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Comment: Re:Pre-mapped environments are a dead end (Score 1) 279

by Lumpy (#48217981) Attached to: Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

Programming a race car to drive a perfectly mapped track is brain dead easy for even a 2nd year CS student.

Let cattle roam the track randomly, and the car drives at racing speed avoiding cows, goats, etc randomly darting in front of the car, then I'll be impressed.

Comment: Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (Score 1) 279

by Lumpy (#48217971) Attached to: Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

"Imagine a wage worker making $20/hr produces the factory sensor part, at a rate of 100 per hour through the operation of a machine."

Will never happen. Reality is very different...

Imagine a wage worker making $8/hr produces the factory sensor part, at a rate of 100 per hour through the operation of a machine.

Executives do NOT want to pay living wages. It will be an $8 an hour job or outsourced to China where they pay $3.25 an hour.

Comment: UNIX certification (Score 1, Offtopic) 9

by Phroggy (#48217587) Attached to: SMART Begins Live Public Robocar Tests In Singapore

The article makes a big deal of Mac OS X's UNIX certification. Although it didn't hurt, the certification really had nothing to do with the rise in popularity of the Mac. Using open source code certainly allowed Apple to take advantage of (and then build upon) the cool stuff we've enjoyed on Linux for years, but what broke Microsoft's stranglehold on the consumer mindset was really the iPod, and later the iPhone. That's what made people think that buying a Mac might be a viable alternative to Windows. Of course once they made the switch, users were able to see that the technology really works, but without the iPod, most people would never have considered the Mac as an option.

There were other factors at work too:

  • Poor support for Vista when it launched made people desperate for an alternative
  • The rising popularity of Firefox made web developers stop building sites that only worked in IE on Windows

Comment: Re:We had a distributed social network (Score 2) 228

by IamTheRealMike (#48215593) Attached to: We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello

If you ignore the ability to restrict personal data to particular people, news feed with intelligent ranking that tries to guess who your real friends are so you don't have to upset people who post a lot by defriending them, the ability to tag people in photos, the lack of any need for meaningless URLs and a seamless way of organising events ...... then sure. Facebook is just like the web.

Comment: Slashdot LOVES cell phone tracking (Score 1) 157

by evilviper (#48215365) Attached to: Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

I don't know what it is, but slashdot editors just LOVE the hell out of cell phone tracking. I mean, there has probably been a story or two on the subject before now:

http://slashdot.org/story/05/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/05/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/05/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/05/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/02/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/02/0...

http://slashdot.org/story/06/0...

http://slashdot.org/story/07/0...

http://slashdot.org/story/12/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/06/1...

http://slashdot.org/story/02/1...

Everyone go out and find all the cell phone tracking stories you can, and submit every one to /. They love it when you do that!

Comment: Re:backup for 911 (Score 1) 115

by evilviper (#48215259) Attached to: Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

What are the odds your family isn't all on a single cellular carrier, making you unable to take advantage of such redundancy?

Verizon and Sprint are compatible, while AT&T and T-Mobile are compatible. And with them all switching to LTE, it's likely they will all be mutually compatible in a few more years, when manufacturers start selling multi-band LTE phones.

Most every post-paid cellular plan includes voice roaming. Even if you're not paying for roaming normally, when you dial 911, all restrictions are dropped, and your cell will connect to any available tower from any provider that it can.

Comment: Re:Wow... (Score 1) 334

by afidel (#48214949) Attached to: The Classic Control Panel In Windows May Be Gone

That's just it, you can't. The classic desktop is gone..or hidden to the point where system breaking hacks are needed to bring it back, and it's bugged

What ever are you blabbering about, in Windows 8.1 you can choose to boot to the desktop, and in 8.1 Update it's the default if Windows doesn't detect a touch interface device. Windows 10 is going to extend this to automagically switch back and forth for convertible devices (by default, you will be able to turn the behavior off if you wish) and the desktop view is getting a real start menu with the addition of a live tiles interface (this is an improvement over both Win 7 and 8 as the live tiles give you at a glance information like mobile widgets but they no longer jar you out of the desktop experience like the start screen does in 8).

Comment: Re:Performance issues? (Score 4, Insightful) 158

by afidel (#48214791) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Smarter Disk Space Monitoring In the Age of Cheap Storage?

Inner tracks have better seek times, which is why high performance applications often "short stroke" drives (ie artificially restrict the percentage of the drive used so that only the inner tracks are utilized, though with modern drives and transparent sector remapping it's unlikely this practices actually works), outer tracks have better streaming performance because more sectors move under the head in a given timeframe.

Comment: Re:We have more but we USE more. (Score 2) 158

by afidel (#48214731) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Smarter Disk Space Monitoring In the Age of Cheap Storage?

YOU don't use 10's of GB at a time, but I bet your organization does. My company has expanded their storage by 50% per year compounded for at least the last 10 years (I've been here 8 and I have 2 years of backup reports from before I started), and I don't think we're that unusual if you look at the industry reports for GB shipped per year.

Comment: Re:Sigh... (Score 1) 158

by afidel (#48214483) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Smarter Disk Space Monitoring In the Age of Cheap Storage?

Adding 10% space AND notifying the sysadmin that autogrowth has happened is probably the best way IMHO, because it keeps things from crashing/locking up (most apps aren't happy to get an out of space notification) while allowing the intelligent person to investigate the root cause if they suspect an unusual cause (ie if my database server is growing its disk it's likely to be a bad query filling tempdb, I don't want the database to halt but I also want to figure out what the bad query is, but if a file server fills a volume it's almost always just the users adding more documents which I can't really tell them to stop doing).

It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876

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