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Comment: All autmoatics are "self-driving" already (Score 1) 406

by PensivePeter (#47624265) Attached to: Idiot Leaves Driver's Seat In Self-Driving Infiniti, On the Highway
Unless you remember to slip into neutral or park, you can get out of the driving seat of an automatic and the car will "drive" itself and that's always been the case: how many times have I seen an altercation when one driver slams on the brakes and jumps out to argue with someone, only for the car to start off again before he can barely get out of his seat.
Fortunately, "driving" is still considered in law as an activity requiring control of *all* the vehicles functions while the engine is switched on. Lane-control is not the same as "driving" although you'd have a hard time convincing many Californians.

Comment: Disingenuous and poor marketing (Score 1) 113

by PensivePeter (#47582305) Attached to: Countries Don't Own Their Internet Domains, ICANN Says
ICANN could reasonably argue that the ccTLDs are "licensed" in some form or another - but that doesn't in itself invalidate the ownership of said *license*. I "own" the exclusive right to operate and manage my domain for as long as I renew on time and the domain registrar plays by the rules. No reason to assume that TLD's operate any differently.
But ICANN seem to want their cake and eat it. "The domains are not property and can't be owned" they cry, at the same time as asserting that only ICANN can assign (and presumably revoke) them. If they really aren't property, then please stand aside and watch the storm brew.
Worst of all, it seems like a marketing own goal and great ammunition for those who would wrest ccTLD control away from ICANN and have it run by a UN agency or similar.

Comment: Re:Expensive and irrelevant (Score 1) 213

by PensivePeter (#47582111) Attached to: Vint Cerf on Why Programmers Don't Join the ACM
I had the same experience with IEEE. Nice when you're looking for something to go on your resume but otherwise expensive and close to zero value. They are also aggressive in their marketing and landgrabs moving in to any field of activity where they think they can make some money, irrespective of whether they have any comptenece in that field or not. "Hammer, meet some new nails".

Comment: Driverless may also mean ownerless (Score 1) 435

by PensivePeter (#47479413) Attached to: FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars
If a car doesn't need a driver, then the expensive piece of capital investment that a car represents is simply shuttling passengers around. Such cars will or could be put to work without the owner - it's not just a matter of "send it back home after my commute to pick up the spouse to go shopping", it could also be "pick up x number of people on y number of routes on the way back to my house to maximize use of the vehicle.....err, which is what Google and Uber are presumably heading towards, no? We'll pay you to use your driverless vehicle...how many people would fall for that (and everything it implies).
But at what point do the scales tip and simply doesn't make any economic sense to own a vehicle (except for the pious and pompous Silicon Valley showoffs who want everyone to know about their Tesla)

Comment: Re:Sad, sad times... (Score 1) 333

Well, our education systems encourage snappy responses and speed tests not deep thinking. Watch a movie made in the last decade and the average transition time between cuts is around 3-5 seconds, compared with 15-20 a couple of decades back. Managers of public spaces HATE silence - and prefer to fill it with vacuous muzak than let people sit or walk in silence. We are everywhere surrounded by the sound bite, the elevator pitch, the latest catch phrase or advertising jingle. Is it any surprise that younger people are uncomfortable with silence and rest when we've prepared the ground so well for exactly the opposite?

Comment: Only one piece of technology that makes the grade (Score 1) 143

by PensivePeter (#47378995) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Replacing Paper With Tablets For Design Meetings?
Surface. Yep, Microsoft's Surface, particularly the new Pro 3 running OneNote allows real time note taking with a very good quality stylus, instant on (click the pen and a new page opens ready to work, even if you're tablet is locked - a stroke of genius), you can pull in and cross reference Word docs, PPTs, web pages, etc. and the whole is synced real time back end to other devices. Need to take a photo of notes on a whiteboard, use the OfficeLens app on your phone and it gets sent to OneNote, optimized (reflections, stuff of the board, etc. eliminated) and does an OCR of what's there if the handwriting is half decent. I use this every day - I manage or participate in half a dozen different types of meetings every day. Fan boy? Of this product, yup. OneNote on a tablet was always good but MSFT treated it like a poor cousin - they finally understand the potential and have provided a kick ass product for EXACTLY this niche. There is no other product close to Surface for responding to this kind of usage scenario. And if just f^&*ing works. Really.

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