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Comment: Re:Who actually believes this stuff? (Score 1) 1059

by Yaztromo (#49616141) Attached to: Two Gunman Killed Outside "Draw the Prophet" Event In Texas

If you set up an event specifically designed to insult/offend/antagonise a particular religion, you're always going to get a response like this from someone.

Please stop spouting nonsense...

Yeah, like those times when the Orange Order held their parades in Northern Ireland, celebrating victory in a battle over 300 years ago, where everyone had cake and ice cream went home with balloons.

No, wait, that's not right -- according to this for over 100 years people have been killed, seriously injured, homes and cars have been set ablaze, and bombs have been thrown around like footballs. In 1998, three brothers between the ages of 8 and 10 were murdered when their house burned to the ground from a thrown firebomb.

That was between two Christian groups and was over a parade.

Yaz

Comment: Re:Looks like the prophet's gunmen (Score 1) 1059

by Yaztromo (#49615621) Attached to: Two Gunman Killed Outside "Draw the Prophet" Event In Texas

When Christians show up with guns blazing, or hiding suicide bombs, or anything like that, then you might have something.

What, like The Troubles (aka The Northern Ireland Conflict)?

Let's see -- sectarian violence between two Christian groups (Catholics and Protestants) who were divided on purely religious grounds, that lasted for at least 30 years, with over 3500 confirmed dead and over 47 000 wounded. Where in one year alone, there were over 1300 bombings (including suitcase bombs and car bombs in populated areas).

And while it somewhat "officially" ended in 1998, there have been over 100 deaths since that time.

So let's tally it up somewhat -- Christians showing up with guns blazing? Check. Christians hiding bombs? Check. Looks like I have something!

Either you're 12 years old and don't remember how Christian-on-Christian sectarian violence in Northern Ireland was a near daily news item, you're being deliberately obtuse, or you're a complete moron. I'll leave you to decide which one.

Yaz

Comment: Re:Predictable (Score 4, Informative) 176

He doesn't seem overweight for me.

While I feel for the family, to say that he is not overweight shows just how much society's perception of being overweight has changed.

Take a look at this picture, for instance.

And take a look at the body fat visual chart for comparison.

With the overhanging belly, he is easily 35-40% at least. While the majority of people today are fat (especially in the US), that is not healthy. If anything, until recently, 20-25% used to be average.

Above 25-30% is the fat territory, and that's when you start increasing your risk for heart attacks, diabetes, and strokes. Mr. Goldberg may have had a lot of things going for him, but he is most certainly more than a little overweight.

Assuming he's ~6 feet, I would argue that he is probably ~30-40+ lbs overweight. That is not at all healthy. I'm not arguing everyone should have abs, but there's a happy medium here. Mr. Goldberg is very clearly on the unfortunate side of the medium.

Comment: Re:She has a point. (Score 1) 611

by dreamchaser (#49602233) Attached to: My High School CS Homework Is the Centerfold

Right. Because helping further the Victorian Era sexual repression that's ingrained in our culture is a good thing. Hint: it's not. No, we don't need to go overboard with it. That being said, not so long ago 14 year olds were getting married and having children. Get over your sexual repression and just grow the fuck up.

+ - The Pioneer Who Invented the Weather Forecast

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: Peter Moore has a fascinating article on BBC about how Admiral Robert FitzRoy, the man who invented the weather forecast in the 1860s faced skepticism and even mockery in his time but whose vision of a public forecasting service, funded by government for the benefit of all, is fundamental to our way of life. Chiefly remembered today as Charles Darwin's taciturn captain on HMS Beagle, during the famous circumnavigation in the 1830s, in his lifetime FitzRoy found celebrity from his pioneering daily weather predictions, which he called by a new name of his own invention — "forecasts". There was no such thing as a weather forecast in 1854 when FitzRoy established what would later be called the Met Office. With no forecasts, fishermen, farmers and others who worked in the open had to rely on weather wisdom — the appearance of clouds or the behavior of animals — to tell them what was coming as the belief persisted among many that weather was completely chaotic. But FitzRoy was troubled by the massive loss of life at sea around the coasts of Victorian Britain where from 1855 to 1860, 7,402 ships were wrecked off the coasts with a total of 7,201 lost lives. With the telegraph network expanding quickly, FitzRoy was able to start gathering real-time weather data from the coasts at his London office. If he thought a storm was imminent, he could telegraph a port where a drum was raised in the harbor. It was, he said, "a race to warn the outpost before the gale reaches them".

For FitzRoy the forecasts were a by-product of his storm warnings. As he was analyzing atmospheric data anyway, he reasoned that he might as well forward his conclusions — fine, fair, rainy or stormy — on to the newspapers for publication. "Prophecies and predictions they are not," he wrote, "the term forecast is strictly applicable to such an opinion as is the result of scientific combination and calculation." The forecasts soon became a quirk of this brave new Victorian society. FitzRoy's forecasts had a particular appeal for the horseracing classes who used the predictions to help them pick their outfits or lay their bets.

But FitzRoy soon faced serious difficulties. Some politicians complained about the cost of the telegraphing back and forth. The response to FitzRoy's work was the beginning of an attitude that we reserve for our weather forecasters today. The papers enjoyed nothing more than conflating the role of the forecaster with that of God and the scientific community were skeptical of his methods. While the majority of fishermen were supportive, others begrudged a day's lost catch to a mistaken signal. FitzRoy retired from his west London home to Norwood, south of the capital, for a period of rest but he struggled to recover and on 30 April 1865 FitzRoy cut his throat at his residence, Lyndhurst-house, Norwood, on Sunday morning. "In time, the revolutionary nature of FitzRoy's work would be recognised," says Moore. "FitzRoy's vision of a weather-prediction service funded by government for the benefit of its citizens would not die. In 1871, the United States would start issuing its own weather "probabilities", and by the end of the decade what was now being called the Met Office would resume its own forecasts in Britain."

+ - 40-50% jobs to be automated: PWC, CoPS@Vic Uni & Oxford Uni: big economics->

Submitted by Matt Hurd
Matt Hurd writes: 44% of Australian jobs at risk. 47% of US jobs at risk.

Report says doctors, teachers and nurses least at risk. Accountants, cashiers and admin workers most at risk.
Strangely, DBAs reported not at risk. Let's hope they're wrong. Thankfully, real estate sales are at risk.

It's a new economic revolution similar in scale to the industrial revolution. It is happening now thanks to all those nice computer folk allowing computers to make sense out of senses after failing for the previous sixty or seventy years. The Age of Perception, if you like.

Link to Original Source
Stats

Humans Dominating Poker Super Computer 88

Posted by timothy
from the maybe-it's-a-ringer dept.
New submitter IoTdude writes: The Claudico super computer uses an algorithm to account for gargantuan amounts of complexity by representing the number of possible Heads-Up No-limit Texas Hold'em decisions. Claudico also updates its strategy as it goes along, but its basic approach to the game involves getting into every hand by calling bets. And it's not working out so far. Halfway through the competition, the four human pros had a cumulative lead of 626,892 chips. Though much could change in the week remaining, a lead of around 600,000 chips is considered statistically significant.
User Journal

Journal: The new podcast

Journal by DisownedSky

I'm trying to not let this turn into an obsession, or to dstract from my work on the Wow! Signal, but so far it kind of is. The new podcast is the Unseen Podcast, and it is an uneditted, uncensored, open participation approach. Each episode features a panel, with the panelists drawn from a pool of people who just raise their hands by joining a G+ community. So far, we've done 4 episodes with 5 unique panelists, hoping to hit 30 panelists by Episode 26.

Comment: Re:This sucks for Seattle! (Score 1) 86

Comcast previously promised the city they would provide service for their entire monopoly area if this went through...

Telecom companies are famous for *making* promises.

Making good on them, not so much.

They'd have probably gotten around to your area about the same time as your first Social Security check.

Comment: Re:Well... (Score 1) 86

Wheeler, 69, does not need to seek another job when he departs the FCC, and that freedom enables him to make the decisions he thinks is right, according to people close to the chairman.

Judging simply from his age, it's very implausible that his actions were part of a ploy to seek secure employment after the FCC.

He won't be too old to sit on some corporate Boards of Directors.

"A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." -- William James

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