, nor a word recognized by the majority of English speakers as a reference to footwear.

That got your point across well enough before making yourself look foolish.

Yeah, that's how we got to "Nature" allowing itself to use "maths" as an accepted usage. That was my line in the sand. Its existence changes the impression of what is "math" for those who use "math" as a the normative short form. I may know the difference and you most likely do, too. But those who do not, get the wrong view on the world as described by the word. And the fact that even "Nature" allows itself this usage in the article titles shows just how far this has gone. British English is no more normative for standard English than German is normative for Germanic languages. In fact, British English is a dialect of the standard English similarity in the names notwithstanding.

Comment Re:speak ENGLISH WILL YA? (Score 1) 83

Why stop at Britishisms then? Why not just go with some Liverpool localisms while describing global events for global audiences? I don't think "if a word is not in the dictionary, it should not be used to describe international events to audiences mainly situated in other countries" is too much to ask of an editor of a major publication.

Comment Re:speak ENGLISH WILL YA? (Score 1) 83

Little tip for you: English is the language of England

Little tip for you: German (or maybe Russian) would be the language of England if it weren't for the US. British English is cute, at best. Proper American pronunciation is universally considered the normative English pronunciation. And so is proper American usage. Oh, and that little "blessed" plot, that realm -- The England -- would long know no King or Queen were it not for the generosity and spirit of these colonials it formerly thought to subjugate.

Comment good year to do it (Score 1) 205

The last big Hollywood strike happened in 2008 and it brought us a very, very robust presidential primary season. Everyone watch Democratic and Republican primary debates instead of scripted TV. This Summer there is no upcoming election to speak of (not even a midterm one). So there is no alternative sources of entertainment on TV. Might be a boon for video games though. Yes, I know people can turn off and go outside, but they can do it even if there is no strike. Only a very small percentage will make lifestyle changes in response to withdrawal of a certain stimulus. They are more likely to seek an alternative stimuli which are as close to the original as possible. And the network executives are perfectly aware of that. So they will most likely cave in to the writers demands.

Comment Re:speak ENGLISH WILL YA? (Score 1, Informative) 83

I fail to see the downside here. It's also not slang, it's just the word we use.

It's a word used by a small minority of English speakers. It's not a literary word. It's a slang used when talking to an audience which has not idea what it is. And it was used in the title of an article about a global company -- not a local event (which might have justified the usage). In the US it's considered British slang. It will not show up if you try to look it up by typing "define trainers" in Google search bar. If you try to lookup "soda" in the same manner (which is a colloquialism for "carbonated water", but not a slang), you will get a definition.

Comment here's an idea (Score 1) 119

Instead of going off on tangent projects, get back to basics and fix Android. Why the hell do Google-branded phones (not just Android, but Google-branded Android) lose apps and panels on update? I lost count how many near-accidents I had because of the free Google navigation app. Fix the the core business before you off on your tangent projects.

Comment speak ENGLISH WILL YA? (Score 1, Insightful) 83

"Trainers" is British slang. It is not used in any part of the largest country in which English is the majority language. If you want to use a region-neutral word, go with "athletic shoes". But the most commonly-used and universally understood colloquialism is sneakers. I promise you that "trainers" is not just something that sounds British in the US. This isn't like "coke" vs "pop" vs "soda". "Trainers" will make majority of Americans reach for a dictionary, find out that it's a British usage, and then wonder why the hell was the editor publishing this for international audience not fired yet.

Comment Re:Amazing how Republicans talk out of both sides. (Score 1) 307

What police state? This makes it more likely that people will route all their traffic through encrypted tunnels to VPNs. This makes surveillance more complicated. Any additional to cyclotomic complexity of the traffic increases the expense of surveillance. So this actually would force more people in the US to complicate the job of surveilling people in the US. That doesn't sound like a push towards a police state.

Comment Re:Korolev was purged (Score 1) 78

He was completely unknown during the space race. His identity hidden.

Yeah, top secret is more like it.

then released under Khrushchev.

And that's when the space race actually started. Many members of the Politburo did a stint at the Gulag under Stalin. Including some of the top brass of the army, if my memory is not failing. In itself, it's not very telling. Any slight disagreement with those high-enough in power was enough to get a few years in the Gulag's (if one was lucky).

Ultimately this cost them the race to the moon. Korolev's mistreatment in the Gulags lead to his early death, after which their space program collapsed. A very Soviet story.

Oy! This is just not even connected to reality. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.... Korolev was released in 1944 (still during WWII and long before Stalin's death).

Here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.... Baikonur was founded in 1955, which was after Stalin's death. The first launch of a dog was in 1957: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.... See how the timeline just doesn't add up to the whole idea that he was stopped by the Gulag? Soviet Union was still rebuilding from WWII under Stalin. The space program didn't start until Korolev started it. Gulag was hardly the reason for his death. He had multiple heart attacks by then and died at 59. Soviet life expectancy for men was just slightly over 60 (62 or so). For someone in a job with as much stress as he had this was actually pretty good. Soviet Union had famous actors (more than one) die on stage in their 40s.

Personally, I always wondered why the Soviets did not just send a cosmonaut to moon one way.

They abandoned the program as unworkable. Which is to say they didn't have anyone who could produce a design.

Btw, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... was released 1972 -- only 6 years after Korolev's death. He was already a well-known larger-than-life figure at that point (eg, he was already on a postage stamp in 1969). His identity was not declassified for obvious security reasons until his obituary was published. His ashes were laid next to those of all top Communist leaders. He had a private plane and all the accommodations of top military brass in the last 10 years of his life. The radio station they built in Evpatoria was most likely not for technical reasons sited in the Wikipedia. Evpatoria was the top vacation destination in the Soviet Union. The radio station was most likely built to make it more convenient for Korolev.

To sum up: he had all the accommodations of top Soviet brass without the burden of having to play an action hero for public consumption. Not quite a victim this "article" makes him out to be.

Comment Re:Not "the rocket designer" (Score 1) 78

"designed" is a strong word. This was done at the time when all calculations were done by hand. So most people on the team were doing verifying arithmetic. But there was, of course, a large group of designers. Korolev created both the original rocket concept and the political savvy to get the government to approve and get behind the project. But without his rocket design, there would be no project.

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