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Comment: Re:Hope they win this case. (Score 1) 453

by shutdown -p now (#48640635) Attached to: Colorado Sued By Neighboring States Over Legal Pot

If they do win, it will set a nice precedent for the Gun control states to force the neighboring lax gun control laws to clean up their act.

It will also set a nice precedent for anti-abortion states to force the neighboring lax abortion laws states to "clean up their act".

And it will set a nice precedent for states that ban gay marriage to force the neighboring states that have gay marriage to "clean up their act".

Careful what you wish for. You might just get it.

Comment: Re:Perspective (Score 2) 68

by Opportunist (#48640605) Attached to: NASA Video Shows What It's Like To Reenter the Earth's Atmosphere

Fuck money. You know when the US made its biggest leaps ahead? When money was pumped into NASA for the moon shot. The 60s where THE decade. World leader in anything technology, and not resting on its "we're #1, why try harder?" spot but gaining enough momentum that it lasted well into the 80s before anyone could come close in any field of technology. Jobs were plentiful and people had money, and they spent that money on more things, creating more jobs. And with the success in space came a really powerful "can do" spirit that drove the economy ahead again. The heroes were the astronauts, people who dared to brave the perils ahead of them in a quest to push the boundaries of humanity and to prove that anything is possible if you just put your mind to it and focus on the goal.

We need that again. I mean, look around you. It's getting hard to remember when the US was #1 in anything, even the Chinese economy is about to take over, if it hasn't already. Jobs are hard to come by and usually they are barely enough to get by, no money to spend, no way to create a job for a hairdresser or a plumber because you can't afford them. And with that drag comes a "no can do" spirit that quenches the last bit of will to compete and succeed. The current american dream isn't to work and climb the ladder, the dream is to buy a ticket and win the lottery.

Not to mention that the heroes of today are idiots in casting shows, people whose biggest dare is to face the verdict of Simon Cowell, with the focus of 5 minutes of fame.

Comment: Re:Supreme Leader (Score 2) 122

by Opportunist (#48640575) Attached to: Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

If I bought one of their rootkit CDs and infected my system, I could see getting a bit miffed, especially after that idiotic statement of how ""Most people, I think, don't even know what a rootkit is, so why should they care about it?" and the "settlement" which essentially said Sony can do whatever they please and don't even get a slap on the wrist.

You see, when the law fails, vigilantes are not far.

Comment: Re:correct if wrong (Score 1) 122

by Opportunist (#48640573) Attached to: Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

You would, and so would I and probably anyone who doesn't think TCP is the Chinese secret service.

But do you think Sony would pay either your or my "asking price"? For what I would command they could easily hire three "admins". They might consider TCP the Chinese secret service and have generally zero clue about security or anything related, but hey, they will just take twice times the time I need to get something going, and with a salary a third of mine, that's still coming out ahead!

That the reason they spend twice as long is that they use copy/paste configuring and try&error as a way to figure out how to get stuff going, leaving ports open and vulnerable behind them in their battle against the system, who cares? It works, doesn't it?

Comment: Then maybe we can finally answer an old question (Score 5, Interesting) 122

by Opportunist (#48640549) Attached to: Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

I think it was Thomas Hesse, back when Sony distributed Rootkits with their CDs their President of Global Digital Business, who said "Most people, I think, don't even know what a rootkit is, so why should they care about it?".

Well, Sony? I'm fairly convinced your execs don't have the foggiest clue about malware but ... do you care about it?

Comment: Re:cis and mi regulation is not "bad" code (Score 1) 11

by Cyberax (#48640241) Attached to: Machine Learning Reveals Genetic Controls
Uhm, we know pretty well that most of the junk is just junk. The recent _high_ estimates of human genome that has some function is about 10% (or about 15% with structural elements). That's a _high_ estimate based on analysis of evolution of genomic sequences.

And it's nothing unusual in the animal world. The difference is even more glaring in plants - a good old Arabidopsis is just 135Mbp and Paris Japonica is 150GBp. That's a difference of three orders of magnitude between plants that have no really special external characteristics! And even Arabidopsis has plenty of junk in its genome.

Comment: Re:Copenhagen interpretation != less complicated (Score 1) 175

by Cyberax (#48635971) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated
Non-locality means transmission of information with faster-than-light speeds (essentially, from future to past). To preserve causality you have to impose limitations on this transfer and these limitations are even more magical (see: "superdeterminism"). See my explanation at http://slashdot.org/comments.p... for an example.

Comment: Re:Copenhagen interpretation != less complicated (Score 1) 175

by Cyberax (#48635907) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated
It doesn't matter. A pilot wave is a type of a hidden state, in such theories particle take a unique way determined by a pilot wave.

Think about it - how can a pilot wave communicate which way a particle must take without going backwards in time (i.e. violating the Lorentz invariance)? Imagine that you have a classic two-slit single electron interference experiment. Suppose that the pilot wave theory is true - in this case a pilot wave interferes with itself and electron chooses one path and ultimately hits a scintillating screen where it's detected as a particle. For an external observer it would look as if a particle interfered with itself. So far so good.

However, let's add another twist - suppose that there's a device (a simple metallic screen) that blocks one of the paths that the electron can take _after_ flying through the slit - this device will cause the interference pattern to disappear (and this was checked by experiments!). However, how would an electron "know" about it when it flies through two slits? Moreover, we can complicate the device by making the screen move and block one path only after electron flies through the slits (it's complicated to do with electrons but it's essentially what happens in the delayed choice quantum eraser experiment). Somehow the pilot wave must provide information to the electron from its future!

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