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Comment: Re:Actually, he's right (Score 1) 437

by bmo (#48678183) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

"so where do we get the next generation of major league players from?"

Brown & Sharpe (now a tiny little division of Hexagon AB) used to be the preeminent machine tool manufacturer in the US.

One of my previous bosses was told by one of the Sharpes that the day the company died was the day they stopped training apprentices.

Short-term-profits-at-any-cost amounts to eating your seed corn and then sowing the ground with salt.

--
BMO

Comment: Re:TFA is a big bullshit ! (Score 2) 32

by LynnwoodRooster (#48672741) Attached to: Inside China's 'Christmas Factory' Town, Yiwu
Note that $500 is about 300 pounds - right in line with the story. And smaller cities in Zhejiang typically are 20-30% less than the Shanghai area. I know in Suzhou my factories tend to pay around 2500 RMB for a 1-2 year experienced worker, with performance bonuses adding up to 1000 RMB on top of that.

Comment: Re:TFA is a big bullshit ! (Score 3, Informative) 32

by LynnwoodRooster (#48672733) Attached to: Inside China's 'Christmas Factory' Town, Yiwu

I am from China, although I am an American now, I do run businesses and some of them are in China

When I read the " ... for a maximum of £200 to £300 a month" I know that TFA is a big bullshit !

Really? I think you don't know China, nor do you do any business there. Zhejiang has the highest minimum wage, and it peaks in Ningbo at 1550 RMB per month (this information is out of date a bit, but pretty close to current conditions). That's 160 pounds sterling. Given that only inexperienced/brand new workers will earn minimum wage, the range of 200 to 300 pounds sterling is completely understandable and expected (that's about 2000 to 3000 RMB per month).

Additionally, new sales staff/office trainees in places like Shanghai run about 3500 RMB per month (low-level white collar) and a fresh acoustical engineering grad from the University of Nanjing (top Chinese school) in the top 10% of his class earns 4500 RMB (about 450 pounds sterling) per month. A very experienced (8 year) office manager with excellent English skills and 5 years experience working for Western companies earns 8000 RMB per month. How do I know? I just returned 4 days ago from Shanghai, where I signed contracts for all those positions.

Factory workers in China in the East rarely start at more than minimum wage. 1500 to 2000 RMB is a very good starting wage, and line bosses/leads may earn double that amount. Well below your 5000 RMB per month minimum salary.

Comment: I think you've pinpointed a massive flaw here (Score 1) 347

by UpnAtom (#48665551) Attached to: Ars: Final Hobbit Movie Is 'Soulless End' To 'Flawed' Trilogy

I was hoping that the trilogy could be rescued by a fan-edit. But now I don't.

The Hobbit is completely devoid of suspense (haven't seen Part 3 and will wait for DVD). Compare with FotR:

Opening story with Sauron kicking ass.
The early scene where Frodo and the hobbits nearly get discovered by a Dark Rider. Probably the best scene of the trilogy, with visually-distorting magic and insects freaking out if you weren't convinced yet.
Weathertop, not one of the better scenes but still great.
Arwen rescuing Frodo. First deviation from book but probably made it a better film (unlike deviations in later 2 films).
Moria scenes: just amazing.

To be frank, FotR was vastly better than the subsequent two, which relied on large battles for thrills. I'm going to guess that Jackson had some help with FotR... and thank God. It's become one of the best films of all time.

Now the Hobbit had nothing like that, maybe because of child audience potential but also because of the other big flaw: none of the dwarves are convincing bar possibly Thorin. They don't look right and don't act great either.

Maybe keep the sections focussing on Bilbo, Gandalf, Radagast, Smaug, bits of Thorin and turn it into an hour long prelude to LotR. Yep, cut 80-90% of it.

Comment: Re:What do you expect from STANford (Score 1) 217

by LynnwoodRooster (#48665407) Attached to: Tech's Gender Gap Started At Stanford

Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Kurdistan, Istanbul...

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

Every gal in Constantinople
Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
So if you've a date in Constantinople
She'll be waiting in Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul, Istanbul
Istanbul, Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul

Best version - Craig Ferguson!

Comment: Re:Under an NIH grant? (Score 0) 33

by rs79 (#48661525) Attached to: Meet the Doctor Trying To Use the Blood of Ebola Survivors To Create a Cure

It was discovered in 95 by an African doctor who just guessed and saved 7 out of 8 people;

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/...

something wasn't right about this though.

http://jvi.asm.org/content/75/...

the who was skeptical and it's only been in the last few months when it's been approved, when it was used out of desperation that the protocol has gained any traction. there are billions at stake with an EBOV vaccine, just as there was in 1948 with the polio vaccine.

"Klenner's paper (Klenner FR. The treatment of poliomyelitis and other virus diseases with vitamin C. J. South. Med. and Surg., 111:210-214, 1949.) on curing 60 cases of polio in the epidemic of 1948 should have changed the way infectious diseases were treated but it did not." - Robert Cathcart

Now look at these three:

http://en.ird.fr/the-media-cen...
http://orthomolecular.org/libr...
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/cont...

There's a reason there's no HIV vaccine and it's the same reason there never will nor can be an EBOV vaccine - Coxsackie viruses are different and if you ignore their RNA encoding and subsequent biochemical expression you're gonna have a really bad day. The second paper above explains why they cannot work, see Keshen's disease in Wikipedia, it's the Coxsackie virus disease we figured this out from.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K...

There's no need to mess around with blood, honest and antibodies are not the reason it works - what do antibodies need to do their job - think!. Look at recent work in the field, Google (scholar) "selenium" with words like "hiv", "ebola", "cancer" and pay attention to the work of the last 4-5 years and especially THAT 1995 Zaire paper - the only time Pauling ever posted to the net. Thanks for the warning Linus, you clever clever boy. Now there was a Doctor.

http://scarc.library.oregonsta...

Comment: Another SanDiegoFire memory (Score 1) 36

by calidoscope (#48660707) Attached to: How a Wildfire Helped Spread the Hashtag
One of the most useful instances of social media and Googles apps was a series of postings on a San Diego Union Tribune discussion board related to the fires. The poster was embedding links to a Google Maps page with frequently updated fire perimeter along with reports of where the evacuation centers were being set up. It was very useful as my family and I were about an hour from needing to evacuate when the winds shifted.

Comment: Cartooney. (Score 3, Informative) 161

by bmo (#48659349) Attached to: 'Citizenfour' Producers Sued Over Edward Snowden Leaks

Yet another self-obsessed legal "expurt" suing over a ham sandwich"

Horace Edwards, who identifies himself as a retired naval officer and the former secretary of the Kansas Department of Transportation, has filed a lawsuit in Kansas federal court that seeks a constructive trust over monies derived from the distribution of Citizenfour. .

Court: Does he have standing
Court looks
He hasn't been damaged, You must have some sort of injury, financial or physical, or whatever, to have any standing in a tort.
Court: Come back when you have standing, now go away and stop wasting our time.

The only "person" who can bring an action that has any weight behind it is the US Government, or some other person who has been directly harmed. That would be under the purview of the Justice Department or one of the armed services or someone who has suffered some loss that must be made whole.

Granted that I have a "GED in Law," but that's my best bet as to what's going to happen.

--
BMO

Movies

'Citizenfour' Producers Sued Over Edward Snowden Leaks 161

Posted by Soulskill
from the indicting-a-ham-sandwich dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this news from The Hollywood Reporter: Horace Edwards, who identifies himself as a retired naval officer and the former secretary of the Kansas Department of Transportation, has filed a lawsuit in Kansas federal court that seeks a constructive trust over monies derived from the distribution of Citizenfour. Edwards ... seeks to hold Snowden, director Laura Poitras, The Weinstein Co., Participant Media and others responsible for "obligations owed to the American people" and "misuse purloined information disclosed to foreign enemies." It's an unusual lawsuit, one that the plaintiff likens to "a derivative action on behalf of the American Public," and is primarily based upon Snowden's agreement with the United States to keep confidentiality. ... Edwards appears to be making the argument that Snowden's security clearance creates a fiduciary duty of loyalty — one that was allegedly breached by Snowden's participation in the production of Citizenfour without allowing prepublication clearance review. As for the producers and distributors, they are said to be "aiding and abetting the theft and misuse of stolen government documents." The lawsuit seeks a constructive trust to redress the alleged unjust enrichment by the film. A 1980 case that involved a former CIA officer's book went up to the Supreme Court and might have opened the path to such a remedy.

Comment: Re:and they make big bonfires, too (Score 2) 248

by LynnwoodRooster (#48653363) Attached to: The Magic of Pallets

Not always. Going to a 1018 grade steel (0.18%) essentially renders the steel non-magnetic (you lose about 97% of the permeability of decent magnetic steel). Not stainless (still low enough carbon to rust easily), but very weak in terms of magnetism. I design and build audio transducers for a living, and work with various grades of magnetic (and non-magnetic) steel daily. Getting much above 0.15% carbon content or annealing the steel, and you lose a lot of the magnetic properties (permeability goes to pot) that allow for easy harvesting.

Using a magnet to sift out your nails is not a surefire approach to keeping them off of beaches.

Crime

GCHQ Warns It Is Losing Track of Serious Criminals 225

Posted by samzenpus
from the where-are-they-now dept.
An anonymous reader writes The Telegraph reports, "GCHQ has lost track of some of the most dangerous crime lords and has had to abort surveillance on others after Edward Snowden revealed their tactics ... The spy agency has suffered "significant" damage in its ability to monitor and capture serious organized criminals following the exposes by the former CIA contractor. Intelligence officers are now blind to more than a quarter of the activities of the UK's most harmful crime gangs after they changed their communications methods in the wake of the Snowden leaks. One major drug smuggling gang has been able to continue flooding the UK with Class A narcotics unimpeded for the last year after changing their operations. More intense tracking of others has either been abandoned or not started because of fears the tactics are now too easy to spot and will force the criminals to "go dark" and be lost sight of completely."

Comment: Assumptions (Score 1) 419

by bmo (#48648547) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Up To the Job?

So, assuming Microsoft is sincere

That's a pretty fuckin' big assumption there, guy.

>BMO goes back to read the Halloween documents

The Easter Bunny, Santa Claus, A Sincere Microsoft Board Member, and a Rabbi (a Rabbi is required in every joke) come to a 4-way stop/intersection at the same time.

Who goes first?

The Rabbi, because the others don't fuckin' exist.

--
BMO

Sigmund Freud is alleged to have said that in the last analysis the entire field of psychology may reduce to biological electrochemistry.

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