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Comment: Re:TI-89 is allowed (Score 1) 359

by mister_playboy (#47828715) Attached to: How the Outdated TI-84 Plus Still Holds a Monopoly On Classrooms

It's all about the timeframe when talking about this subject. 89 came out a year later than 86, that alone could be the reason.

In my case it was that our textbooks assumed an 86 so that's what we used. One girl used a hand-me-down 85.

The TI-83/86/89 Jr high/Sr high/College market segmentation proved to be too much, with the 86 eventually being squeezed out.

Comment: Re:Yes we can improve calculators (Score 1) 359

by mister_playboy (#47828619) Attached to: How the Outdated TI-84 Plus Still Holds a Monopoly On Classrooms

There is no reason a calculator cannot offer both RPN and algebraic notation and let the user choose. This isn't like the Querty vs Dvorak keyboard argument.

What's the difference? In both cases the variants are handled entirely in software and thus both should be available.

Comment: Re:TI calculators are not outdated, just overprice (Score 1) 359

by mister_playboy (#47828445) Attached to: How the Outdated TI-84 Plus Still Holds a Monopoly On Classrooms

Since HP basically got out of the calculator business, the HP 50G, which in my opinion is a better calculator anyway, has been available to the public in software form for free. It uses the actual ROM code from the 50G, which HP donated to the public domain.

You have to look around a bit, but versions are available for Mac, PC, and Linux.

Got a link? I'm not seeing any evidence for your claim of public domain'd 50G code.

The closest I found was this uncited part of a Wiki article:
In 2003, the CAS source code of the 49G ROM was released under the LGPL. In addition, this release included an interactive geometry program and some commands to allow compatibility with certain programs written for the newer 49g+ calculator. Due to licensing restrictions, the recompiled ROM cannot be redistributed.

Comment: Re:The Future! (Score 1) 613

by mister_playboy (#47814059) Attached to: You Got Your Windows In My Linux

3 big issues with Unity as I see it:

Unity was pushed out before it was ready, just like pulseaudio, KDE 4 or Slashdat Beta was. People object to have their personal desktop turned into a dev testing lab. Even when/if the bugs are worked out, the bad first experience colors perceptions permanently.

Unity changed lots of aspects of how Ubuntu worked for no particular reason other than an eye towards touch screen usage. This is the same issue people have with Metro.

Unity's introduction also coincided with the "Amazon lens" feature that sent all local searches to Amazon's servers. This sort of invasive monetization is anathema to Linux users and seem like a blatant money grab by Canonical.

Comment: Re:I PC game, and have zero reason to upgrade (Score 1) 98

by mister_playboy (#47810429) Attached to: AMD Releases New Tonga GPU, Lowers 8-core CPU To $229

Many games on the Xbone and a smaller but still non-zero number on PS4 don't even run at 1080p@30hz natively.

This may be rectified as the dev tools improve, but since the hardware is so close to PC-based I doubt we will see as large of an in-gen improvement as we did with older custom hardware consoles.

Comment: Re:gaming rig (Score 1) 98

by mister_playboy (#47807369) Attached to: AMD Releases New Tonga GPU, Lowers 8-core CPU To $229

I'd say just a new GPU would be fine. I use an Asus 770GTX and can play everything I've tried on max settings @1440p, so you should fine @1080p.

The 770 doesn't take advantage of the higher power efficiency parts in the newest Nvidia generation, but the price on some of the variants is quite good. Newegg has a Zotac verison for $275: http://www.newegg.com/Product/...

The 280X can be picked up for a little less, bit it uses more power and is louder from what I have read.

Some people have a great ambition: to build something that will last, at least until they've finished building it.

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