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+ - Vodafone admits warentless wiretaping->

Submitted by Charliemopps
Charliemopps (1157495) writes "According to Vodafone 29 governments have installed equipment that collects data on its customers without a warrant. This includes metadata, location, data, and voice. This is a rather long, and very interesting report. Vodafone is the first telecommunications company to voluntarily release this kind of information."
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+ - Parents Mobilize Against States' Student Data Mining

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "To paraphrase Paul Simon, the government would like to know a little bit about your children for their files. But Politico reports that parents have mobilized into an unexpected political force to fight the data mining of their children, catapulting student privacy to prominence in statehouses. Having already torpedoed the $100 million Bill Gates-funded inBloom database project, which could have made it easier for schools to share confidential student records with private companies, the amateur activists are now rallying against another perceived threat: huge state databases being built to track children for more than two decades, from as early as infancy through the start of their careers. "The Education Department," writes Stephanie Simon, "lists hundreds of questions that it urges states to answer about each child in the public school system: Did she make friends easily as a toddler? Was he disciplined for fighting as a teen? Did he take geometry? Does she suffer from mental illness? Did he go to college? Did he graduate? How much does he earn?" Leonie Haimson, a NY mother who is organizing a national Parent Coalition for Student Privacy says, "Every parent I’ve talked to has been horrified. We just don’t want our kids tracked from cradle to grave." For their part, ed tech entrepreneurs and school reformers are both bewildered by and anxious about the backlash — and struggling to craft a response, having assumed parents would support their vision: to mine vast quantities of data for insights into what’s working, and what’s not, for individual students and for the education system as a whole. "People took for granted that parents would understand [the benefits], that it was self-evident," said Michael Horn, a co-founder an education think tank."

+ - Cable companies reportedly funding fake consumer groups to attack net neutrality->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "VICE believes that the nation's cable companies are funding groups that pretend to represent consumers, but are actually just parroting their own stance to shout down the general public. For instance, the outlet has learned that Broadband for America, which describes itself as a coalition involving "independent consumer advocacy groups," and which counts senator John Sununu amongst its members, is actually funded by the NCTA — big cable's lobbyists. It's the same situation with the American Consumer Institute, another anti-net neutrality voice of the people, which just happens to receive the bulk of its funding from the CTIA, which represents the US wireless industry. Now, what was the thing our grandma told us about astroturfing? Oh right: if you have to invent spokespeople to represent the other side in the debate, you're probably not the good guys."
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+ - IPMI Protocol Vulnerabilities Have Long Shelf Life->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 (2804139) writes "If enterprises are indeed moving services off premises and into the cloud, there are four letters those companies’ IT organizations should be aware of: IPMI.

Short for Intelligent Platform Management Interface, these tiny computers live as an embedded Linux system attached to the motherboards of big servers from vendors such as IBM, Dell and HP. IPMI is used by a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) to manage Out-of-Band communication, essentially giving admins remote control over servers and devices, including memory, networking capabilities and storage. This is particularly useful for hosting providers and cloud services providers who must manage gear and data in varied locations.

Noted researchers Dan Farmer, creator of the SATAN vulnerability scanner, and HD Moore, creator of Metasploit, have been collaborating on research into the vulnerabilities present in IPMI and BMCs and the picture keeps getting uglier. Last July, Farmer and Moore published some research on the issue based upon work Farmer was doing under a DARPA Cyber Fast Track Grant that uncovered a host of vulnerabilities, and Internet-wide scans for the IPMI protocol conducted by Moore.

Yesterday, Farmer released a paper called “Sold Down the River,” in which he chastises big hardware vendors for ignoring security vulnerabilities and poor configurations that are trivial to find and exploit."

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+ - Google CENSORS Adrian Crenshaw. Operation-Irongeek fights back... #opirongeek 2

Submitted by richi
richi (74551) writes "Google massively raised the ire of the infosec community yesterday. Its utterly-reliable YouTube moderators nuked the account of the infamous Irongeek (Adrian Crenshaw). It surely couldn't have been a simple false-positive mistake, right? Because Google says it already "reviewed" the "repeated or severe violations" that led to the censorship.

So, that's all right then. No evil done here. Move along."

+ - Where Have You Gone, Peter Norton?->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "If you used an PC in the 1980s and 1990s, the chances were very good that you used utility software which came in a box with a picture of Peter Norton on it. The Norton brand still exists, but those packaging photos of Norton himself are long gone--along with the whole classic era of utility software they represented. Over at Technologizer, I paid tribute to this one-time icon of the PC industry."
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+ - IE6 Finally Falls Below 5% Market Share

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The third quarter of 2013's browser war is now over. The latest market share numbers from Net Applications show Internet Explorer was the biggest winner last month, and that its most hated version finally fell below the 5 percent mark. IE7 was down 0.17 percentage points to 1.37 percent and IE6 slipped a huge 1.22 percentage points to 4.86 percent."

+ - Captain Cyborg is back! Kevin Warwick predicts the future.

Submitted by richi
richi (74551) writes "Kevin Warwick: His name raises extremes of opinion.

For more than a decade, this highly controversial cybernetics professor has been making waves. His high-profile experiments—and even higher-profile claim that he’s the first living cyborg—earned him column inches and unflattering nicknames.

In this Forbes interview, "Captain Cyborg" talks about exploding motorcycles, wireless power, and fish'n'chips."

+ - Symantec seizes part of massive botnet used for BitCoin mining and click fraud->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "The cybercriminals behind ZeroAccess, one of the largest botnets in existence, have lost access to more than a quarter of the infected machines they controlled because of an operation executed by security researchers from Symantec. According to Symantec, the ZeroAccess botnet consists of more than 1.9 million infected computers and is used primarily to perform click fraud and Bitcoin mining in order to generate revenues estimated at tens of millions of dollars per year."
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+ - Congress reaches agreement... on helium->

Submitted by gbrumfiel
gbrumfiel (1917934) writes "With just hours to go before a government shutdown, Congress has finally found something it can agree on. Unfortunately, that something isn't a budget: it's helium. the US holds vast helium reserves which it sells to scientists and private industry. According to NPR, a new law was needed to allow the helium to continue to flow. Congress passed it late last week, but only after a year-long lobbying effort and intense debate (and in the end, Senator Ted Cruz opposed the measure). Can a new bipartisanship rise out of this cooperation? Or will hot air prevail on Capitol Hill? *Insert your helium joke here*"
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NASA

+ - Vesta is a Baby Planet, Not an Asteroid->

Submitted by
astroengine
astroengine writes "Vesta, the second largest object in the main asteroid belt, has an iron core, a varied surface, layers of rock and possibly a magnetic field — all signs of a planet in the making, not an asteroid. This is the conclusion of an international team of scientists treated to a virtual front row seat at Vesta for the past 10 months, courtesy of NASA's Dawn robotic probe. Their findings were presented during a NASA press conference on Thursday. As to why Vesta never made it to full planethood, scientists point to Jupiter. When the giant gas planet formed, nearby bodies such as Vesta found their orbits perturbed. "Jupiter started to act like a spoon in a pot, stirring up the asteroid belt and the asteroids started bumping into one another," Dawn lead scientist Christopher Russell, with the University of California, Los Angeles, told Discovery News. "If they're just out there gently orbiting and everything is going smoothly, then without Jupiter in the picture, they would gather mass and get bigger and bigger and bigger. But with Jupiter there, stirring the pot, then the asteroids start bumping into one another and breaking apart, so nothing grew in that region, but started to shrink.""
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+ - The Trouble With ACTA: Geist's Analysis of Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Earlier this year, Canadian law professor Michael Geist appeared at the European Parliament's INTA Committee Workshop on ACTA and delivered a ten-minute takedown of the agreement. Geist's full report to the European Parliament has now been released. It conclues that ACTA's harm greatly exceeds its potential benefits and recommends rejecting the agreement in its current form."
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Encryption

+ - Buyer's Guide to Full Disk Encryption ->

Submitted by
kongshem
kongshem writes "Hardly a week goes by without news of a security breach stemming from the loss or theft of a storage medium containing confidential yet unencrypted data. Here's one recent example: http://www.esecurityplanet.com/network-security/california-dccs-suffers-security-breach.html

It begs the question: Why don't more organizations encrypt their hard drives and other storage media? It's compatively painless to do so, as this article explains:

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/mobile-security/buyers-guide-to-full-disk-encryption.html"

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MSDOS is not dead, it just smells that way. -- Henry Spencer

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