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Comment: Re:Instilling values more important (Score 1) 679

i agree with the stories. Not just good and funny stories, though. Tell her every story you can think of about yourself and your life. She's going to be missing a connection with you. Tell her memories about what you did as a kid with your parents, your friends. Tell her about things that you regret and things that you're proud of.

Comment: Re:someone explain for the ignorant (Score 1) 448

by JimFive (#49096719) Attached to: Credit Card Fraud Could Peak In 2015 As the US Moves To EMV
My recollection is that the card issuers were trying to use withholding chip and pin as leverage to move the liability for fraudulent transactions to the customer. However with the high profile exploits at Target (et al?) they agreed to switch to chip and signature with the liability staying between the merchant, the bank, and the card issuer.
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JimFive

Comment: Re:Dunning Kreuger effect (Score 1) 809

by JimFive (#49050263) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Portion of Developers Are Bad At What They Do?
One of the problems with questions like this, especially out of the blue (that is not as a contextual followup) is that there are many answers depending on the context inside the questioners head. For example: "How does memory work?" Well, do you mean at the physical level? Or from a memory addressing model level, from a C style pointer level, heap vs stack, or just the idea of binary digits?

Likewise with the OP question of "How does public key encryption work?" either the question reduces to the absurdly easy "How do you encrypt a file with PGP?" or it requires a bunch of math that I really don't know. Since I can't believe that someone would ask the first question in an interview for Senior Developer then the answer left is "With a bunch of math I don't know."
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JimFive

Comment: Re:Relevant Expertise (Score 1) 809

by JimFive (#49049945) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Portion of Developers Are Bad At What They Do?
I disagree. If that's an acceptable answer then so is "Click the send encrypted email button in the email client." You do have server integrated encryption don't you? Why is the developer/user even concerned about this? If there's a business need for encrypted email then it should be handled by the infrastructure team and (ideally) not rely on the user to know or care about it.

If you're interviewing for a developer and you want to check into generic domain knowledge ask about Source Code Management and dealing with merge conflicts. And, don't use abbreviations. Just because you know what SCM means doesn't mean that the interviewee is going to pull up the correct reference under stress (and yes, interviewing is stressful).
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JimFive

Comment: Re:Did they ask if they could look it up? (Score 1) 809

by JimFive (#49049875) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Portion of Developers Are Bad At What They Do?

If you would be happy with 'use your public key to send it to you' then it's a perfectly reasonable interview question IMO.

I disagree. If that's an acceptable answer then so is "Click the send encrypted email button in the email client." You do have server integrated encryption don't you? Why is the developer/user even concerned about this? If there's a business need for encrypted email then it should be handled by the infrastructure team and (ideally) not rely on the user to know or care about it.

If you're interviewing for a developer and you want to check into generic domain knowledge ask about Source Code Management and dealing with merge conflicts. And, don't use abbreviations. Just because you know what SCM means doesn't mean that the interviewee is going to pull up the correct reference under stress (and yes, interviewing is stressful).

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JimFive

Comment: Re:The whole idea is crazy (Score 1) 288

by JimFive (#49031903) Attached to: Quantum Equation Suggests Universe Had No Beginning
Yes, you can make analogies and thought experiments that can give a contextual meaning to the phrase: "Act as if it were -100K". However, that doesn't make the question "How does matter behave at -100K?" a meaningful question, because -100K is not a meaningful symbol outside of a metaphorical context. Which brings us back to the original point that it is not meaningful to ask questions like "What happened before there was time?" You can ask "what was before the Big Bang?" only if you do not accept the idea that the space-time universe was created with the Big Bang, in which case you'll have to argue with the theoretical support for that idea.
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JimFive

Comment: Re:The whole idea is crazy (Score 2) 288

by JimFive (#49028443) Attached to: Quantum Equation Suggests Universe Had No Beginning
Temperature is a measure of molecular motion. 0 K is the point at which molecular motion stops. So, while you can make comprehensible sentences around the idea of -100K you can't make meaningful sentences about a state in which there is less than 0 molecular motion. The only way that you can make sense of the sentence is by ignoring the meaning of terms within the sentence.
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JimFive

Comment: Call Center (Score 1) 309

by JimFive (#49019889) Attached to: Samsung SmartTV Customers Warned Personal Conversations May Be Recorded
So, I imagine the 3rd party is like a big call center with a bunch of people in it. When you say the activation phrase, "OK TV" it connects your tv to somebody's terminal and they hear you say your commands "Channel 20, volume medium" and they push the remote control buttons on their terminal for you. (You're call may be recorded for quality assurance purposes, and general hilarity).
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JimFive

Comment: Re: If he actually did all that... (Score 0) 257

by JimFive (#48993141) Attached to: Ross Ulbricht Found Guilty On All 7 Counts In Silk Road Trial

The guy knowingly created a way for [criminals to do business privately]

Did you know that the US Treasury knowingly creates a mechanism for [criminals] to anonymously exchange goods for value? Should all of their employees be convicted?

Ok, so that's a bit silly, but my point is that creating a system that can be used to facilitate crime isn't necessarily the same thing as committing a crime. In this case it appears that he also used his service to commit crimes which makes it less ambiguous.
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JimFive

Comment: Re:Patent Grammar Too (Score 1) 425

by JimFive (#48988863) Attached to: One Man's Quest To Rid Wikipedia of Exactly One Grammatical Mistake

Type "cp -a /etc .".

Because if I didn't include the period, it would be ambiguous. I know so-called "standard English" doesn't like that.

Actually, standard English is fine with that because the "." character inside your quote is not a period. A period is a specific mark used to indicate the end of a sentence. the dot inside your quote, while it looks like a period is actually a symbol representing the current directory and is not a punctuation mark. Likewise, in your previous example, the period is not part of the quote so it goes outside the quote marks.

The point of punctuation is to reduce ambiguity and usage that achieves that is generally correct. I almost always punctuate outside the quotes when quoting and inside the quotes when writing dialog.
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JimFive

Comment: Re: Fascinating (Score 1) 425

by JimFive (#48988613) Attached to: One Man's Quest To Rid Wikipedia of Exactly One Grammatical Mistake
I'm going to slightly disagree about the motivation of drive-by wiki editing. If I'm reading a wikipedia entry and notice a problem (awkward phrasing, incorrect usage, comma usage, etc.) I might fix it, that's kind of the point of a wiki. It isn't, at least in my case, meant to be condescending; it's meant to be helpful.

Also, I've never thought of neither...nor... as archaic it just sounds better to me, so I might fix neither..or if I saw it.
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JimFive

"Well, if you can't believe what you read in a comic book, what *can* you believe?!" -- Bullwinkle J. Moose

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