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+ - Some raindrops exceed their terminal velocity->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "New research reveals that some raindrops are “super-terminal” (they travel more than 30% faster than their terminal velocity, at which air resistance prevents further acceleration due to gravity). The drops are the result of natural processes—and they make up a substantial fraction of rainfall. Whereas all drops the team studied that were 0.8 millimeters and larger fell at expected speeds, between 30% and 60% of those measuring 0.3 mm dropped at super-terminal speeds. It’s not yet clear why these drops are falling faster than expected, the researchers say. But according to one notion, the speedy drops are fragments of larger drops that have broken apart in midair but have yet to slow down. If that is indeed the case, the researchers note, then raindrop disintegration happens normally in the atmosphere and more often than previously presumed—possibly when drops collide midair or become unstable as they fall through the atmosphere. Further study could improve estimates of the total amount of rainfall a storm will produce or the amount of erosion that it can generate."
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Comment: Did the fall of the Soviet Union (Score 1) 375

by MikeRT (#47727329) Attached to: Would Scottish Independence Mean the End of UK's Nuclear Arsenal?

Mean Russia gave up its nuclear arsenal? This title is a very stupid question. The rest of the UK is not going to give up the nukes because Scotland wants to secede, and Scotland will turn them over if it wants to ever have military cooperation from the rest of the UK, let alone the Five Eyes countries and probably NATO.

Comment: Learn the tools (Score 1) 548

by MikeRT (#47722333) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Do You Wish You'd Known Starting Out As a Programmer?

The best tools in a language's ecosystem will free you to actually use the language as intended. With Maven that's certainly the case. Once I committed myself to spending a few days really learning how Maven worked and trying various scenarios with it, I almost cried at how much opportunity cost I'd incurred from sticking with Java IDEs in the past before Maven was built in everywhere. By freeing me from Jar hell, making testing as easy as following a convention and "mvn test" and stuff like that, it got 75% of the drudge work out of the way immediately, leaving me to actually learn Java.

Comment: Oh it'll happen... (Score 3, Interesting) 723

by MikeRT (#47714887) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

The day that the various desktop environments decide to cut out the middlemen. When I can go grab an official KDE install disk that gives me a polished KDE experience with the latest kernel and Wayland from kde.org, that's the day Windows will start really hurting. Then I can say to my relatives "Linux? Just go get KDE" and there'll be no confusion anymore. If it's KDE compatible, it's KDE compatible. Load the binary, off you go. Just like OS X and Windows.

Comment: Bears repeating (Score 1, Insightful) 126

by MikeRT (#47614021) Attached to: Alleged Massive Account and Password Seizure By Russian Group

For those inclined to make moral equivocations between the NSA and the Russian government, both do what the NSA got caught doing. The difference is that the US Government would have the FBI kicking in this gang's door with a SWAT raid if they were Americans, whereas Putin is probably chuckling right now if he's reading about this.

+ - How Facebook Sold You Krill Oil

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "With its trove of knowledge about the likes, histories and social connections of its 1.3 billion users worldwide, Facebook executives argue, it can help advertisers reach exactly the right audience and measure the impact of their ads — while also, like TV, conveying a broad brand message. Facebook, which made $1.5 billion in profit on $7.9 billion in revenue last year, sees particular value in promoting its TV-like qualities, given that advertisers spend $200 billion a year on that medium. “We want to hold ourselves accountable for delivering results,” said Carolyn Everson, Facebook’s vice president for global marketing solutions, in a recent interview. “Not smoke and mirrors, maybe it works, maybe it doesn’t.”"

Comment: Want more profit? Just do right by the customer (Score 1) 234

by MikeRT (#47564865) Attached to: Comcast Confessions

I don't know any Comcast customer who has had a positive experience with their customer service. I also know some who've had Comcast blatantly disregard the details of their contract with respect to price and features a few months into a 12-24 month contract. Frankly, what Comcast needs besides competition from more companies and municipal broadband (via utilities) is a few strategic arrests of employees and executives for fraud. Put a few of their guys in prison for fraudulent business practices, and I'll wager their billing and sales people will wake the f#$% up and do right.

Comment: The saddest part (Score 1) 75

by MikeRT (#47519727) Attached to: Verizon's Offer: Let Us Track You, Get Free Stuff

Is that Verizon probably knows there's a market for this from market research...

After what's come out about corporations having to feed the surveillance beast, anyone who opts in should be subjected to having their house and cars wiretapped in perpetuity by the NSA with a direct feed to the FBI as the price for their nonchalance toward surveillance.

Comment: Elon Musk at Nokia?... (Score 4, Informative) 383

by MikeRT (#47475455) Attached to: Microsoft CEO To Slash 18,000 Jobs, 12,500 From Nokia To Go

You think Elon Musk went into Nokia with an understanding of what Nokia needed as a business? Or merely a view that whatever they were doing was wrong because it wasn't based on Microsoft stuff?

Don't you mean Stephen Elop? If Elon Musk had taken over Nokia, chances are Nokia would have ended up owning Samsung not being acquired by Microsoft.

Comment: When the great depression really hits (Score 4, Insightful) 134

by MikeRT (#47448543) Attached to: Apple Refutes Report On iPhone Threat To China's National Security

The NSA's actions will be regarded as the modern Smoot-Hawley which set forth the collapse in sales in one of America's last major export industries that set it into motion.

Though in fairness to the NSA, the American people are to blame for their "want my cake and eat it too" mentality on intelligence gathering. When it was discovered that the CIA did a lot of Really Bad Things because, shocker, that's par for the course in normal boots on the ground intelligence work we switched to electronics surveillance and created this mess.

Comment: Sure there is (Score 3, Insightful) 181

There is no enforcement mechanism in the event of a dispute with another country, however.

Any company rich enough to get there can probably afford to hire people to defend its claim. Within a few years, they'll probably be rich enough to outright buy a company like Blackwater to serve as a small army to defend their claim if need be. That's the real danger here.

Comment: Say what you will about the US (Score 4, Interesting) 100

But there are no credible reports of the US allowing criminals to just wantonly defraud Russian and Chinese citizens. While all of our governments spy on each other (and each other's economies), the US at least tends to take a dim view toward its citizens committing criminal acts against foreigners.

Comment: She's taking a stand for her own irresponsibility (Score 2, Insightful) 311

by MikeRT (#47418265) Attached to: Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

Seriously? Under what logic is it okay to publicly disseminate, often for the express purpose of humiliation, someone else's private photographs whether obtained illegally, surreptitiously, or shared in confidence with you?

You're missing the point. It's not ok, but it is a highly foreseeable consequence of taking nude photographs, much less disseminating them. You'd have to live under a rock and have a Pollyannaish view of human relations in 2014 to have no idea that this is a common consequence. Most often now, it probably happens because someone believes they are special and they won't fall victim to what so many others in their demographic have suffered. In that sense, it is precisely the sort of behavior one expects of a child because children and adolescents are almost completely incapable of believing "you're not special and it could damn well happen to you too."

Some people claim that the UNIX learning curve is steep, but at least you only have to climb it once.

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