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Comment Re:And, it cheaper (Score 1) 40

You mean like Apple does with it's silicone-rubber cables that resist cracking...

You forgot to include the obligatory "/s". The rubber shielding on Apple's power cables is anything but crack-resistant.

(Not that I'm suggesting Microsoft's choices don't suck, but don't hold up Apple as an example to aspire to in this instance.)

I think the design goal was to look and feel expensive and trendy. How it wears is a different discussion.

No, the Design Goal was to provide increased flexibility over the typical PVC-jacketed cables, under more environmental conditions (particularly cold).

It was likely inspired by the cables on the soldering stations in the engineering labs at Apple. The base-to-pen cable is often silicone rubber-jacketed, and in my personal experience, they are unusually flexible and supple, tend not to kink nor tangle, and stay that way over time. The exact same characteristics that are exhibited by my MacBook Pro's silicone-rubber (or EDPM)-jacketed AC adapter cables.

Comment Re:Picture is misleading, so is affected system de (Score 1) 40

Only my phones have wallwart-cord-device charging.

Sorry, wrong!

Although this 65W Apple Wall-wart charger (yes, that's an ad for a generic rip-off, but it has the best pictures) for my 2013 MacBook Pro comes with a cable that snaps in, in place of the built-in plug (which also has retractable "blades"), it does indeed function in "Wall-wart" configuration, too.

And yes, it's nice to have the flexibility. At home, I can just plug it into the power strip on my desk, but sometimes it is nice to have the extra 6 ft. of cord that the AC cable provides. Yes, I could just pack an extension cord; but it is nice that Apple's engineers were thinking of the user, and also providing an easy way to "localize" the same adapter (which operates from 100 - 240V AC also) both in Wall-wart and "brick" modes.

Oh, as you can see from the above pics, the Adapter also has little flip-up "horns" that form a cord-winder for the captive output cable (which also has a built-in cable-clip).

Complain all you want about Apple being a "fashion accessory" company; but these little features are all about usability, not "fashion".

Comment Re:What kind of telemetry (Score 2) 114

Actually allow me to correct your correction as MSFT is giving away absolutely nothing as a full version (not the "super duper extra spyware" insider edition) of Windows 10 Requires a legal key from 7 or 8 which currently costs as of this writing between $100-$200 dollars and there are several reports of users trying to go back to Windows 7 after the 30 days to find THEIR KEYS ARE NOW INVALIDATED. I can attest to this being true as I've had to talk to more damned third world MSFT flunkies than I ever cared to thanks to this very issue.

So the REAL cost of Windows 10 is currently between $100- $200 USD, that is the cost of the Windows 7 or 8 key you are giving up by taking this "free OS" and not going for the super duper extra spyware insider edition......sorry but that is the most fucking expensive "free OS" I've ever seen in my life and why we need to kill that "Oh its free you can't complain" bullshit because that is what it is, total bullshit!

Comment Re:And, it cheaper (Score 2) 40

It's cheaper than providing a high-quality cable which isn't as affected by wrapping

You mean like Apple does with it's silicone-rubber cables that resist cracking...

or providing a built in wrapping mechanism

You mean like Apple does on many chargers.

Now cue all the people who yank their charger cables out "by the roots" repeatedly, then complain that the cables eventually fail at the junction of the connector and cable.

Everything has a breaking-point; but obviously Microsoft paid absolutely ZERO attention to both the problem, and what's worse, to the supposed "solution".

Comment Re:Congress is just mad someone is beating them (Score 1) 134

More likely Google and Apple (and Samsung, etc) dumped money into their congress critters to get this to avoid having to produce different phones/OSs for each state...

The government doesn't need nor should they have Backdoors and bans on encryption. Citizens have more rights than the government, and they need to learn that, even if it's the hard way

Actually, the Government has ZERO Rights. The Government has only POWERS. Citizens, OTOH, have both Rights AND Powers.

ALWAYS keep that in mind.

Comment Re:You need an adblocker (Score 1) 52

Do you buy products from every back-alley Web site that offers merchandise for sale? No, probably not. You learn which ones can be trusted. Are there shady sites that try to scam you? Of course. Should we have only one Store where you buy things, to make sure you stay safe? Hardly.

Mobile devices are an exception to the rule, and for very good reason.

Comment Re:Reasons why I don't like the Internet of Things (Score 1) 87

I've had to throw away two expensive Corsair power supplies last year. Two. So it's not just limited to "cheap chinese power supplies". (Corsair is supposed to be US/Taiwan manufacture). I'm cured, anyway. Won't be buying more of their stuff.

That's because you bought a re-labeled Chinese Junk power supply from a MEMORY manufacturer.

Just because a company otherwise good with other products decides that they want to put their name on something they know NOTHING about doesn't transmogrify the re-labeled product into something "Good", too.

Comment Re:You need an adblocker (Score 1) 52

Google IS currently free to do what they want. But should they be?

I'd like to see alternate app stores become available, giving users a real choice. Yes, I know Amazon and Samsung have their own stores, but they are available only to users of their own branded devices. Of course, you can side-load apps, but then you open the door to all kinds of security issues. What I want is alternative stores that are completely integrated. THAT would give us some true competition, and maybe some better rates for developers.

So you want the security of a Walled Garden and the ability to load Apps from every back-alley website, too?

Sorry, doesn't work that way in REAL life.

Comment Re:Maybe it's not profitable? (Score 1) 244

Try Comodo Dragon, which is Chromium without the Google crap baked in, they also have a version of FF called IceDragon if you want the Gecko engine.

I use Dragon on my netbook I use for service calls, we're talking AMD E350 which is a 5 year old lightweight APU, and once it loads its quite snappy and a pleasure to use. Firefox IMHO has just gotten too bloated as of late and really slows down older systems.

Comment Re:Surprised? (Score 1) 571

Nooo the surprising thing is even corporate users cannot disable the spying as this was Windows 10 ENTERPISE, the version that they sell to huge megacorps, and even turning everything to OFF it still called thousands of times!

So this should be more than enough to convince any corp that has to abide by S/OX or HIPPA that Windows 10 has to be verbotten, its as big a risk for data breaches as allowing USB sticks...who would have thought that Windows would go from being a spyware risk to being actual spyware?

Submission + - Bethesda To Unleash The Hounds Of Hell On May 13th, Doom Release Date Confirmed (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: Bethesda and id Software are in the process rebooting the Doom franchise and it seems like it's been in development for ages. When we last visited the upcoming Doom remake, Bethesda had posted a giblet-filled trailer which showed some pretty impressive gameplay visuals, killer hand-to-hand combat and plenty of head stomping. Today, Bethesda clued gamers in on something that Doom fans have been anticipating for years, an actual release date. http://hothardware.com/news/be...">Mark your calendars for May 13th, because that's when Doom will be available for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and of course, the PC platform. Bethesda also dropped a new http://hothardware.com/news/be...">campaign trailer for you to ogle.

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