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Submission + - The Tamagochi Singularity Made Real: Infinite Tamagochi Living on the Internet (

szczys writes: Everyone loves Tamagochi, little electronic keychains spawned in the 90's let you raise your digital pets. Some time ago, XKCD made a quip about an internet based matrix of thousands of these digital entities. That quip is now a reality thanks to elite hardware hacker Jeroen Domburg (aka Sprite_TM). In his recent talk called The Tamagochi Singularity at the Hackaday SuperConference he revealed that he had built an infinite network of virtual Tamagochi by implementing the original hardware as a virtual machine. This included developing AI to keep them happy, and developing a protocol to emulate their IR interactions. But he went even further, hacking an original keychain to use wirelessly as a console which can look in on any of the virtual Tamagochi living on his underground network. This full-stack process is unparalleled in just about every facet: complexity, speed of implementation, awesome factor, and will surely spark legions of other Tamagochi Matrices.

Submission + - Hillary Clinton campaign bullies comedians mocking her (

mi writes: A video of the short performance, which is less than three minutes, is posted on the website of the renowned club, Laugh Factory, and the Clinton campaign has tried to censor it. Besides demanding that the video be taken down, the Clinton campaign has demanded the personal contact information of the performers that appear in the recording. This is no laughing matter for club owner Jamie Masada, a comedy guru who opened Laugh Factory more than three decades ago and has been instrumental in launching the careers of many famous comics. “They threatened me,” Masada told Judicial Watch. “I have received complains before but never a call like this, threatening to put me out of business if I don’t cut the video.”

Submission + - 2016 Presidential Candidate Security Investigation (

Fryan writes: InfoSec Institute has assessed the security posture of 16 of the presidential candidates’ websites. This is an indicator of the level of security awareness the candidate and the campaign staff has.

The recent breaches and security lapses of high profile individuals highlight the absolute need for everyone to take security awareness seriously. The hacking of the Director of the CIA’s (John Brennan) personal email account, and the storage of classified emails on a personal email server with Hillary Clinton, show how damaging a lack of basic good security hygiene can be.

Submission + - New Stanford 'tricorder" detects early stage cancer (

Taffykay writes: Science fiction popularized the tri-corder concept, but Stanford scientists have turned the idea into a real-world device with groundbreaking applications. In addition to detecting explosives, Stanford's technology "hears" cancer tumors through ultrasound waves by emitting electromagnetic energy.

Submission + - New Algorithm Recognizes Both Good And Bad Fake Reviews (

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from the university of Sao Paolo have developed an algorithm able to identify both good and bad online reviews in the massive daily chatter of millions of peer-community posts, and in lateral mendacities at social network sites such as Google+ and Facebook reposts and 'likes'. Two of the datasets tested in the research were from Amazon, which has a vested interest in restoring the reputation of its community reviews, and has recently taken action on the matter.

Submission + - Ultrasound Prises Open Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Chemotherapy (

An anonymous reader writes: The blood-brain barrier is an almost impenetrable membrane that surrounds vessels in the brain and stops harmful particles from entering. The trouble is that it doesn't discriminate, at the same time making it very difficult for beneficial molecules like medication to pass through. But researchers have now non-invasively breached the barrierfor the first time in a human subject, delivering chemotherapy drugs to a brain cancer patient with a high level of precision and paving the way for improved treatments and fewer side effects for sufferers of neurological disorders.
Classic Games (Games)

How One Company Is Bringing Old Video Games Back From the Dead ( 106

harrymcc writes: Night Dive Studios is successfully reviving old video games — not the highest-profile best-sellers of the past, but cult classics such as System Shock 2, The 7th Guest, Strife, and I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream. It's a job that involves an enormous amount of detective work to track down rights holders as well as the expected technical challenges. Over at Fast Company, Jared Newman tells the story of how the company stumbled upon its thriving business. "Kick didn’t have money on hand to buy the rights, so he scraped together contract work with independent developers and funneled the proceeds into the project. ... Some efforts fall apart even without the involvement of media conglomerates. In early 2014, Kick tried to revive Dark Seed, a point-and-click adventure game that featured artwork by H.R. Giger. But after Giger’s sudden death, demands from the artist’s estate escalated, and the negotiations derailed. ... But for every one of those failures, there’s a case where a developer or publisher is thrilled to have a creation back on store shelves."

Comment Re:The general consensus amongst many Americans (Score 5, Interesting) 488

Well, we already did enjoy nice bottles of English wine. In the medieval warming period, vineyards were all over northern England. Today, many street names still have names of grape varieties as a result of those times.

Oh, crap. We can't talk about that. Nevermind.

Comment Re:Shorter list - what Google doesn't want to moni (Score 1) 105

>At least some of those people already had a history of mental health issues.

And the surprising thing is that it seems we can't keep guns out of their hands, either. I don't think anyone would stand up and argue for the rights of the mentally ill to carry firearms, but that has been the side effect of what we have actually practised.

Submission + - Innovative operating systems/distros in 2015? 2

iamacat writes: Back in 90s, we used Linux not only because of open source, but also for innovative features not found in commercial operating systems — better multitasking, network power features like slirp and masquerading, free developer tools for many languages. Nowadays OSX and Windows caught up in these areas and mainstream distros like Ubuntu dumbed down in default configuration. So where to go for active innovation like 3D/VR desktop, artificial intelligence, drag and drop ability to mash up UI of multiple apps or just drastically better performance? Something maybe rough around the edges but usable and exciting enough to use as daily desktop?

Comment The sanitay napkin (Score 1) 330

Prior to the development of the sanitary napkin, most women between the ages of approximately thirteen and somewhere in their fifties had to at least partially withdraw from society on a monthly basis. Now the participation limits on women are societal norms and part of pregnancy / infancy. I suspect the societal norms are the more restrictive of the two.

Comment Re:Gravity ... (Score 2) 242

Mars Landing Hoax.

Watney is playing all that in a soundstage somewhere in Nevada. That's why gravity is all wrong. It's all a plot to increase NASA funding and to stick it to the Russkies. ...

I'm sorry, that was the plot to Capricorn One. Carry on.

Comment Re:As opposed to... (Score 1) 215

I could see a lossy algorithm for HTML / JS that eliminates lengthy tags and inefficient structures, perhaps even perform code optimization on heavily JS-infested pages, while rendering identically to the original.
The result of course would look nothing like the source and couldn't easily be reconstructed.

6 Curses = 1 Hexahex