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Comment Re:Wildly expensive (Score 1) 76

So I have a hunch the copyright holders of these older movies will try to get much larger licensing fees out of MST3k this time around.

Maybe, if they're clueless. Lots of movies that were basically collecting dust have experienced a "revival" from being lampooned on MST3K. For example, Manos, the Hands of Fate is basically a household name among movie geeks these days. If your movie is truly pretty shit and it's not making any money for you, you know the old saying about bad publicity...

Comment Re:Bringing stuff back (Score 2) 76

Yeah, I hate to say it, but I don't particularly relish the idea of an aging Joel or Mike besmirching the memory of the original by attempting to reclaim the old magic.

It won't be either. They're not ruling out the old characters making cameos or something, but they're getting a new, younger host (some comedian) and a couple other new people to play the bots. Joel's mostly just running the show.

Submission + - Companies want to insert ads into Unicode

AmiMoJo writes: Food company Nestle has started a petition to get a KitKat emoji into the Unicode standard. They aren't alone, Taco Bell wants a taco emoji added, and Durex suggested adding a condom. While the latter two are at least generic, KitKat is a trademark of Nestle and the "break" image a key part of their marketing. Next year Unicode will include a faceplam emoji (U+1F926) for occasions such as this.

Submission + - Intel's Pentium Skylake + H110 Chipset Can Make For A Cheap Linux Desktop (

An anonymous reader writes: Outside of the limelight of Intel's Core "Skylake" processors is the cheapest model, a $60 Intel Pentium G4400 dual-core processor that runs at 3.3Gz and has built-in HD Graphics 510. Ubuntu Linux results for this CPU show the cut-down Skylake graphics are the worst aspect of this budget processor while the CPU performance is okay if speed isn't a big factor and your workloads don't mind the lack of AVX support. To pair with the cheap Skylake Pentium processors are more Intel H110-powered motherboards appearing, with some also retailing for under $60 while being basic yet functional as a severely cutdown version of the Intel Z170 chipset. If pursuing this route for a budget Linux PC, it's possible to build a socketed Skylake system for less than $200.

Submission + - Microphone 32 X more sensitive has been invented (

Taco Cowboy writes: A microphone which is 32 X more sensitive than regular microphone has recently been invented

Most microphones have the same componentry as a loudspeaker – in fact, they’re loudspeakers working in reverse, turning sound into electrical currents. When you speak, the sound waves travel towards the microphone, which impact a membrane that then vibrates. These vibrations are transferred to a metallic coil that then moves back and forth across a permanent magnet. A temporary electromagnet is created by the interaction of the magnetic field with the coil, and an electrical current is generated, which travels to an amplifier or a sound recording device. Nickel is normally used in the construction of the membrane

Replacing the Nickel with a graphine based membrane 30n carbon-atom thick, showed a remarkable 32-fold increase in sensitivity across a significant part of the audio spectrum: up to 11 kilohertz, across a dizzying array of amplitudes

The researchers also simulated a 300-layer thick graphene membrane, which has the potential to be even more sensitive; it could hypothetically detect frequencies of up to one megahertz, which is in the ultrasonic part of the spectrum. This has yet to be tested experimentally, though

This research shows that it is demonstrably possible for graphene to be used in a new generation of highly sensitive microphones, which will pick up far more sound detail than regular microphones do at present. Excitingly, highly sensitive ultrasonic microphones may also be on the cards

Submission + - Is it time for government to get out of the business of giving dietary advice? (

schwit1 writes: But that would mean giving up on so many opportunities for graft and self-importance and control over others.

With the release of the eighth edition of the U.S. government’s Dietary Guidelines expected by year’s end, it seems reasonable to consider—with the “obesity plague” upon us and Americans arguably less healthy than ever before—whether the guidelines are to be trusted and even whether they have done more harm than good.

Many Americans have lost trust in the science behind the guidelines since they seem to change dramatically every five years. In February, for example, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee declared that certain fats and eggs are no longer the enemy and that cholesterol is “not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.” This, after decades of advising Americans to “watch their cholesterol.”

Such controversy is nothing new. U.S. Dietary Guidelines were first released by the Agriculture Department and the Department of Health and Human Services in 1980. One nutrition expert at the time, Edward “Pete” Ahrens, a groundbreaking researcher on fat and cholesterol metabolism, called the guidelines “a nutritional experiment with the American public as subjects . . . treating them like a homogeneous group of Sprague-Dawley rats.”

The original goals were to: 1) increase Americans’ carbohydrate consumption to 55%-60% of caloric intake; 2) reduce fat consumption to less than 30% from 40% of caloric intake; 3) reduce saturated fat to 10% of calories and increase poly- and monounsaturated fats each to 10% of calories; 4) reduce cholesterol intake to less than 300 milligrams a day; 5) reduce sugar intake by 40%; and 6) reduce salt consumption by 50%-80%.

These six goals, viewed in the context of what we know today, could hardly be more misdirected.

If only we could hold them liable the way we would if they were pharmaceutical companies that produced similarly defective and harmful products.

Comment Re:Lack of network connectivity is a deal breaker (Score 2) 120

The problem is that the USB port now requires a special cable which not all of us have lying around in quantity. It doesn't make it impossible, but it does make it more of a hassle.

Micro USB is hardly a "special cable" by any stretch.
It's the same cable and connector all of the raspberry pi models use for power

Pretty much all tablets and smart phones except Apples use them these days.
Also a good number of USB wall chargers typically have a USB-A on them and include a USB-A to Micro USB cable.

I was quite saddened to see most Slashdot posters don't even have a cheap-o $5 USB keyboard or ten laying around, and not including one with the original Pi being labeled "a deal breaker" - but really, no one around these parts has massive piles of both of those parts and more laying around anymore?

Submission + - Bill Gates to Headline Paris Climate Talks

theodp writes: The NY Times and others report that Bill Gates will announce the creation of a multibillion-dollar clean energy fund on Monday at the opening of the two-week long Paris Climate Change Conference. The climate summit, which will be attended by President Obama and 100+ world leaders, is intended to forge a global accord to cut planet-warming emissions. The pending announcement was first reported by ClimateWire. A spokesman for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation did not respond to a request for comment. Let's hope it goes better than BillG school reform!

Comment Re:Which one is sub-$10? (Score 1) 120

Which one is sub-$10?
Unless you get your hands on the MagPi or live near one of the twenty-five Micro Center locations in the USA

The later being exactly what I did. The Pi Zeros were $5 each, and I now have two of them.
The CHIP isn't being sold anywhere yet, either online nor Microcenter.

So the answer to your question is "The Pi Zero"

Comment Steve Jobs was abusive, but good at marketing. (Score 1) 224

You think you found an outlet for your anger! You feel superior!

Stories like this Slashdot story did not happen when Steve Jobs was running Apple. Why? Jobs was very careful to assure secrecy until he was ready to announce a finished product.

What happened in this case? Apparently someone at Apple was negotiating with LG. From one of the articles: "In light of the decision, South Korea's LG Display is already planning capacity upgrades." Whoever was negotiating didn't make clear that no information should be made public.

There have been other seriously bad communications errors at Apple since Tim Cook has been in charge. Apparently, even though Tim Cook worked with Steve Jobs for years, Mr. Cook did not learn about marketing from Mr. Jobs.

Comment Re:Increase productivity?? (Score 1) 441

So it's essentially inconceivable that any drug could make you creative. However it seems plausible that some drugs could act as a kind of adjuvant to creative struggle when you're approaching a creative breakthrough. Such breakthroughs often come at a time when you're critical faculties are slightly deranged; when you're exhausted; dropping off to sleep; or just say "screw it for now" and do something unrelated.

Hell, I've solved weird computer problems before with a case of beer sitting next to me. I'm one of those weird people where micro-doses of ethanol -- say, downing can after can of Pabst Blue Ribbon -- actually mostly has a stimulant effect. It excites the part of my brain that likes alcohol but it doesn't get me drunk enough, fast enough to have the "downer" effect that it's supposed to have. (Real ale, wine, liquor, different story.) It will actually allow me to stay up all night, and at around 3am -- et voila!

Comment Re:Important to note (Score 1) 441

You are conflating psychedelic use with opiate use.

A friend of mine used to do Olympic style weightlifting (the competitive kind, not the bodybuilding). His coach used to tell him that back in the 60s and 70s, those guys would down anything they could get their hands on. None of it was very well researched, so there were lots of theories about which ones could potentially be "performance enhancing." LSD was definitely something they were using, and it wasn't uncommon to see lifters have complete freakouts on the platform (though to be fair, they were probably on a ton of speed at the same time).

A fanatic is a person who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill