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Comment Re:"Software Defined" Buzzword (Score 1) 40

All the innovations described in that paper are power Usage optimizations. Battery is still considered a source that has a number of energy units. For usage optimization that works. However, as more and more of a battery is understood, there are more parameters of a battery you can optimize: charging and storage behavior.

Submission + - NSF awards $74.5 million to support interdisciplinary cybersecurity research (nsf.gov)

aarondubrow writes: The National Science Foundation announced $74.5 million in grants for basic research in cybersecurity. Among the awards are projects to understand and offer reliability to cryptocurrencies; invent technologies to broadly scan large swaths of the Internet and automate the detection and patching of vulnerabilities; and establish the science of censorship resistance by developing accurate models of the capabilities of censors. According to NSF, long-term support for fundamental cybersecurity research has resulted in public key encryption, software security bug detection, spam filtering and more.

Submission + - Google Helped Cause the Mysterious Increase in 911 Calls SF Asked it to Solve

theodp writes: Android users have long complained publicly that it's way too easy to accidentally dial 911. So it's pretty astonishing that it took a team of Google Researchers and San Francisco Department of Emergency Management government employees to figure out that butt-dialing was increasing the number of 911 calls. The Google 9-1-1 Team presented its results in How Googlers helped San Francisco Use Data Science to Understand a Surge in 911 Calls, a Google-sponsored presentation at the Code for America Summit, and in San Francisco’s 9-1-1 Call Volume Increase, an accompanying 26-page paper.

Submission + - Government admits whole milk was always good for you

schwit1 writes: A new study has found that whole milk not only does not increase heart disease, it might even help prevent it.

The most significant part of this story however is that when the federal government made the original recommendation that people stop drinking whole milk to avoid fats, the science behind that recommendation was flawed and inconclusive.

But even as a Senate committee was developing the Dietary Goals, some experts were lamenting that the case against saturated fats was, though thinly supported, was being presented as if it were a sure thing. "The vibrant certainty of scientists claiming to be authorities on these matters is disturbing," George V. Mann, a biochemist at Vanderbilt's med school wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine. Ambitious scientists and food companies, he said, had "transformed [a] fragile hypothesis into treatment dogma."

As Morrissey says at the link, "Golly, doesn't that sound ... familiar?"

Submission + - "First, Let's Get Rid of All the Bosses" - the Zappos Management Experiment

schnell writes: The New Republic is running an in-depth look at online shoe retailer Zappos.com's experiment in a new "boss-less" corporate structure. Three years ago the company introduced a management philosophy that came from the software development world called "Holacracy," in which there are no "people managers" and groups self-organize based on individual creativity and talents. (When the change was announced, 14% of the company's employees chose to leave; middle management openly rebelled, but perhaps surprisingly the tech organization was slowest to embrace the new idea). The article shows that in this radically employee-centric environment, many if not most employees are thrilled and fulfilled, while others worry that self-organization in practical terms means chaos and a Maoist culture of "coercive positivity." Is Zappos the future of the American workplace, a fringe experiment, or something in between?

Submission + - Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data (theverge.com)

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.

Submission + - Cold Fusion Rears Ugly Head with Claims of Deuterium Powered Homes (hackaday.com)

szczys writes: Ah, who can forget the cold-fusion fiasco of the early 1990's? Promises of room-temperature fusion machines in every home providing nearly-free energy for all. Relive those glory days of hype with this report of Deuterium-Based Home Reactors. Elliot Williams does a good job of deflating the sensationalism by pointing out all of the "breakthroughs", their lack of having any other labs successfully verify the experiments, and the fact that many of the same players from the news stories in the 90s are once again wrapped up in this one.

Submission + - Dear FCC : Please don't kill my PC! (dearfcc.org)

An anonymous reader writes: This past year the FCC passed a set of rules that require manufacturers to thwart end-users from violating rules intended to keep the airwaves usable by all. Unfortunately the rules are such that they will do nothing to stop violators who have the knowledge and intent to bypass them and are already having massive collateral damage on non-violating users. Many people in the OpenWRT and LibreCMC communities are already seeing these locks in newer stock firmware images.

What we would like people to keep in mind is that these rules are not explicit to routers and will hamper other devices as well. Can't install your favourite distribution on a new computer? These rules may be to blame.

The EFF, FSF, Purple Foundation, OpenWRT, ThinkPenguin, Qualcomm, and others have been working diligently to stop this, but we need your help. This is your last chance to send in comments for a set of proposed rules that will make the situation even worse than it already is. For accurate information (there have been many factually inaccurate and misleading stories/quotes) check out the following blog post: http://prpl.works/2015/09/21/y... and send your comments into the FCC via the EFF's new DearFCC.org site: https://www.dearfcc.org/. Also see http://www.savewifi.org/.

This is your last chance to stop this. The comment period ends October 9th!

Additional thoughts: Canada and Europe are also passing a similar set of rules. This fight won't be over any time soon. However we won't win unless we can overcome and win the first battle: stopping the proposed rules in the USA.

Comment Re:"Software Defined" Buzzword (Score 3, Interesting) 40

Just as a software defined datacenter still needs lots of hardware. This is the same definition of software defined. There is plenty hardware available, But instead as using it as"just hardware", or "just a battery" you optimize it as it is used.

e.g. A Li-ion battery has more wear and tear if it is stored at 100% charge. So you only top it off if you expect the user to unplug it soon. (e.g when charging the phone in the night, you to it off an hour before wakeup).

If there are multiple batteries, with different parameters you can optimize for those parameters. And this is a "free"optimization. You get a few percentage extra capacity in the long run, just by exposing the batteries to the OS.

But you should not expect big leaps from this. Batteries are used in portable devices, which are weight and space contrained. with other words: they will have minimal specification.

Submission + - Europe's highest court just rejected the US's 'safe harbor' agreement (businessinsider.com)

craigtp writes: The European Court of Justice has just ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which lets American companies use a single standard for consumer privacy and data storage in both the US and Europe, is invalid.

The ruling came after Edward Snowden's NSA leaks showed that European data stored by US companies was not safe from surveillance that would be illegal in Europe.

This ruling could have profound effects on all US based companies, not just tech companies, that rely upon the "safe harbor" agreement to allow them to store their European customers' data in the US.

Under this new ruling, they could effectively be forced to store European customers' data in Europe and then have to follow 20 or more different sets of national data privacy regulations.

Submission + - EU Court Invalidates Europe-US Safe Harbour Data Sharing Agreement

Mickeycaskill writes: The top court of the European Union on Tuesday has suspended an agreement that has allowed data-sharing between the EU and the US for the past 15 years, following months of increased tensions over spying and the protection of personal data.

The ruling was the court’s final decision in a data-protection case brought by 27-year-old Austrian law student Max Schrems against the Irish data protection commissioner. Schrems was concerned his data on Facebook could be shared with US intelligence.

The court declared that Safe Harbour deal was “invalid” as it takes data on European citizens outside the protection of European authorities. The deal was originally intended to facilitate data-transfers to the US, a country whose data-protection regime is less stringent than that of the EU.

Safe Harbour has been enforced since 2000, but has been reviewed since 2013 following Edward Snowden's relevations about mass surveillance. A new agreement on a new deal is thought to be close, but the invalidation of the current agreement, in place since 2000, is likely to create difficulties for many trans-Atlantic companies in the short term.

Submission + - Humans Are More Toxic to Wildlife than Chernobyl (vice.com)

derekmead writes: The Chernobyl disaster remains the worst nuclear accident in human history, with a death toll that is difficult to tally even decades later. Given the sobering reach of the resulting radiation contamination, you might expect the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone—the 4,200 square kilometers in the immediate vicinity of the explosion—to have suffered serious long-term ecological damage.

Surprisingly, though, a study published today in Current Biology shows that wildlife in the exclusion zone is actually more abundant than it was before the disaster. According to the authors, led by Portsmouth University professor of environmental science Jim Smith, the recovery is due to the removal of the single biggest pressure on wildlife—humans.

A freelance is one who gets paid by the word -- per piece or perhaps. -- Robert Benchley