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+ - The CIA Used Artificial Intelligence to Interrogate Its Own Agents in the 80s->

Submitted by ted_pikul
ted_pikul (3845595) writes "Newly declassified documents reveal that, 30 years ago, the CIA pitted one of its own agents against an artificial intelligence interrogator in an attempt to see whether or not the technology would be useful.

The documents, written in 1983, describe a series of experimental tests in which the CIA repeatedly interrogated its own agent using a primitive AI called Analiza. The intelligence on display in the transcript is clearly undeveloped, and seems to contain a mixed bag of predetermined threats made to goad interrogation subjects into spilling their secrets as well as open-ended lines of questioning."

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+ - Beware of what you post on social media!->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "One prevailing problem every modern person on Earth now has in common is a severe loss of privacy and anonymity. There is an astonishing amount of information available to the regular person, but conversely that same regular person is now intimately tied to any organization that seeks information on them. This is a change that has happened so quickly and so profoundly that people from all classes now have to adapt their way of thinking or face the consequences of intimate exposure to unwelcome eyes on social media everywhere. This affects the job market just as powerfully as personal relationships and no one is exempt from being exposed negatively at their own doing.

If you don’t believe it’s already happening, stop reading this and do a search on yourself. How many web services already tell the world all about you? Is it already too late to change your Internet reputation? These are supremely imperative questions, not only for current generations but even more so for the next generation who will either understand this danger or fall victim to it. In simpler terms, whatever trails of pictures, posts, tweets, status updates, or connections you have will say more about who you are than anything else you attempt to portray later. Odds are your next interview will happen before you shake hands with anyone, and you won’t even know it as it’s happening.

Social media sites, surveillance along with an indelible web of background check services can easily specify the type of person you are to anyone who needs to know about your real history. The days of showing up to a job interview and selling a convoluted version of your more hirable self, are over. In fact, more job recruiters today (approximately 94%) than ever before have already mastered the art of using algorithms and Internet screenings that essentially do their hiring for them. Specifically, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn all have much larger impact on a being potentially hired, fired, or even filtered out before an actual conversation takes place. Still, people who want a job must use social media creatively to reverse the risk of losing an opportunity into the possibility of finding one.

Rest of article in the link"

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+ - NSA Director Says Agency is Still Trying to Figure Out Cyber Operations

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "In a keynote speech at a security conference in Washington Tuesday, new NSA Director Mike Rogers emphasized a need to establish behavioral norms for cyber war.

“We’re still trying to work our way through distinguishing the difference between criminal hacking and an act of war,” said Rogers. “If this was easy, we would have figured it out years ago. We have a broad consensus about what constitutes an act of war, what’s an act of defense.”

Rogers went on to explain that we need to better establish standardized terminology and standardized norms like those that exist in the realm of nuclear deterrence. Unfortunately, unlike in traditional national defense, we can not assume that the government will be able to completely protect us against cyber-threats because the threat ecosystem is just too broad."

+ - What to Expect With Windows 9

Submitted by snydeq
snydeq (1272828) writes "Two weeks before the its official unveiling, Woody Leonhard provides a roundup of what to expect and the open questions around Windows 9, given Build 9834 leaks and confirmations springing up all over the Web. The desktop's Start Menu, Metro apps running in resizable windows on the desktop, virtual desktops, Notification Center, and Storage Sense, are among the presumed features in store for Windows 9. Chief among the open questions are the fates of Internet Explorer, Cortana, and the Metro Start Screen. Changes to Windows 9 will provide an inkling of where Nadella will lead Microsoft in the years ahead. What's your litmus test on Windows 9?"

+ - Schizophrenia Is Not a Single Disease->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "New research from Washington University has found that the condition known as schizophrenia is not just a single disease, but instead a collection of eight different disorders. For years, researchers struggled to understand the genetic basis of schizophrenia, but this new method was able to isolate and separate all of the different conditions, each with its own symptoms, which are classified the same way (abstract, full text). "In some patients with hallucinations or delusions, for example, the researchers matched distinct genetic features to patients’ symptoms, demonstrating that specific genetic variations interacted to create a 95 percent certainty of schizophrenia. In another group, they found that disorganized speech and behavior were specifically associated with a set of DNA variations that carried a 100 percent risk of schizophrenia." According to one of the study's authors, "By identifying groups of genetic variations and matching them to symptoms in individual patients, it soon may be possible to target treatments to specific pathways that cause problems.""
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+ - Solar Power-Based Enhanced Oil Recovery Technology->

Submitted by mdsolar
mdsolar (1045926) writes "Royal Dutch Shell has teamed with a sovereign investment fund from Oman to invest $53 million in a company that manufactures solar power equipment designed for increasing oil production. Glasspoint Solar Inc. installs aluminium mirrors near oil fields that concentrate solar radiation on insulated tubes containing water.

The steam generated from heating the water is injected into oil fields to recover heavy crude oil. This concept of enhanced oil recovery involves high pressure injection of hot fluids to recover heavy crude oil. The use of renewable energy like solar power makes great economic sense, as the fuel cost associated with this enhanced oil recovery technology is practically zero.

Shell hopes to employ this technology in its oil fields in Oman. The company hopes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with enhanced oil recovery operations. A large-scale successful implementation of this technology could be a game changer for major consumers like India and the US. Both have substantial oil reserves, but are unable to tap them due to high costs involved in heavy oil recovery."

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+ - KDevelop 4.7.0 Released->

Submitted by KDE Community
KDE Community (3396057) writes "KDevelop team is proud to announce the final release of KDevelop 4.7.0. This release is special, as it marks the end of the KDE4 era for us. As such, KDevelop 4.7.0 comes with a long-term stability guarantee. The CMake support was improved and extended to ensure that all idioms needed for KF5 development are available. The unit test support UI was polished and several bugs fixed. In the same direction, some noteworthy issues with the QtHelp integration were addressed. KDevelop's PHP language support now handles namespaces better and can understand traits aliases. Furthermore, some first fruits of the Google summer of code projects are included in this release. These changes pave the path toward better support for cross compile toolchains. Feature-wise, KDevelop now officially supports the Bazaar (bzr) version control system. On the performance front, it was possible to greatly reduce the memory footprint when loading large projects with several thousand files in KDevelop. Additionally, the startup should now be much faster."
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+ - U.S. Scientists See Long Fight Against Ebola->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Despite recent advances in medicine to treat Ebola, epidemiologists are not hopeful that the outbreak in west Africa will be contained any time soon. Revised models for the disease's spread expect the outbreak to last 12 to 18 months longer, likely infecting hundreds of thousands of people. "While previous outbreaks have been largely confined to rural areas, the current epidemic, the largest ever, has reached densely populated, impoverished cities — including Monrovia, the capital of Liberia — gravely complicating efforts to control the spread of the disease. ... What worries public health officials most is that the epidemic has begun to grow exponentially in Liberia. In the most recent week reported, Liberia had nearly 400 new cases, almost double the number reported the week before. Another grave concern, the W.H.O. said, is 'evidence of substantial underreporting of cases and deaths.' The organization reported on Friday that the number of Ebola cases as of Sept. 7 was 4,366, including 2,218 deaths." Scientists are urging greater public health efforts to slow the exponential trajectory of the disease and bring it back under control."
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+ - Justice Sotomayor Warns Against Tech-Enabled "Orwellian" World->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke on Thursday to faculty and students at the University of Oklahoma City about the privacy perils brought on by modern technology. She warned that the march of technological progress comes with a need to enact privacy protections if we want to avoid living in an "Orwellian world" of constant surveillance. She siad, "There are drones flying over the air randomly that are recording everything that’s happening on what we consider our private property. That type of technology has to stimulate us to think about what is it that we cherish in privacy and how far we want to protect it and from whom. Because people think that it should be protected just against government intrusion, but I don’t like the fact that someone I don’t knowcan pick up, if they’re a private citizen, one of these drones and fly it over my property.""
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+ - Harvard's CompSci intro course boasts record-breaking enrollment->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Harvard College's CS50, the school's Introduction to Computer Science course for undergrads, has attracted about 1 in 8 students this fall — a new record for the school and yet another sign of just how hot this field is becoming for the job-hungry. Overall, 818 undergrads (or 12% of the student body) signed up for the challenging course http://docs.registrar.fas.harv... this semester, and nearly 900 students are registered when factoring in graduate and cross-registered students. Topics included in the syllabus include Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. David Malan, a Harvard CompSci grad, teaches the course."
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+ - After NSA Revelations, Why Aren't More News Organizations Using HTTPS?-> 2

Submitted by ageisp0lis
ageisp0lis (2679663) writes "More than fifteen months after the NSA revelations laid bare the overwhelming scope of online surveillance and fueled the demand for privacy, virtually none of the top news websites—including all those who have reported on the Snowden documents—have adopted the most basic of security measures to protect the integrity of their content and the privacy of their readers: deploying HTTPS by default. That includes The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, ProPublica and Der Spiegel."
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+ - Mozilla 1024-Bit Cert Deprecation Leaves 107,000 Sites Untrusted->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 (2804139) writes "Mozilla has deprecated 1024-bit RSA certificate authority certificates in Firefox 32 and Thunderbird. While there are pluses to the move such as a requirement for longer, stronger keys, at least 107,000 websites will no longer be trusted by Mozilla.

Data from HD Moore's Project Sonar, which indexes more than 20 million websites, found 107,535 sites using a cert signed by what will soon be an untrusted CA certificate. Grouping those 107,000-plus sites by certificate expiration date, the results show that 76,185 certificates had expired as of Aug. 25; of the 65 million certificates in the total scan, 845,599 had expired but were still in use as of Aug. 25, Moore said."

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+ - LLVM 3.5 Brings C++1y Improvements, Unified 64-bit ARM Backend->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "LLVM 3.5 along with Clang 3.5 are now available for download. LLVM 3.5 offers many compiler advancements including a unified 64-bit ARM back-end from the merging of the Apple and community AArch64 back-ends, C++1y/C++1z language additions, self-hosting support of Clang on SPARC64, and various other compiler improvements."
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+ - How a Super-Intelligent AI Could Wipe Out Humanity->

Submitted by the_newsbeagle
the_newsbeagle (2532562) writes "Oxford University futurist Nick Bostrom thinks we're doomed. It's his job to contemplate existential threats to the human species, and he predicts that a super-smart artificial intelligence program will be the end of us.

His new book, Superintelligence, outlines AI takeover scenarios, discusses what might motivate a superintelligent AI, and lays out reasons why the AI’s pursuit of its goals would likely lead to our extinction. This excerpt from the book imagines a situation in which a developing AI lulls humans into complacency before making a "treacherous turn.""

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+ - MS urging people to ignore strong passwords-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft appears to be making a concerted effort to get people to ignore decades of advice on complex passwords. Wired has a piece about Cormac Herley, a Principal Researcher at MS, saying "burdening users with choosing stronger passwords seems like a big waste of effort." http://www.wired.com/2014/08/p... (Original paper "strength above that needed to withstand online guessing is effectively wasted": http://research.microsoft.com/...).
Separately, Roger Grimes, a Principal Analyst at MS, has an opinion piece in Infoworld “Why you don't need long, complex passwords” arguing that password guessers “aren’t even measurable noise in most environments.” http://www.infoworld.com/d/sec..."

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