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Comment Re:If your job can be described by an algorithm... (Score 1) 317

you can't get experience without being a book keeper.

Or, you know, in payroll or Accounts Receivable.

most large companies use Quicken and Excel

Most large companies use an ERP system such as Lawson or Infor, maybe Microsoft Dynamics, and yes, a lot of Excel. They certainly aren't outsourcing their internal audit to India.

Sure, if you want a job at a CPA firm you might have a problem, but every company with more than 30 employees has an accounting department.

ITs big problem with recessions is that it looks (to the MBAs) like an easy place to cut "just one more person", you never notice they're gone until the shit hits the fan.
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JimFive

Comment Re:North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un can vote here (Score 1) 264

So there are two parts to that. A) Federal citizens have the right to vote

Unless denied that right by the state or federal government. Is it a right if it can be abridged by law?

and B) States shall not deny that right based on gender, age, race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Can the government, Federal or State, grant non-citizens suffrage? Yes.
Can the government, Federal or State, remove suffrage from citizens? Yes, as long as they abide by the restrictions of the 15th, 19th and 26th Amendments.

We are a long way from the original topic, which was "What rights does a non-citizen resident have under the constitution?" and the answer is all of them except the right to hold elected office and the "right" to vote. To go even further back on topic, does a non-citizen resident have the right to free movement? And the answer is yes, rights shall not be abridged without due process of law, so until someone has been brought to trial they have the rights associated with being a free person.

Regarding the 6.6% of non-citizens who vote, how many of them are voting legally, that is, how many of them have been granted suffrage by the state in which they reside?

Comment Re:North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un can vote here (Score 1) 264

The only right that the US Constitution grants to specifically to citizens is the right to hold elected office. There is no Federal "right to vote" as there are no Federal Elections. Voting is a State issue. The 14th Amendment specifically allows for States to limit the right to vote but requires that the population used to calculate representation be reduced as well. The 15th Amendment says that a State cannot deny voting rights due to "race, color, or previous condition of servitude" and the 19th extends that protection to women, while the 26th extends that protection to all ages 18 and above.

Neither Habeus Corpus nor any of the rights enumerated in the Bill of Rights are limited to citizens.

Even Demore v. Kim acknowledges that "the Fifth Amendment entitles aliens to due process in deportation proceedings"

Thus, it seems that the only right that citizens have that is not granted to others is the right of entry. Once someone is under the jurisdiction of the US they have constitutional rights.

Aside: I don't recall Obama advocating for voting rights for non-citizens, has he done so?
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JimFive

Comment Re:if only it were so easy (Score 1) 264

Since Rashid isn't a US citizen, it's questionable what Consititutional rights he has in the US

It's not questionable at all actually. He has all the rights granted by his humanity. Constitutional rights apply to everyone under the jurisdiction of the United States, not just citizens.
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JimFive

Comment Re:Meet the new guy (Score 1) 393

Best case, because it's impossible to find the ballot I cast at 7:01 am that morning

Correct.

This isn't correct. At least where I vote you fill out a form with your name and address and the serial number of your (scantron) ballot gets written on the form, so it is possible to dig through the ballots and find the one associated with your name. This might not be possible with electronic voting, however.
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JimFive

Comment Re:Truck Stops, Gas Stations, etc (Score 1) 904

Shortly after pay at the pump became common, I was working with a guy who got pulled over after leaving a gas station because the attendant called the cops thinking he hadn't paid. Having a receipt meant that he just showed it to the cop and was on his way. Without the receipt it would have been a much worse experience.
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JimFive

Comment Re: Negotiating salaries is for the birds. (Score 1) 430

The side that names a number first loses. It is that simple.

Research into the cognitive bias of Anchoring implies that it might be a good idea to be the first side that names a number, just make sure your number is high enough to move their perception of the value of the job without pricing yourself out of their budget.
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JimFive

Comment Re:Straw man arguments? (Score 1) 260

You seem to have missed the point of this article: THERE WAS NO STUDY.

The "researcher" made up a plausible but obviously flawed study and submitted it to a for-profit "science" journal. After passing the review process (e.g. paying $600) the paper was published and then picked up by news outlets which regurgitated the headline summary without looking at the write up enough to notice that it was flawed. The research here had nothing to do with chocolate.
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JimFive

Comment Re:Just stick to the mantra (Score 1) 106

That depends on how the online copies are handled. I use Crashplan on a drive at a friend's house. It has file versioning and files deleted locally are available on the backup. The backups are encrypted and if I have a total drive failure and I can go get the drive and restore locally instead of over the network.

This does not deal with bare drive restores. My current plan is to not worry about it, if I lose a whole drive I'll do a new install and then restore the data files from the backup.
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JimFive

Comment Re:Minimum Wage (Score 1) 1094

"Should" is irrelevant. If someone could control the water supply they could charge $1000/gallon and there is no economic requirement not to.

Goods and services do not have an intrinsic value; their value is determined by scarcity and demand. If dish washers are not scarce, their wages are low and they should be low. The idea that labor or products have some intrinsic, absolute value independent of scarcity or demand is common in fascist and Marxist economics, and it simply doesn't work in practice.

I agree with everything here (when I said "actual value" I meant that colloquially as value to the consumer", sorry about the ambiguity) except "...is common is fascist and Marxist economics..." It always seems to be the pro-capitalists that talk about value as independent from demand. In fact, you do it immediately in the next sentence:

the price is determined by the cost of the inputs plus the value the restaurant adds" [emphasis added]

No, the price is determined as the equilibrium between what the customers are willing to pay and what the vendor is willing to accept. The cost puts a floor on what is profitable to the vendor, but that's it.

If one of the inputs (e.g., clean dishes) becomes more expensive, then the customer will just pay for it.

This presumes that the customer is willing to pay more. The value to the customer of the end product hasn't changed so why would this be true? But, yes, if the amount that the vendor is willing to accept changes then a new equilibrium price will be found and that new price may be higher. It could also be lower (especially if the new minimum wage puts more people on the border line of willingness to pay, in this case price discrimination is the key).

Anyway, all I was pointing out is that there are situations at the minimum wage level where the value to the business of getting the job done is higher than the current cost to the business of getting that job done. While businesses may complain about it, they'll pay the higher wage for those jobs.

(Regarding substitution: I assume that most restaurants already have industrial dishwashers, but those dishwashers don't load themselves.)
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JimFive

Comment Re:Minimum Wage (Score 1) 1094

(While you're at it, also explain why businesses would pay $15/h for a worker who doesn't increase revenue by significantly more than $15 for each hour he works.)

The actual situation may be the opposite of this. Businesses are paying less that $15/h for a worker whose job is worth significantly more than $15 for each hour he works. Why? Because the price (wage of the job) is based on market equilibrium, not the actual value of the end product. Take for example the job of washing dishes in a restaurant. Anybody can do the job but the job is vital to the business. The supply of labor is so high that it is a minimum wage job even though the value to the restaurant of having clean dishes is very high.
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JimFive

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