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Submission + - In the 21st century, we still have education systems for the 18th century. (theguardian.com)

golden_hands writes: The education system in most countries is still designed for a world that has ceased to exist- long term employment for someone else, industries which need people to make a profit are all vanishing over the horizon. We need an education system which will help children survive and thrive in the modern economy and teach them how to innovate, co-operate, collaborate and survive in today's age.

Submission + - Know, why is mounted in the charger or USB cables as the plastic cylinder? (latestlaptopnews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Today, many people use the laptop but do not focus on the small details. You will often notice that your laptop charger at the end of a thing is a too plastic-like cylinder.So now if you did not notice him. Blue cylinder like most people think it is something the company took lightly, but it is not. Putting things like this cylinder is the primary thrust of the company.

Submission + - New auto-destruct system to increase launch rate (spaceflightnow.com)

schwit1 writes: A new auto-destruct system operating by computer, using GPS, and installed on each rocket should allow the launch rate in Florida to ramp up significantly.

Up until now it took several days to reconfigure the ground-based radar facilities. This system, first used on the most recent Falcon 9 launch, does not require this. It also involves fewer people to operate it. They expect that they will soon be able to launch up to 48 missions per year, some on the same day.

Submission + - Specifications LG Gram - With 24 Hour Battery (techdach.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Today many people who love the light, not only smartphones but also with laptops. But when the laptop is made with a light weight, new issues arise the problem of durability of the laptop is only a few hours.

But not so with the latest laptops from LG. Laptops were named LG Gram has a lightweight size but has a larger battery and can even be used during the day and night or 24 hours.

The latest products from LG is expected to be introduced at CES 2017 which will be held today until January 7, 2017 in Las Vegas. LG said that they use carbon nanotube technology to create a 60Wh battery, almost double the battery capacity of previous versions of the 34,6Wh bigger than the Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch.

But laptops LG Gram has a thickness that is larger 0.61 inch to 13-inch models, is different when compared to the previous product which has a thickness of 0.5 inch to 14-inch models latpo.

But many doubt that this laptop can last for 24 hours when used to make a variety of activities or used for Internet access using Wi-Fi. Based on the new benchmark of (MobileMark 14), LG Gram is still able to survive for 17 hours to completely recharge.

Submission + - Google Goes Public with Unpatched Microsoft Edge and IE Vulnerability (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google has gone public with details of a second unpatched vulnerability in Microsoft products, this time in Edge and Internet Explorer, after last week they've published details about a bug in the Windows GDI (Graphics Device Interface) component. The bug, discovered by Google Project Zero researcher Ivan Fratric, is tracked by the CVE-2017-0037 identifier and is a type confusion, a kind of security flaw that can allow an attacker to execute code on the affected machine, and take over a device.

Details about CVE-2017-0037 are available in Google's bug report, along with proof-of-concept code. The PoC code causes a crash of the exploited browser, but depending on the attacker's skill level, more dangerous exploits could be built. Besides the Edge and IE bug, Microsoft products are also plagued by two other severe security flaws, one affecting the Windows GDI component and one the SMB file sharing protocol shipped with all Windows OS versions.

Microsoft canceled February's Patch Tuesday security updates, citing a "last minute issue." The company said last week it intended to ship the February Patch Tuesday updates during March's Patch Tuesday, scheduled for March 15.

Submission + - How to Get Back to the Moon in 4 Years--This Time to Stay (scientificamerican.com)

schwit1 writes: It’s a way to get to the Moon and to stay there permanently. A way to begin this process immediately and to achieve moon landings in less than four years.

How?

Turn to private industry. Turn to two companies in particular—Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Robert Bigelow’s Bigelow Aerospace. Why? Because the approach that NASA’s acting administrator Robert Lightfoot is pushing won’t allow a Moon landing.

Lightfoot’s problem lies in the two pieces of NASA equipment he wants to work with: a rocket that’s too expensive to fly and is years from completion—the Space Launch System; and a capsule that’s far from ready to carry humans—the Orion. Neither the SLS nor the Orion are able to land on the Moon. Let me repeat that. Once these pieces of super-expensive equipment reach the moon’s vicinity, they cannot land.

Who is able to land on the lunar surface? Elon Musk and Robert Bigelow. Musk’s rockets—the Falcon and the soon-to-be-launched Falcon Heavy—are built to take off and land. So far their landing capabilities have been used to ease them down on earth. But the same technology, with a few tweaks, gives them the ability to land payloads on the surface of the Moon. Including humans. What’s more, SpaceX’s upcoming seven-passenger Dragon 2 capsule has already demonstrated its ability to gentle itself down to earth’s surface. In other words, with a few modifications and equipment additions, Falcon rockets and Dragon capsules could be made Moon-ready.

There’s more. Within the space community, there is a wide disenchantment with “flags and footprints” missions. Flags and footprints missions are those like the Apollo landings in which astronauts land, plant a flag, hit a golf ball, then disappear for 45 years. Major segments of the space community want every future landing to add to a permanent infrastructure in the sky. And that’s within our grasp thanks to Robert Bigelow.

In 2000, Bigelow purchased a technology that Congress had ordered NASA to abandon: inflatable habitats. For the last sixteen years Bigelow and his company, Bigelow Aerospace, have been advancing inflatable habitat technology. Inflatable technology lets you squeeze a housing unit into a small package, carry it by rocket to a space destination, then blow it up like a balloon. Since the spring of 2016, Bigelow, a real estate developer and founder of the Budget Suites of America hotel chain, has had an inflatable habitat acting as a spare room at the International Space Station 220 miles above your head and mine. And Bigelow’s been developing something far more ambitious—an inflatable Moon Base, that would use three of his 330-cubic-meter B330 modules. What’s more, Bigelow has been developing a landing vehicle to bring his modules gently down to the Moon’s surface.

Then there’s a wild card—Jeff Bezos. Bezos’ Blue Origin rockets already have a well-tested capacity to take off, land, then take off again. Which means that in the next few years Bezos’ rockets, too, could land cargoes and passengers on the Moon.

Submission + - Is the Leading Theory About Alzheimer's Wrong? (theatlantic.com)

schwit1 writes: Last week, the pharmaceutical company Merck pulled the plug on a closely watched Alzheimer’s drug trial. The drug verubecestat, an outside committee concluded, had “virtually no chance” of benefit for patients with the disease.

The failure of one drug is of course disappointing, but verubecestat is only the latest in a string of failed trials all attempting the same strategy to battle Alzheimer’s. That pattern of failure has provoked some rather public soul-searching about the basic hypothesis that has guided Alzheimer’s research for the past quarter century.

Other skeptics of the amyloid hypothesis are coming back to tau, the protein Selkoe left decades ago to focus on amyloid. In the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, tau gets twisted into tangles that block the internal transport system of neurons. A recent failed trial aside, several drugs targeting tau are in early phases of clinical trials.

The waxing and waning of animating ideas is just how science works. For scientists, says Bart de Strooper, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the University of Leuven, these failed trials still have something to teach. “The failed trial doesn’t have to be a failure. We learn from it,” he says. “Only because a trial is done do we know now we have to go further.” The question is how much further. Refine the amyloid hypothesis, or abandon it altogether? Without the benefit of hindsight, it’s hard to know which is the side of history.

Submission + - Microsoft Bing Predicts says Denny Hamlin will win Daytona 500 today (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: âoeVroom. Vroom. You know what that sound is? Rubber hitting the pavement and NASCAR in all its glory. The DAYTONA 500 is on this weekend and Bing is a finely-tuned, heavy-horsepower search engine to help you stay in the race. Bing search results for NASCAR topics give you the lowdown on the teams, drivers, standings, schedule, latest news, and more for the first Sprint Cup Series,â says The Bing Team.

The team further says, âoeWho do you have taking the race? We feel pretty good about who Bing predicts. As NASCAR season progresses weâ(TM)re looking to bring NASCAR fans and newcomers the latest information and predictions for all the races so make checking in with Bing part of your NASCAR routine.â

Submission + - BlackBerry KeyOne Resurrects The QWERTY Keyboard Smartphone 1

Mickeycaskill writes: BlackBerry is back with its final smartphone, the QWERTY keyboard-toting, business-focussed BlackBerry KeyOne, previously codenamed Mercury.

Launched in the run-up to Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017 in Barcelona, the KeyOne was designed by BlackBerry but made by TCL Communications, which will take over the design and creation of future BlackBerry branded handsets.

Sporting a 4.5inch display with a resolution of 1620×1080, a Snapdragon 625 system-on-a-chip, a 3,505mAh battery, 12 megapixel rear camera and an eight megapixel one to the front, the KeyOne does not initially dazzle the smartphone market with its specifications.

But the standout feature is the phone’s QWERTY keyboard, something that both appealed and repulsed punters with the BlackBerry Priv, with the aim of making hacking out emails on the go far easier than the more haphazard process of tapping on a smartphone for some users.

Submission + - If your TV rats you out, what about your car? (autoblog.com)

schwit1 writes: Nowadays, auto manufacturers seem to be tripping over each other pointing out that they offer Apple CarPlay and Google Android Auto. And more recent phenomenon are announcements—from companies including Ford and Hyundai—that they are offering Amazon Alexa capabilities. You talk. It listens.

In late January, General Motors said it is releasing a next-generation infotainment software development kit (NGI SDK) to software developers to write apps for GM cars. The NGI SDK includes native Application Program Interfaces (APIs) that allow access to expected things — like oil life and tire pressure and whether lightbulbs are burned out — but unexpected things, as well. Like the presence of passengers in the vehicle.

Here's the thing. While it may seem appealing to have all manner of connectivity in cars, there is the other side of that. Without getting all tinfoil hat about this, when your TV set is ratting you out, isn't it likely that your car will?

It drives. And watches. And listens. And collects data the likes of which you might otherwise not have shared.

Submission + - Risk Of Cascadia Quake Elevated As Puget Sound 'Slow Slip' Event Begins (patch.com) 1

schwit1 writes: On Wednesday, the semi-annual "slow slip" event began, according to the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) at the University of Washington. The event happens about every 14 months deep underneath the Puget Sound area and is essentially a slow earthquake that takes place over the course of two weeks.

During a slow-slip event, after 14 months of moving eastward, the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate stalls and moves westward, which puts stress on the Cascadia subduction zone.

Seismologists often refer to this as a "straw that broke the camel's back" scenario.

"It's loading up the edge of the lock zone of the Cascadia subduction zone more rapidly than normal tectonic processes would do," explained Bill Steele, director of communications at the PNSN. "You're getting seven months of strain accumulation applied to the back edge of the fault over a week."

Submission + - First victim of SHA-1 collisions: Subversion. Technique was reverse engineered

Artem Tashkinov writes: A WebKit developer who tried to upload "bad" PDF files generated from the first successful SHA-1 attack broke WebKit's SVN repository because Subversion uses SHA-1 hash to differentiate commits. The reason to upload the files was to create a test for checking cache poisoning in WebKit.

Another news story is that based on the theoretical incomplete description of the SHA-1 collision attack published by Google just two days ago, people have managed to recreate the attack in practice and now you can download a python script which can create a new PDF file with the same SHA-1 hashsum using your input PDF. The attack is also implemented as a website which can prepare two PDF files with different JPEG images which will result in the same hash sum.

Submission + - Intel unofficially cuts prices for its x86 CPUs across the board 1

Artem Tashkinov writes: In an expected turn of events, now that AMD Ryzen is less than a week away from going public, Intel has unofficially cut prices for a long range of its CPUs. The biggest price cuts involve the following CPUs:
  • Intel Core i7-6850K, Broadwell, 3.6GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $700, now $550 (21% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6800K, Broadwell, 3.4GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $500, now $360 (28% off)
  • Intel Core i7-5820K, Haswell, 3.3GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $420, now $320 (24% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6700K, SkyLake, 4.0GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $400, now $260 (35% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6600K, SkyLake, 3.5GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $270, now $180 (33% off)

It's so good to finally have a competition in the x86 CPU market back after more than ten years since Intel released its Core 2 CPUs.

Submission + - MySQL Databases Targeted in New Ransom Attacks (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After the ransacking of MongoDB, ElasticSearch, Hadoop, CouchDB, and Cassandra servers, attackers are now hijacking hundreds of MySQL databases, deleting their content, and leaving a ransom note behind asking for a 0.2 Bitcoin ($235) payment. Attackers are gaining access to databases by brute-forcing root accounts for Internet-exposed MySQL servers.

The attacks started on February 12, and only lasted for 30 hours, during which time attackers breached hundreds of servers. Investigators said all attacks came from the same IP address from the Netherlands, 109.236.88.20, belonging to a hosting company called WorldStream.

In some cases attackers dumped the database, in other cases they deleted all content and left a ransom note behind. Two ransom notes have been found in the hundreds of confirmed attacks, one asking victims to get in contact via email and confirm the payment, while the other used a completely different mode of operation, redirecting users to a Tor-hosted website. At the time of writing, the Tor website is still up and running, at http://sognd75g4isasu2v.onion/

Submission + - Researchers develop new solid hydrogen storage system (llnl.gov) 1

An anonymous reader writes: US National Lab researchers at Lawerence Livermore, Sandia, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in collaboration with Mahidol University researchers, have successfully developed a new hydrogen storage system reliant on nanoscale sized Lithium Nitride materials (Li3N). Hydrogen power has been seen as a potentially valuable source of alternative, clean energy supplies but has faced difficulties due to its inherent safety issues in handling and storage.
The paper, “Nanointerface-driven reversible hydrogen storage in the nanoconfigured LI-N-H system,” published Thursday in the journal "Advanced Materials Interfaces," describes a new mechanism of hydrogen storage relying on the Li3N nanomaterials ability to store high quantities of solid hydrogen, without degradation and capable of recharging. Press release available in link, paper may be paywalled.

Submission + - White House blocks news organizations from press briefing (cnn.com)

ClickOnThis writes: CNN reports that it, along with several other major news organizations, were blocked from attending a press briefing at the White House today. From the article:

The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Politico and BuzzFeed were also excluded from the meeting, which is known as a gaggle and is less formal than the televised Q-and-A session in the White House briefing room. The gaggle was held by White House press secretary Sean Spicer.

In a brief statement defending the move, administration spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the White House "had the pool there so everyone would be represented and get an update from us today."

The pool usually includes a representative from one television network and one print outlet. In this case, four of the five major television networks — NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox News — were invited and attended the meeting, while only CNN was blocked.

And while The New York Times was kept out, conservative media organizations Breitbart News, The Washington Times and One America News Network were also allowed in.


Submission + - Toshiba plans to ship a 1TB flash chip to manufacturers this spring (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: Toshiba has begun shipping samples of its third-generation 3D NAND memory product, a chip with 64 stacked flash cells that it said will enable a 1TB chip it will ship this spring. The new flash memory product has 65% greater capacity than the previous generation technology, which used 48 layers of NAND flash cells. The chip will be used in data center and consumer SSD products. The technology announcement comes even as suitors are eyeing buying a majority share of the company's memory business. Along with a previous report about WD, Foxxcon, SK Hynix and Micron have now also thrown their hats in the ring to purchase a majority share in Toshiba's memory spin-off, according to a new report in the Nikkei's Asian Review.

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