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Comment: Re:Never read the book, but (Score 1) 108

by wonkey_monkey (#49388861) Attached to: Coup in Arrakis Capitol Leaves Region in Flux

Well, name any other big ticket movie where you actually hear the character's thoughts as a voice over

What would that prove, either way? Does that mean something like Memento (which, incidentally, opens with a scene "narrated" by the character's real-time inner thoughts) "fails the medium" because no other film shares its structure?

Dune's quite a unique film.

Comment: Re:Never read the book, but (Score 1) 108

by wonkey_monkey (#49388215) Attached to: Coup in Arrakis Capitol Leaves Region in Flux

Because books are a different medium.

That doesn't explain why you think* it's okay to present a person's inner thoughts on paper, but not on film.

*not that there's anything wrong with thinking that, but your wording implies that you think it's an objective truth.

because books can be written in third person or "God" mode

And films are (usually) shot in third person or "God" mode, so what's the difference there?

In case I wasn't clear (I hadn't realised you haven't read the books before) I was specifically talking about the Dune books when I mentioned literary inner thoughts. They're in there, just like they are in the film, and they're integral to understanding the characters. There's no way you could convey their meaning with a bit of "smell the fart" acting.

but expressions and actions are only described, not seen.

I don't see how that has any bearing on the portroyal of inner thoughts. In books, they're written down. In films, they're spoken. I don't see why one should be inherently better than the other.

Comment: Re:Never read the book, but (Score 1) 108

by wonkey_monkey (#49387515) Attached to: Coup in Arrakis Capitol Leaves Region in Flux

If you, as a director and/or screenwriter, cannot get across the character's thoughts through action and expression, but have to resort to voice overs instead, you've really failed your medium.

Why doesn't the same apply to the books? There are "voiceovers" throughout.

I'd much rather have Dune's voiceovers that have to be subjected to an "as you know" speech.

Comment: Re:Way too many humanities majors (Score 1) 368

by HornWumpus (#49386533) Attached to: Why America's Obsession With STEM Education Is Dangerous

Why would they want to? Most of the humanities profs couldn't pass it.

I'm still waiting for the 'Emperors New Clothes' moment. But 'they' really will have a hard time topping some of the stupid things they've already said. If Chomsky still gets respect, despite being an apologist for genocide (among many other 'bad things'), there is no fixing it.

Yes I know 'computational linguistics' is a grey area, but Chomsky's work is not. His primary assertion 'Brains have language wired in' seems to be proving out to be wrong. Only took 40 years.

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