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Comment: Re:10+ is winning... (Score 1) 958

by Yosho (#29679399) Attached to: How many countries have you visited?

What was your point?

His point was that your entire country is only slightly larger than his state, and there are many European countries that are smaller. This isn't a penis-measuring contest, it's a statement of fact. He (and many other Americans) has to get on a plane and fly for thousands of miles to visit another country. The only ones who don't are the ones who live close to the borders with Canada and Mexico, and if you want to visit any country other than those, you have to get on a plane and fly overseas. It's not as easy as getting in a car and taking a road trip.

Comment: Re:That essay provided bugs me. (Score 1) 441

by turing_m (#29674443) Attached to: MIT Axes the 500-Word Application Essay

Also, most large organisms including humans and cows, contain more bacteria cells than human (or cow) cells.

In the muscle tissue itself? On the surface and in the intestinal tract, yes. The meat the hamburger begins "life" as should be sterile. Of course, in the process of being ground up the meat will receive a small amount of bacteria from the surfaces of the equipment and the air, but those surfaces would be washed regularly.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=291225

Comment: Re:a scary thing of manipulating URL? (Score 1) 183

by defaria (#29674077) Attached to: Massive Phishing Campaign Hits Multiple Email Services

I get these phishy emails all the time but I look at the actual URL and see it is not actually coming from the service or agency. One time I saw it vectored to a site which I did a whois lookup of the domain name and it listed the name, address, and phone number of someone in southern Calif (not China).

At which point you should have called them and informed them of the illegal activity. And if they didn't response with a "Thanks for reporting this and we'll get right on it" but instead hung up then follow up with a call to the FBI. That's how you stop such behavior!

However, the scary thing is what happens if these people figure a way to "scoop" or "fraud" (whatever) the URL displayed on bottom of my browser window and in the address bar?

That's why you "Use the source Luke". Look at the actual source of the message and see in plain text there (well HTML with tags but it's all ASCII and usually not that hard to figure out) what the exact actual URL is. And if you have a mailer that is incapable of showing you the actual source then I suggest to you that you need a better mailer!

But on identity theft they say most of it was done with basic skills like going through someone's trash or bank employees (72% of banks report employees committed fraud).

Exactly, which is why most of the hype about this is just that hype. However when you are dealing with large numbers there will be a percentage of people who really are that stupid. It's why we have spam and why we have phishing in the first place...

Comment: Re:Why did he do it? (Score 1) 389

by hldn (#29674013) Attached to: Cyber-criminal Left In Charge of Prison Computer Network

Why would he pull a stunt like this? So he can get an extended prison sentence, and have no hope of being let out on parole? When you're in prison, do you want to piss off the prison staff? Do you know what happens when you do that? Idiot.

the behavior of people in prison isn't known for being particularly logical. just watch any television show about prison life, there's a reason those people are in there.

Comment: Re:Information wants to be free (Score 1) 177

by hairyfeet (#29673783) Attached to: Court Rules For Software Ownership Over Licensing

Nice theory, except I ALREADY TRIED THAT with the RIAA and haven't bought a single disc from an RIAA artist (nor have I pirated from them) in a decade. What did we get? "Our sales are down and since our shit don't stink it has to be those filthy piratez! We want even more draconian laws!" which they get. So you see your argument doesn't hold water, because the *.A.As will just trot out some trumped up bullshit piracy numbers and use that as an excuse to get even MORE free money thanks to the taxpayers.

And yeah, 150+ year copyrights is NOTHING but free money from the taxpayers, because it is taxpayers that are having to shell out for movies and music that should have been public domain decades ago. Instead we have congress critters blatantly taking treasonous bribes (BTW did you know there are SIX health care lobbyists for every congress critter ATM? How bad do you think the health care "reform" is gonna screw us with THAT level of bribery going on?) and passing ever more draconian laws.

So steal it, don't steal it, it really doesn't matter as these companies have now been infected with the "too big to fail" mentality. It is the mindset where you are entitled to ever rising profits, no matter the economy or how shitty their product is, and if the don't get those ever rising profits? Well then you are a dirty thief and they'll just bribe the government to take that money from you. So while you idea of protest is nice in theory, in practice it just gives them another bullet point on their PPT they show the congress critters they are bribing about how profits are down so it MUST be pirates. After all their shit never stinks and they are "too big to fail" so it HAS to be anyone other than their own incompetence, didn't you know that?

Comment: Re:Where are the details? (Score 1) 183

by Havokmon (#29672797) Attached to: Massive Phishing Campaign Hits Multiple Email Services

All of the stories seem to be very short on details. How did the scheme work? How were they getting users to their site instead of Hotmail? Was it something stupid, like a spam email with a link? Or was it DNS forgery or something more subtle?

Everyone is reporting that it was a particularly big haul for a phishing campaign, but nobody seems to be reporting what the deal was, or why this was more successful than your typical, run-of-the-mill phishing attack.

I run an email service, and regularly get emails like this:

From: Support@MyService
Subject: Service Upgrade

Please send your password so we can migrate your account to our new servers..

Everytime it happens I block the sender and recipient addresses, and grep the logs to verify nobody fell for it. If I'm quick enough, it doesn't matter, but people have fallen for it before I see the fake email.

Rick

Comment: Re:Well (Score 2, Insightful) 133

by Cytotoxic (#29672079) Attached to: CBS Interactive Sued For Distributing Green Dam

capitalism has spawned the ability for a very small minority to amass a very enormous amount of wealth. These people are not contributing more to the world, are not necessarily smarter, and it is immoral to think that somehow they are worth 10,000 times more than the average human being.

If you believe that your worth and your wealth are the same thing, then there is no hope for you.

The pres of my company makes a modest salary by ceo/pres standards. I will work 20 years at a decent salary (top 10%) for my region, save 20% of my salary a year and it will not equal what he makes in one year! There's something woefully wrong with our system.

By your own logic; what makes you worthy of a salary greater than 90% of your neighbors? Why should you earn more than the unfit, 5'1" dullard who is illiterate in any language who cleans your table at lunchtime? How many years would she have to work to have what you make in a year? How is that fair? Indeed, why should anyone earn more than the minimum wage? Anything more would be unfair, wouldn't it?

Capitalism has given a majority in America the delusion that they too can win the lotto, they too can be the next 10million dollar a year winner but instead they don't realize that they are stuck as economic vassals.

Therein lies the misconception. Those who believe in capitalism don't believe you gain wealth by winning the lotto. You aren't given a prize for being the smartest either. You do it by adding value - not some metaphysical value that adds to your worth as a human being, but value that someone else can see and is willing to pay for. Sometimes that person is very smart, like Wozniak and Jobs, but more often they are just providing a service that a lot of people are willing to pay for. Like the lady who invented those little buttons that people put in their Crocs. I can personally attest that I would never in a million years have created that product - due to the fact that I cannot for the life of me understand why anyone would ever don a pair of Crocs in the first place, let alone adorn it in such a hideous fashion. I would bet that I could best her in a "smarts" contest. You probably could too. But she made a couple of million bucks in her first year in business and you and I are collecting salaries working for someone else. And she deserves every penny of that money, and you and I don't no matter how great we think we are, because she went out there and earned it, and we didn't.

Comment: Re:What realistic choice does ZDnet have? (Score 1) 133

by Jesus_666 (#29671171) Attached to: CBS Interactive Sued For Distributing Green Dam
Yes. That's the point I dried to make - you can't expect the western world proclaiming their displeasure to somehow be relevant to Chinese policy (especially when proclaiming the displeasure is all the western world does). You can tell your peers how to live and when enough people do it but that limits peer pressure's reach to, at most, the people in one country and maybe those neighboring it. Any further and the societies are disjunct enough that their members aren't peers. The only kind of peer pressure that could reach China is national-level peer pressure, which of course doesn't work either.

In short, there's not much we can do to tell the Chinese how to run their country.

Comment: Re:Seems low (Score 1) 272

by JimFive (#29670903) Attached to: 72% of Banks Say Their Employees Committed Fraud

That's what money is -- a convenient way of exchanging limited resources...When the money represents nothing, we may as well be pretending that we have infinite resources at our disposal, at which point one wonders why we're bothering with money at all.

Sort of. Money is (also) a representation of your labor, not just of your goods. Money (in the US) doesn't represent nothing, it represents the effort the laborers add to the economy. While that effort is intangible it isn't "nothing". The money supply is backed by the efforts of the people using that money. Ideally, the money supply should expand such that every product/service produced could be purchased. However, our numbers aren't quite that accurate and it is better to have a little extra money than not enough money so we aim for a small, but measurable amount of inflation.

I also want to mention that gold is also a "fiat" currency. It only has value as money if the parties to the trade declare that it has that value.
--
JimFive

I've got a bad feeling about this.

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