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Comment: Re: Above Congress? (Score 1) 161 161

Interestingly, HOAs do have the most scope and reach over your life (if you choose to live there). At least as pertains to your home life. The control how long your grass is, where you can park your car on your own property, what kind of toys you can put up for you kids in the yard, who can come over to your house, when and for how long.... they can be very intrusive. They can even have approval over the sale of the house when you decide to leave.

Pretty much just about anything they'd like can be in the HOA contract you agree to when you buy in. I live in HOA central down in south Florida. They are so pervasive that several of those weekend radio shows that are mostly advertisements for professional services are dedicated to HOA legal advice (both for homeowners and for HOA boards). I've not seen that elsewhere, but it seems to be a pretty hot topic around these parts. They have full slates of callers looking for solutions to perceived HOA abuses or homeowners who are resisting HOA mandates. On the few occasions that I've caught a few minutes, the legal experts seem to advise that "the HOA is going to win so just pay up" most of the time.

Comment: Re:Looks like the second stage ruptured (Score 1) 316 316

True. But you do have to not watch such videos to downplay the significance of such atrocities and leave it all as background noise. The same goes for famine in Africa, police abuses here, water contamination in India, AIDS in Africa, etc, etc...

If the ISIL videos were shown on the US and European TV news in heavy rotation, would the pressure on western governments be different?

If the death of Kelly Thomas had been covered by the national news in the same manner as more recent and famous police abuse cases, might the issues at hand be getting a different hearing at the national level? (or Lloyd Smalley and Lillian Weiss, killed in their sleep in a wrong-house drug raid - or any number of others)

The information you take in shapes your opinions and the priorities you set. Living in Greece, only a few hundred miles away from these atrocities and presumably being a Christian - one of the groups targeted by these atrocities - one could see how keeping tabs on the actions of these people would have some personal interest to our Greek Nationalist compatriot.

Comment: Re:Good. However.... (Score 1) 131 131

I have a Samsung S6. It will charge from 10% to fully charged in a little over an hour on a car fast charger while navigating and playing podcasts. I learned this while driving cross-country last week, sharing a charger with 2 other s6 users. 30 hours each way - might not have survived without the podcasts!

That being said, there's no reason that I can see for keeping the batteries so small. Doubling or even tripling the size of the battery wouldn't seriously impact it's ergonomics, and it would allow you to candy crush your way from NY to LA.

Comment: Re:Not relevant? (Score 4, Insightful) 89 89

The guy in charge of selling data center computing as a service thinks that most companies should buy their data center computing from a company like his instead of rolling their own.

And this is surprising or controversial why?

In other news, the guy from Cisco thinks that companies will be looking to Cisco for fast, stable networking. And the guy from Intel thinks that companies will be looking to Intel for power efficient data center solutions.

This doesn't make them luddites.... it makes them salesmen.

Comment: Re: Why? (Score 4, Insightful) 510 510

This is certainly one of the motivations. ,This article provides a lot of good links on the topic.

By combining anti-structuring laws with asset forfeiture the feds can steal most anything they'd like. There have been a lot of stories in recent years about small businesses that make frequent deposits under 10k getting their accounts and even their business siezed.

All without even an allegation of any criminal activity other than making deposits that are below the threshold for reporting. The drug warriors thought they were playing a game of gotcha with the drug kingpins. Nice work, geniuses....

Comment: Where to get the batteries? (Score 1) 116 116

it's unclear exactly how Daimler plans to produce its batteries in a larger-scale energy-storage operation.

Perhaps by writing big checks to battery suppliers like Tesla and Panasonic? And of course from their current supplier for electric vehicles: A123Systems.

Comment: Huge grain of salt (Score 3, Insightful) 82 82

Any time a single device (or drug, or supplement, or treatment) purports to treat a wide variety of seemingly unrelated ailments, your first instinct should be heavy skepticism. Also, when a device purports to work for ailments that have soft endpoints and are amenable to placebo effect, you should evaluate any study carefully. The literature is filled with studies that purport to show promising results, only to collapse when more rigorous methods are applied.

epilepsy, depression, stroke, tinnitus, heart failure, migraines, asthma,

With the exception of stroke and heart failure, this is a list of ailments that are commonly targeted by scam medicine, because they are conditions that will often be self-reported as improved no matter what the intervention. When more rigorous measurements are applied, these effects tend to evaporate.

Let's hope it works, but let's look for some well done studies too.

Comment: Not Wireless (Score 4, Informative) 75 75

This is not exactly wireless... It is not "hard wired' in that you don't plug in a cable. The technology uses a system of electric strips of alternating polarity and a pattern of contact pickups on the device to connect to the strips. It is cool, and should be much better than wireless in terms of efficiency.

Comment: Re:More hoops before travelling through USA (Score 1) 200 200

Keeping advanced weaponry and/or the components thereof out of the hands of people who are championing our destruction has no bearing whatsoever on your liberty. You're creating a false equivalence. Have fun trying to exercise your liberty when you're dead.

Oh, I'd say it is definitely an infringement on individual liberty. It is just that we have decided that the security of the nation supersedes the freedom to sell arms to enemies of the nation.

You have to admit, there's a certain logic to avoiding selling rope to your lynch mob.....

Comment: Re:More hoops before travelling through USA (Score 1) 200 200

You can adjust your W-2 (is that the right form?) so that you don't have any (Federal) income tax withheld. I don't think you can do that for other deductions, though.

You could, but you have to have within 10% of your final tax bill withheld to avoid penalties.

I suppose you intended to tell him he could adjust his employer's withholding to better match his deductions so that his net tax bill would be close to zero. This is sound advice. Nobody should let the government hold their money for free if they can help it.

Comment: Re:Warmth? (Score 1) 286 286

I've been there. At nearly 14k feet it is wear-a-coat cold in the middle of summer on the summit, particularly at sunset (and you really don't want to miss sunset if you make the trek). The air is also very thin. You cannot fly an unpressurized aircraft above that height because of the thin air. FAA regulations require supplemental oxygen to fly above 12,500 feet for more than 30 minutes. Just a short jog uphill will leave you winded, even if you are in really good shape. The visitor's center is at about 9k feet and is much more hospitable.

There is also a notable lack of soil. It is mostly just rocks. Lots and lots of rocks. I really doubt very many people would be running about barefoot on the summit.

Comment: Re:Why is this even a debate? (Score 4, Insightful) 355 355

I know that is the talking point they've decided to go with, but it simply isn't true. I ran the lab for an 8 center trial covering nearly 9,000 cancer patients. We didn't get any personally identifying data - just a number. (unless the nurse of phlebotomist made a mistake and wrote the patient name on the vial). Our couple-million data points were all tied to a number. The number tied back to a list of data about the patient - not including anything personally identifying.

I can't speak for every research situation, but claiming that medical research requires violations of patient confidentiality is specious. It clearly does not in most cases. I suppose if you were studying something rare like breast cancer among post-operative transgendered males you might run into some difficulties with identities being discoverable, but I don't think that's enough to claim the whole thing to be null and void.

Comment: Re:Fluffy the feel good piece (Score 1) 70 70

The example of the nebulizer was ridiculous. You can buy a full nebulizer for home use for under $25. As others have stated here, the pump is just an aquarium pump. The bit that makes it a nebulizer is the little plastic parts that pump the air through the medicine. The "DIY inventor" didn't replace that bit, he just replaced the air pump.

Comment: Re:The alternative is... What, exactly? (Score 2, Interesting) 216 216

I'm pretty shocked how quickly people jump to censoring ideas they don't agree with in this society. The irony of so many people on a public forum like Slashdot advocating for complete censorship of speech they find distasteful or wrong is thick. I would say there is a new mood to suppress opposing ideas, but I think history shows that there is nothing really new about it. Still, The Onion covered this sentiment pretty thoroughly the other day.

Trescott University president Kevin Abrams confirmed Monday that the school encourages a lively exchange of one idea. “As an institution of higher learning, we recognize that it’s inevitable that certain contentious topics will come up from time to time, and when they do, we want to create an atmosphere where both students and faculty feel comfortable voicing a single homogeneous opinion,”

Experiments must be reproducible; they should all fail in the same way.

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