DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 Internet speed test! ×

Submission + - Interesting New Movie Review Concept (slashcomment.com)

Agrajag27 writes: slashcomment.com (no relationship to slashdot) is run by two venerable writers from the games industry who morphed into movie reviewers over the last several years. They created a new take on movie reviews they call /chart. It's an intriguing new way to look at films that's far more in touch with today's audience than your typical 1,200 word, tell-all review. These charts track the reviewer in real-time as they're watching the screening of the film. The result is a useful chart that conveys a ton of data in one quick look. Is the film a slow-burn? Does it suffer from major plot holes? Does it offer content during the credits? Where's the best time to go get a drink? How often does it evoke emotion? Does it end on a positive note or drop the ball at the last moment?

Each chart is surprisingly unique and coupled with concise reviews for those who want them. It's the first real advance in movie reviewing since the thumbs up/down concept. Each review for the last year or two has a chart (they're even adding charts for old reviews/films) and you can find a complete library of existing charts here:

https://slashcomment.com/movie...

Submission + - Hate doing email follow-up? Then You'll Love Rebump (rebump.cc)

Peter Geisheker writes: Rebump is a Gmail extension that makes it fast and easy to send automated follow-up messages to people you send important email messages to for the purpose of reminding them to open and respond to your email. If you want to make sure the people you send your email to actually open, read, and respond to your email, get the Rebump Gmail extension at rebump.cc.

Submission + - Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing' (yahoo.com)

boley1 writes: Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing situation'.

According to Musk, the main challenges with flying cars are that they'll be noisy and generate lots of wind because of the downward force required to keep them in the air. Plus, there's an anxiety factor.

"Let's just say if something is flying over your head...that is not an anxiety-reducing situation," he said. "You don’t think to yourself 'Well, I feel better about today. You’re thinking'Is it going to come off and guillotine me as it comes flying past?'

Submission + - Inclusion Done Right in a World of Rampant Sexism: An Engineer's Perspective (thenewstack.io)

An anonymous reader writes: “I can’t tell you what a joy it is to go to work and just do my job.” Christina Noren’s words stopped me cold. After the storm stirred up by Susan Fowler’s February blog post, and the revelation of the depth of sexisim in the tech industry, this was an astounding statement.

What is it like to work at a company that gets not just diversity, but inclusion right? Not just as a C-level or VP-level perch, but from an engineer’s perspective, which, at the end of the day is the most important one. Were there more companies who have figured this out? And, most importantly, what were they doing those other companies could learn from?

Submission + - WikiLeaks Reveals The "Snowden Stopper": CIA Tool To Track Whistleblowers (zerohedge.com)

schwit1 writes: As the latest installment of it's 'Vault 7' series, WikiLeaks has just dropped a user manual describing a CIA project known as ‘Scribbles’ (a.k.a. the "Snowden Stopper"), a piece of software purportedly designed to allow the embedding of ‘web beacon’ tags into documents “likely to be stolen.” The web beacon tags are apparently able to collect information about an end user of a document and relay that information back to the beacon's creator without being detected. Per WikiLeaks' press release

But, the "Scribbles" user guide notes there is just one small problem with the program...it only works with Microsoft Office products. So, if end users use other programs such as OpenOffice of LibreOffice then the CIA's watermarks become visible to the end user and their cover is blown.

Submission + - Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments (theatlantic.com)

ISayWeOnlyToBePolite writes: The Atlantic reports https://www.theatlantic.com/sc... that Viviane Slon from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and her colleagues have now managed to extract and sequence the DNA of ancient animals from sediment thatâ(TM)s up to 240,000 years old. By creating a molecule that binds to mammal DNA they have been able to sort out Denisovan, Neanderhal, mammoths, woolly rhinos, and cave bears from cave sediments at a previously unprecidented scale. Paywalled science article http://science.sciencemag.org/...

Submission + - Lawsuit: Fox News Group Hacked, Surveilled, and Stalked Ex-Hose Andrea Tantaros (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Comparing their actions to the plot this season on the Showtime series Homeland, an attorney for former Fox News host Andrea Tantaros has filed a complaint in federal court against Fox News, current and former Fox executives, Peter Snyder and his financial firm Disruptor Inc., and 50 "John Doe" defendants. The suit alleges that collective participated in a hacking and surveillance campaign against her. Tantaros filed a sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News in August of 2016, after filing internal complaints with the company about harassment dating back to February of 2015. She was fired by the network in April of 2016, as Tantaros continued to press complaints against Fox News' then-Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes, Bill O'Reilly, and others. Tantaros had informed Fox that she would be filing a lawsuit over the alleged sexual harassment. Tantaros claims that as early as February of 2015, a group run out of a "black room" at Fox News engaged in surveillance and electronic harassment of her, including the use of "sock puppet" social media accounts to electronically stalk her. Tantaros' suit identifies Peter Snyder and Disruptor Inc. as the operators of a social influence operation using "sock puppet" accounts on Twitter and other social media.

Submission + - NASA officially delays SLS first flight to 2019 (arstechnica.com)

schwit1 writes: Despite spending almost $19 billion and more than thirteen years of development, NASA today admitted that it will have to delay the first test flight of the SLS rocket from late 2018 to sometime in 2019.

“We agree with the GAO that maintaining a November 2018 launch readiness date is not in the best interest of the program, and we are in the process of establishing a new target in 2019,” wrote William Gerstenmaier, chief of NASA’s human spaceflight program. “Caution should be used in referencing the report on the specific technical issues, but the overall conclusions are valid.”

The competition between the big government SLS/Orion program and private commercial space is downright embarrassing to the government. While SLS continues to be delayed, even after more than a decade of work and billions of wasted dollars, SpaceX is gearing up for the first flight of Falcon Heavy this year. And they will be doing it despite the fact that Congress took money from the commercial private space effort, delaying its progress, in order to throw more money at SLS/Orion.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Submission + - DNA-Based Test Can Spot Cancer Recurrence a Year Before Conventional Scans (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A revolutionary blood test has been shown to diagnose the recurrence of cancer up to a year in advance of conventional scans in a major lung cancer trial. The test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy crucial time for doctors by indicating that cancer is growing in the body when tumors are not yet detectable on CT scans and long before the patient becomes aware of physical symptoms. It works by detecting free-floating mutated DNA, released into the bloodstream by dying cancer cells. In the trial of 100 lung cancer patients, scientists saw precipitous rises in tumor DNA in the blood of patients who would go on to relapse months, or even a year, later. In the latest trial, reported in the journal Nature, 100 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were followed from diagnosis through surgery and chemotherapy, having blood tests every six to eight weeks. By analyzing the patchwork of genetic faults in cells across each tumor, scientists created personalized genomic templates for each patient. This was then compared to the DNA floating in their blood, to assess whether a fraction of it matched that seen in their tumor.

Submission + - Apple Is In Talks To Launch Its Own Venmo (recode.net)

An anonymous reader writes: The company has recently held discussions with payments industry partners about introducing its own Venmo competitor, according to multiple sources familiar with the talks. The service would allow iPhone owners to send money digitally to other iPhone owners, these people said. One source familiar with the plans told Recode they expect the company to announce the new service later this year. Another cautioned that an announcement and launch date may not yet be set. The new Apple product would compete with offerings from big U.S. banks as well as PayPal, its millennial-popular subsidiary Venmo, as well as Square Cash in the increasingly competitive world of digital money-transfers. Apple has also recently held discussions with Visa about creating its own pre-paid cards that would run on the Visa debit network and which would be tied to the new peer-to-peer service, sources told Recode. People would be able to use the Apple cards to spend money sent to them through the new service, without having to wait for it to clear to their bank account.

Submission + - SmartThings Has Access to Tens of Thousands of Private GitHub Repos (reddit.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After Samsung acquired SmartThings for a cool $200 million a few years ago, the company has been aggressively pushing for developers to enable GitHub access. At one time, the company boasted it had more than 20,000 developers on the platform. What most of those developers do not know is that the SmartThings integration is a blanket read on all repositories in your account. Why GitHub makes this an option, I have no idea. With all the turmoil over at Samsung lately, do you want that company to have access to all of your GitHub repositories? Have you checked what else has access to your repos lately?

Submission + - Google Loses Top Hardware Executive

randomErr writes: David Foster joined Alphabet Inc.'s Google in October as part of its aggressive hardware effort has left the company. As the vice president of hardware product development he worked on the launch of the Pixel smartphone and Home speaker. Both of which are competitors to the Amazon Echo, Foster's previous employer. Google will not comment on why he is leaving.

Submission + - Backdoor Could Allow Company To Shut Down 70% Of All Bitcoin Mining Operations (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An anonymous security researcher has published details on a vulnerability named "Antbleed," which the author claims is a remote backdoor affecting Bitcoin mining equipment sold by Bitmain, the largest vendor of crypto-currency mining hardware on the market. The backdoor code works by reporting mining equipment details to Bitmain servers, who can reply by instructing the customer's equipment to shut down.

Supposedly introduced as a crude DRM to control illegal equipment, the company forgot to tell anyone about it, and even ignored a user who reported it last fall. One of the Bitcoin Core developers claims that if such command would ever be sent, it could potentially brick the customer's device for good.

Bitmain is today's most popular seller of Bitcoin mining hardware, and its products account for 70% of the entire Bitcoin mining market. If someone hijack's the domain where this backdoor reports, he could be in the position to shut down Bitcoin mining operations all over the world, which are nothing more than the computations that verify Bitcoin transactions, effectively shutting down the entire Bitcoin ecosystem. Fortunately, there's a way to mitigate the backdoor's actions using local hosts files.

Submission + - Intel Puma6 modems highly vulnerable to DOS attack (dslreports.com)

Idisagree writes: It's being reported by users from the dslreports forum that the Puma6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low bandwidth DOS attack.

To add to this there are class actions lawsuits already going forward for performance issues with the Puma6. (https://www.classactionlawyers.com/puma6/)

It would appear the atom chip was never going to live up to the task it was designed for and these issues may have been known within Intel for quite some time.

Submission + - LinkedIn Testing 1970's-Style No-CS-Degree-Required Software Apprenticeships

theodp writes: The Mercury News reports on REACH, a new software apprenticeship program that LinkedIn’s engineering team started piloting this month, which offers people without Computer Science degrees an opportunity to get a foot in the door, as Microsoft-owned LinkedIn searches for ways to help diversify its workforce. For now, the 29 REACH participants are paid, but are only short-term LinkedIn employees (for the duration of the 6-month program). LinkedIn indicated it hopes to learn if tech internships could eventually be made part of the regular hiring process, perhaps unaware that no-CS-degree-required hiring for entry-level permanent positions in software development was standard practice in the 70's and 80's, back when women made up almost 40% of those working as programmers and in software-related fields, nearly double the percentage of women in LinkedIn's global 2016 tech workforce. Hey, even in tech hiring, everything old is new again!

Slashdot Top Deals