Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Leave then (Score 1) 876

by Sique (#49340603) Attached to: Gen Con Threatens To Leave Indianapolis Over Religious Freedom Bill
The tradition in my country is that a marriage is whatever the public servant according to the current law performs as marriage.

Churches and other religious affiliations are not allowed to perform marriages in general. They can perform a church wedding afterwards, but that's a private decision of the couple and has nothing to do with the legal marriage.

Comment: Re:It works both ways (Score 4, Insightful) 876

by Sique (#49340497) Attached to: Gen Con Threatens To Leave Indianapolis Over Religious Freedom Bill
If your business is "open to the public", then you have to serve the public. Period. It's a matter of contract. You as a business make an offer to the public to serve them, and if someone accepts that offer, the contract is finalised. You can't reopen the negotiations afterwards by claiming that you don't like the person for whatever reason. That would be culpa in contrahendo.

If you don't want to serve some groups of people for whatever reasons, you aren't open to the public. And then you have to say that first, e.g. by calling you a club or a closed society.

Comment: Re:$1,000 / visitor (Score 1) 876

by Sique (#49340403) Attached to: Gen Con Threatens To Leave Indianapolis Over Religious Freedom Bill
Of course they have a phobia -- an irrational fear that that person will have some unwanted influence upon them.

Otherwise why would they care about the sexual orientation of someone else? As long as they don't actively look for a mating partner, the sexual orientation of everyone else is none of their business, the same that it's none of their business what type of wallpaper that person has in his bedroom.

Comment: Re:Buggy Whip (Score 2) 119

by Sique (#49334555) Attached to: GNU Nano Gets New Stable Release
When your GUI doesn't come up correctly, what do you do? In Windows, it's reinstalling the whole OS, taking about one workday until most of the important patches are also installed, not withstanding reinstalling a lot of software. In UNIX, it's a few minutes of editing the config files, and then restarting the GUI. But how do you edit the config files? Be glad someone made a buggy whip!

I know the buggy whip maker is some nice metaphor, but some people don't think it through.

Comment: Re:goddamnit!!! (Score 1) 122

by Sique (#49334317) Attached to: Hack Air-Gapped Computers Using Heat
Most security systems have several layers of defense. To assess how much a break of one line influences the other lines you have to know what new attack vectors are open.

Lets say you have two systems A and B. System A has very important data, and it is important not only that the data is protected from access, it is also important that if it is accessed unauthorizedly, to know at least, if any data was sent to the outside. System B is less important and in a DMZ. If system B is compromised, you just power it off and reinstall it from a known good backup, but normally you don't do a thorough forensic analysis, you might not even have the right monitoring in place as there is no important data on system B (maybe it's just a web server serving static content like pictures for your corporate website, data that is known to the world anyway).

With this attack you can tunnel data from System A to the outside without the attacked being aware. Even if the victim does a thorough analysis of system A and all paths from and to system A known to the victim, it will be not aware of the actual data leak.

Comment: Re:So lemme get this right: (Score 4, Informative) 45

by Sique (#49319851) Attached to: Cisco SPA300/500 IP Phones Vulnerable To Remote Eavesdropping
Normally, your phone is not reachable by the public network, the attacker has to be within the LAN to sent an XML packet to your phone. And if you have a SIP phone reachable from the outside, it still sits behind a Session Border Controller, which only forwards SIP, but not XML.

So yes, the severity is low, as the attacker has to be within your LAN in almost all scenarios.

Comment: Re:Sigh (Score 1) 200

by Sique (#49299541) Attached to: NZ Customs Wants Power To Require Passwords

The problem I have with laws like this is that you ONLY catch the stupid people anyway.

Always remember: They have to succeed only once. Yes, a smart criminal might get away again and again -- until he doesn't get away any longer because of some stupid mistake. Outside of our special talents, knowledge and education, all of us are stupid.

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Sique (#49289931) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future
Irrelevant. The moment they aren't banned in other countries and getting to be the norm there because of decreasing accidents, less traffic jams, better utilization of roads and lower impact on the environment, some will rethink their stance and reintroduce them again. It might be a 10 years delay, but I think self driving cars will be the norm.

I for instance would buy one as soon as they are affordable.

Comment: Re:My experience with bilingual people (Score 1) 274

by Sique (#49284547) Attached to: Speaking a Second Language May Change How You See the World
The Thirty Years War is in fact a series of several wars fought in parallel or in succession. But it started out as an inner German civil war, and until 1631 it mainly was. Bohemia was multilingual, true, but it was a domain of the Habsburgs, which in turn were Germans. The mainly protestant Bohemians seceded from Habsburg and choose Frederick V, Elector Palatine in 1618 as their new king, who was German too, which started the war (and caused Frederick V to be called "winter king", because his reign endet in the Spring of 1619). Then Germany was split into two alliances, the League (the Habsburgian Emperor and mainly catholic German countries) and the Union (the protestant German countries with the exception of Saxony).

The League tried to conquer the Union states with two armies, the Bavarian army led by Gen. Tilly, and the Imperial army lead by Gen. Wallenstein (Waldstejn), who was Bohemian despite his German name. They devastated most German protestant countries till 1631, when the King of Sweden entered the battle to "save Protestantism".

When France entered the battle, it was trying to oust the Habsburgs from Spain or at least to weaken the Habsburg influence in Europe.

"Life sucks, but it's better than the alternative." -- Peter da Silva

Working...