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Comment Re:powers (Score 1) 212

Granting them the authority to passively scan wireless traffic, identify the location of the WAP, and then providing that information to the police is fine with me. I mean, still stupid, but legally/morally fine.

So long as that's all they get to do. If they are allowed to be judge, jury and executioner as well instead of passing off evidence to the legal system, that's a big problem.

Comment It's of limited use unless... (Score 1) 263

You can get a permit for outfitting it with some kind of area-denial device within your presumably fenced and clearly marked property.

If it can emit a painful ultrasonic shriek, fire off an omni-directional microwave that makes your skin feel like it's on fire, or blink a bajillion-candle strobe in your face to temporarily blind you... then it's suddenly useful.

Comment Re:Arbitrage (Score 1) 240

IF:

* the app had configurable limits for local storage and purchases

* it started with non-RIAA artists only (yes, painful, but worth it in the long run if you survive)

* it had a rating system with novelty, similarity, and unique user request frequency per day

* it cut out Amazon - have your own secured cloud service

* you charge for a resync (it's only fair, to cover your storage and bandwidth costs), keep the cost low but still profitable. Bandwidth and storage aren't that expensive.

THEN I think you could have a winner. An industry-toppling winner, actually... if you managed to make it work at all. I expect at first you'd try and be the go-to distribution method for tiny little bands just starting up and it'd be difficult to get new listeners when most people just want the pop top 30.

Still, it's important to cut out the RIAA and entities like Amazon right from the start or they will take all the profits while you starve and fail.

Submission + - Language Creation Society says Klingon language isn't covered by copyright

AmiMoJo writes: Earlier this year Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios filed a lawsuit against the makers of a Star Trek inspired fan film, accusing them of copyright infringement. In their amicus brief, which actually uses Klingon language, the Language Creation Society lists many examples of how Klingon has evolved, and it specifically disputes Paramount’s earlier claims that there are no human beings who communicate using the Klingon language. “In fact, there are groups of people for whom Klingon is their only common language. There are friends who only speak Klingon to each other. In fact, at least one child was initially raised as a native speaker of Klingon." As such, Paramount should not be allowed to claim copyright over the entire Klingon language, both in written and spoken form. The language is a tool for people to communicate and express ideas, something people should be allowed to do freely under U.S. law, LCS argues.

Paramount's copyright claims have already started to having a chilling effect on Star Trek fan series. Star Trek Continues is currently running a fundraiser campaign to produce more episodes, and in a video message Vic Mignogna, who plays Kirk, mentions that fans have been unwilling to support them due to fears over legal action. The campaign has 5 days to left to go, and the team is trying to reach a reduced goal of $200k, down from the original $300k they were hoping for.

Comment Re:AnonSec = Attempted Murderers (Score 3, Interesting) 133

More or less. There is no acceptable or even pseudo-acceptable justification for this attack.

There's no secret conspiracy uncovered, no risk to national security the government won't admit to or fix, just NASA doing what they're supposed to be doing.

And these idiots deciding to try and fuck it up as best they can because they can. A lengthy stay in prison without access to electronics might just be what they need to smarten up. If not, at least they'll have less opportunity to cause trouble for a while.

Comment Re:Apple is overdue (Score 2) 428

>Outside of VR

If Apple wants to put out the iReality, a high definition stereo heads-up display with 3-axis motion detection, and some decent stereo speakers, I don't care if it's an overpriced bit of shiny white plastic with an inaccessible battery. Just because it's Apple there's a good chance it'd be a significant boost for the VR market.

If Apple wants to put out iGlasses and make a Google Glass equivalent that people would actually wear, that'd be awesome too. Not because I'd wear them (they'd inevitably be overly thick white plastic with a prominent Apple logo on them...) but because the knock-offs would have to be far better than what's available today to be at all competitive, and I'd wear one of them.

Comment Re:There's still a delay (Score 1) 287

I expect it'd be more something you'd have installed closed, and only ever open it if and when you decide you want to have children, then close again once your significant other was pregnant.

It's a shame we aren't at a tech level where we could just genetically engineer disabled sperm production until we injest a specific chemical to trigger it.

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