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Comment: ANTIOXIDANTS! (Score 1) 33 33

Consuming 40 pounds of blueberries a day will stop the aging process!

I can see lifestyle and genetics being the main drivers. Look at 3rd world citizens, some look like they are 50 when they are in their late 20's. High stress life, lack of proper nutrition, etc...

But then you have the genetics curveball. There is a guy here at work that is 70 years old and he looks like he is not a day over 40.

Medicine

Scientists Show Human Aging Rates Vary Widely 33 33

HughPickens.com writes: Ever notice at your high school reunions how some classmates look ten years older than everybody else — and some look ten years younger. Now BBC reports that a study of people born within a year of each other has uncovered a huge gulf in the speed at which human bodies bodies age. The report tracked traits such as weight, kidney function and gum health and found that some of the 38-year-olds in the study were aging so badly that their "biological age" was on the cusp of retirement. "They look rough, they look lacking in vitality," says Prof Terrie Moffitt. The study says some people had almost stopped aging during the period of the study, while others were gaining nearly three years of biological age for every twelve months that passed. "Any area of life where we currently use chronological age is faulty, if we knew more about biological age we could be more fair and egalitarian," says Moffitt. The researchers studied aging in 954 young humans, the Dunedin Study birth cohort, tracking multiple biomarkers across three time points spanning their third and fourth decades of life. They developed and validated two methods by which aging can be measured in young adults, one cross-sectional and one longitudinal. According to Moffit the science of healthspan extension may be focused on the wrong end of the lifespan; rather than only studying old humans, geroscience should also study the young. "Eventually if we really want to slow the process of ageing to prevent the onset of disease we're going to have to intervene with young people."

+ - Scientists Show Human Aging Rates Vary Widely

HughPickens.com writes: Ever notice at your high school reunions how some classmates look ten years older than everybody else — and some look ten years younger. Now BBC reports that a study of people born within a year of each other has uncovered a huge gulf in the speed at which human bodies bodies age. The report tracked traits such as weight, kidney function and gum health and found that some of the 38-year-olds in the study were aging so badly that their "biological age" was on the cusp of retirement. "They look rough, they look lacking in vitality," says Prof Terrie Moffitt. The study says some people had almost stopped aging during the period of the study, while others were gaining nearly three years of biological age for every twelve months that passed. "Any area of life where we currently use chronological age is faulty, if we knew more about biological age we could be more fair and egalitarian," says Moffitt. The researchers studied aging in 954 young humans, the Dunedin Study birth cohort, tracking multiple biomarkers across three time points spanning their third and fourth decades of life. They developed and validated two methods by which aging can be measured in young adults, one cross-sectional and one longitudinal. According to Moffit the science of healthspan extension may be focused on the wrong end of the lifespan; rather than only studying old humans, geroscience should also study the young. "Eventually if we really want to slow the process of ageing to prevent the onset of disease we're going to have to intervene with young people."

+ - BBC unveils finished micro:bit set for free, open launch this October->

An anonymous reader writes: The BBC has announced the final design of its educational micro:bit microcontroller, a pocket-sized codeable computer which the broadcasting giant will release under an open source licence in late 2015. The Micro Bit was first announced in March and marks the BBC’s most ambitious step into technology education for 30 years since the BBC Micro, launched in partnership with Acorn Computers. The micro:bit will offer a range of coding content, lesson plans, and media resources aimed at teaching and encouraging school children to program. Since it was first announced the design of the micro:bit’s board has changed considerably. The device now features three crocodile clip-friendly GPIO connectors and power rails on one side. The final version also includes two button located on top of the board, a 5x5 surface-mount LED grid, an accelerometer, a magnetometer, Bluetooth chips on the underside, and an ARM mbed microprocessor. Micro:bits will be offered free of charge to every child aged between 11 and 12 across the UK from October. A commercial launch is expected to follow, but dates and price details are yet been confirmed. The BBC also said that it was committed to sharing the complete technical specifications for the micro:bit with an open source licence. The initiative will be backed by a not-for-profit partnership between the BBC and companies including ARM, Samsung and Microsoft.
Link to Original Source

+ - The Sadistic Economics of Comic-Con's Exclusive Toys->

ssprosvcs writes: Cool toys produced in ludicrously meager quantities—it must be Comic-Con season. As fans gear up to make their annual San Diego pilgrimage, scheduled this year from July 9-12, retailers prepare to sweeten the deal with items you can only get if you arrive early and stand in line for hours at the appropriate booth
What’s the point of Comic-Con’s sadistic economy? Chalk it up to supply and demand. John Frascotti, chief marketing officer with Hasbro, told CNN that exclusives cater to core fans and serve to increase hype at the booth during the event.
"It ties right into what collectors at Comic-Con are looking for, which is something unique, something special, something that no one else has,” he said.
In previous years, Comic-Con exclusives have been an opportunity for companies to cater to fans with products that might be obscure to some, but instantly recognizable to their core audiences. For example, in 2013, Hasbro released a glittery exclusive of Vinyl Scratch, a side character with a niche fanbase.

Link to Original Source

+ - High-Performance Supercapacitors from Niobium Nanowire Yarns for Wearables.

rtoz writes: Wearable electronic devices for health and fitness monitoring are a rapidly growing area of consumer electronics; one of their biggest limitations is the capacity of their tiny batteries to deliver enough power to transmit data. Now, researchers at MIT have found a promising new approach to delivering the short but intense bursts of power needed by such small devices.

The key is a new approach to making supercapacitors — devices that can store and release electrical power in such bursts, which are needed for brief transmissions of data from wearable devices such as heart-rate monitors, computers, or smartphones. They may also be useful for other applications where high power is needed in small volumes, such as autonomous microrobots.

The new approach uses yarns, made from nanowires of the element niobium, as the electrodes in tiny supercapacitors

Nanotechnology researchers have been working to increase the performance of supercapacitors for the past decade. Among nanomaterials, carbon-based nanoparticles — such as carbon nanotubes and graphene — have shown promising results, but they suffer from relatively low electrical conductivity

In this new work, the researchers have shown that desirable characteristics for such devices, such as high power density, are not unique to carbon-based nanoparticles, and that niobium nanowire yarn is a promising alternative.

The new nanowire-based supercapacitor exceeds the performance of existing batteries, while occupying a very small volume.

The innovation is especially significant for small devices, as this technology can deliver big bursts of power from a very small device.

Niobium is a fairly abundant and widely used material. so the whole system should be inexpensive and easy to produce

The niobium-based supercapacitors can store up to five times as much power in a given volume as carbon nanotube versions.

Niobium also has a very high melting point — nearly 2,500 degrees Celsius — so devices made from these nanowires could potentially be suitable for use in high-temperature applications.

In addition, the material is highly flexible, so this innovation is very significant in the development of smart fabrics and future wearable technologies

Comment: Re:trick them into it ... (Score 1, Troll) 123 123

People dont understand that.

It's why I am fending off job offers monthly. I have a skillset that is in very high demand and I am in a field that has never had a lot of people in it.

So when I get a job offer and change jobs, I can dictate my pay, compensation and work conditions. I dont start a new job with the peons and starter vacation, I start at max vacation, the desk type I want, the equipment I want, and the amount of office space and window.

This is what happens when you work hard at being someone that is very very good at the job and in a very in demand field.

Businesses

Ask Slashdot: How Do You Find Jobs That Offer Working From Home? 123 123

jez9999 writes: I'm a software developer in the UK, and I've found that it's very rare (maybe 5% of the time) to find an employer that will even consider any working from home, let alone for the majority of the time. I see it as a win-win; you're able to work in the home environment you are most productive in, and you can use the time you would've been commuting to work a bit longer for the employer. Not only that, but you're not adding to road congestion either. Skype, etc. make communication with coworkers a snap these days. So how do you go about finding homeworking jobs? Is it better to demand it from the get-go, or wait a few months and then ask for it? Is it more common than 5% of jobs in the US (in which case I guess it's a cultural thing the UK needs to catch up with)?

+ - 2,200 year-old town uses Twitter to run the entire city-> 1 1

dkatana writes: Jun's administration is using Twitter to reduce bureaucracy, serve its citizens, and run a more efficient administration.

Former Twitter's CEO Dick Costelo visited the town of Jun [pronounced "hoon"] in Granada last April to see first hand how the city administration could run all basic services using the platform.

According to mayor José Antonio Rodríguez Salas (@JoseantonioJun) all city's paperwork is done on Twitter.

All public employees have a Twitter account, including the town’s police officer (@PoliciaJun), the town electrician, and the street sweeper (@BarredoraJun). Mayor Rodríguez Salas, who has been in the town’s government since 1991 and became mayor in 2005, personally answers his account, which has over 350,000 followers, more than the mayors of Madrid, New York and Barcelona.

Link to Original Source

+ - Eric Holder Says Justice Department Could Strike Deal With Edward Snowden->

cold fjord writes: Yahoo reports, "Former Attorney General Eric Holder said today that a “possibility exists” for the Justice Department to cut a deal with ... Edward Snowden that would allow him to return to the United States ... Holder said “we are in a different place as a result of the Snowden disclosures” and that “his actions spurred a necessary debate” that prompted President Obama and Congress to change policies ... “I certainly think there could be a basis for a resolution that everybody could ultimately be satisfied with. I think the possibility exists.” ... Melanie Newman, chief spokeswoman for Attorney General Loretta Lynch ... immediately shot down the idea ... “This is an ongoing case so I am not going to get into specific details but I can say our position regarding bringing Edward Snowden back to the United States to face charges has not changed,” ... Robert Litt, the chief counsel to Director of National Intelligence ... recently privately floated the idea that the government might be open to a plea bargain in which Snowden returns to the United States, pleads guilty to one felony count and receives a prison sentence of three to five years in exchange for full cooperation with the government. ... Litt has made clear to Snowden’s representatives that “nothing is going to happen unless he comes in and moves off this idea, ‘I’m entitled to a medal.’” ... Snowden’s lawyer, said any felony plea by Snowden that results in prison time would be unacceptable to his client. ... any suggestion of leniency toward Snowden would likely run into strong political opposition in Congress as well as fierce resistance from hard-liners in the intelligence community who remain outraged over his wholesale disclosure of highly classified government documents. "
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Austerity fails again (Score 1) 1227 1227

When the article starts off with stuff like "elites all across the western world were gripped by austerity fever, a strange malady that combined extravagant fear with blithe optimism", you know you're not going to be getting an objective analysis.

Actually that's a pretty fair summary of the irrational behavior of the austerity fans.

You should have a look at the graph showing the degree of austerity (using a generally accepted metric) and the rate of recovery.

Note that austerity goes beyond cutting fat, it cuts to the bone and it does it without allowing time to adjust. It's a bad idea the same way it's a bad idea to unload a large stock holding all at once.

Greece has been cutting it's public sector quickly. So quickly that it has damaged recovery.

Comment: Fun, But Useless (Score 3, Funny) 94 94

This is a fun device that can show you what can be done with 3D printed plastic. That said, it's useless. It would be really cool if I could apply 1 pound of force to the crank, turn it a Million times, and have it apply a Million pounds of rotational force at the other end. But it's made of plastic, so it won't do that. Indeed, the fast-rotating parts would wear out before the slow-rotating part made a single turn. So it's not even good as a kind of clock.

All that said, it's a good conversation piece, and probably worth the price for that.

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