Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:I'm neither for or against Microsoft, but as a (Score 1) 291

by PensivePeter (#32113292) Attached to: Microsoft Office 2010, Dissected
We've been using Microsoft's Business Productivity Online Services (BPOS) since its launch last year. All the advantages of managing our own infrastructure without any of the disadvantages of actually managing it.
For mail, the synchronisation between the Exchange server and Outlook clients using AJAX is simply the best for in office, online and on the road, offline mail management from different client machines.
The help and support is 24/7 with impressive turnaround of incidents.

Comment: Re:You were not... (Score 1) 24

by snowgirl (#32112904) Attached to: The audacity of austerity

Every business other than those suckling at the government teat is struggling.

The US has 600 billion dollars for the budget of the military. The next closest country is only spending about 60 billion USD.

A lot of our defense budget goes to businesses suckling at the government teat.

What we need is the federal government to get it's grabby claws out of anything other than national defense and securing private property which would cut spending considerably.

Oh, so we would keep that 600 billion a year of overkill spending... ok.

And securing private property... actually, that's more of a state, and local government responsibility... they determine how land is transfered, what is property, etc. When I have something stolen from me, I don't call the FBI, I call the local police.

Ok, so those two, and you've stated this is an exhaustive list of what the federal government should be in... so... each state then governs its own immigration rules, we each establish our own interstate and international commerce rules, handle their own money, of course they'd have to take care of their own post and mail services, patrol and enforce their individual laws on the various bodies of water, throw D.C. and the other various territories into autonomous governing regions, and of course, each state will individually have to handle their own civil rights doctrines...

Yeah, national defense and securing private property. We don't need all that other frivolous crap...

Comment: Re:DMCA still makes it illegal (Score 1) 405

by Voyager529 (#31903606) Attached to: In Defense of Jailbreaking

ANY cell phone can disrupt cellular traffic, conversely a group of parts from Radio Shack can also be combined to disrupt cellular traffic. Even so, are you saying that there's just as tangible a danger with an improperly modded gun as there is with an improperly modded cell phone? Personally, I'll take my chances with the guy with the phone. Oh, and even if I modded a cell phone maliciously, odds are the traffic corruption would be "such a tiny change...as to be undetectable".

When I owned an iPhone, I in fact purchased it secondhand from a friend and thus signed NO contract with AT&T. Apple has been working to thwart the jailbreaking scene since the original iPhone was released, back when AT&T wasn't subsidizing a dime of the phone. Even if I did, AT&T allows you to keep the phone if you pay the ETF. If I sign up, get an iPhone, and then pay the ETF, then I am JUST as within the terms of my contract as if I carried the 2 year agreement to term. It'd be stealing if I did the above without paying the ETF and thus was in violation of the contract.

"You don't go out and kick a mad dog. If you have a mad dog with rabies, you take a gun and shoot him." -- Pat Robertson, TV Evangelist, about Muammar Kadhafy

Working...