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Comment: Re:ISP choice? (Score 3, Insightful) 379

by stinerman (#48983155) Attached to: Confirmed: FCC Will Try To Regulate Internet Under Title II

Um...yes! I do get a choice for electricity and gas provider at least.

The old monopoly (AEP/Columbia Gas) is in charge of maintaining the physical infrastructure, but I can buy the actual electrons/gas from anyone who wants to provide them. Sounds like exactly what we need in terms of infrastructure. The old monopoly handles the wiring, but anyone can provide services over the wires.

Comment: Re:That's like ... (Score 3, Insightful) 779

by stinerman (#48960817) Attached to: WA Bill Takes Aim at Boys' Dominance In Computer Classes

I think that is right, actually.

We know that women generally are under-represented in the STEM fields. Is that because women generally are simply less interested in those type of jobs due to genetics or is it because of environmental factors? I think there's a bit of both, but I have a hard time believing it's all nurture and no nature.

We know that women are over-represented in primary school education positions. Its the same thing reversed. I don't think men (on average) want to teach a bunch of 8 year olds, but there's probably some environmental factors there as well (you want to be around a bunch of little girls all day, what are you a pedophile?).

There is only a problem here to the extent that people are choosing not to study a particular field because they feel like they'll be a nerd or pedophile or whatever for choosing that field.

Comment: Re:How does deflating even help? (Score 1) 239

by stinerman (#48958513) Attached to: NFL Asks Columbia University For Help With Deflate-Gate

When a football is under-inflated it becomes easier to grip. There is more "give" to the ball. This would help in throwing more accurately and making catching easier. The effect on a ball-carrier fumbling is negligible.

In the NFL (and probably lower levels -- I know when I was in high school it was this way), each team supplies its own balls for when it is on offense. When the other team gains possession, the other team's balls come in play. In fact, one of the reasons this was detected is because the defense intercepted a pass and the player noticed that the ball was under-inflated. He gave the ball to his own equipment manager when he noticed it was not quite right.

Comment: If I was running a school system ... (Score 1) 233

by stinerman (#48493577) Attached to: Football Concussion Lawsuits Start To Hit High Schools

And you'd be ran out of town.

In many places in small town america, high school sports (especially football and basketball) are a big entertainment draw. In my hometown of 6,000, it was not unusual to see over 1,000 people at a football game.

I hate to say it, but most people are more interested in winning the state championship than in leading the state in graduation rates.

Comment: Re:TWC are (surprise, surprise) crooks and thieves (Score 1) 223

by stinerman (#48383067) Attached to: Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

Declare all exclusivity/franchise agreements null and void

Exclusive franchise agreements haven't been allowed since 1992.

The Communications Act requires that no new cable operator may provide service without a franchise and establishes several policies relating to franchising requirements and franchise fees. The Communications Act authorizes local franchising authorities to grant one or more franchises within their jurisdiction. However, a local franchising authority may not grant an exclusive franchise, and may not unreasonably withhold its consent for new service.

Its a natural monopoly. The infrastructure needs to be separate from the services.

I'm lucky. I live in an area where I have about 4 choices for TV/Internet/etc. That's still not enough.

Comment: Re:A minority view? (Score 1) 649

by stinerman (#47267543) Attached to: Teaching Creationism As Science Now Banned In Britain's Schools

AFAICT, it looks like you can't use God scientific evidence of anything. This makes sense because the existence of a creator cannot be empirically determined (can you think of a repeatable experiment that would prove or disprove that there is a creator?). That is unless the creator revealed himself to us, at which point, the study of the creator would be a science.

Who goeth a-borrowing goeth a-sorrowing. -- Thomas Tusser

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