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Comment: Re:Wrong Question (Score 1) 194

by macs4all (#48428953) Attached to: Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

Actually, a lot of companies have a moral compass, even "evil" ones. I mean, do you consider Apple evil because they sue over patents?

Um, if it makes Apple "evil" to protect their IP from being directly ripped off by well-heeled competitors (cough, Samsung, cough), then I think you need to adjust your definition of "evil".

I mean, if you were the CEO of Apple, what would you have done in that instance? I mean, look at the Techcrunch article with the "Before iPhone" and "After iPhone" Samsung pictures. Tell me you wouldn't have been incensed, probably moved to litigation.

Comment: Re:Capitalism does not reward morality (Score 1) 194

by macs4all (#48427957) Attached to: Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

Morality is for the working class. If you want to succeed in a capitalist economy, it's better to be amoral.

Reminds me of a Book that has been around since the late 1970s (and still available on Amazon, I believe) :

"Why S.O.B.s Succeed And Nice Guys Fail In a Small Business"

No truer words were ever penned.

In fact, when writing physical checks to pay bills was the norm, and based on some ideas from that book, I would regularly fill-in pieces of the MICR OCR field-delimiters at the bottoms of my personal checks to delay their processing by the Federal Reserve Clearinghouse, I know it worked, because I would receive those checks back "re-striped" with new (no doubt manually-generated) OCR strips stuck on the bottoms of the check. It was usually good for a 3 to 5 business-day delay "float", while (I assume) the check got kicked-out of the automatic scanner, and routed to the "manual processing" pile. And, since my account wasn't debited until the check "cleared" this process, I avoided a non-sufficient-funds "bounce" fee, and the payor thought that I had paid "on time" (which I technically had).

I kept waiting to get a nasty letter from my bank or the Fed saying "quit it, or you're going to jail!", but I never did.

Comment: Re:How much longer will Foxconn need Apple? (Score 1) 107

by macs4all (#48419391) Attached to: Nokia's N1 Android Tablet Is Actually a Foxconn Tablet

Apple is not really a technology brand these days

lolwut?

Apple is in the same league: as long as the brand remains premium, it does not matter what the output is or for that matter what their quality is.

Too bad for your theory that Apple remains the top performer and the tops in quality and customer satisfaction.

Comment: Re:How much longer will Foxconn need Apple? (Score 1) 107

by macs4all (#48419111) Attached to: Nokia's N1 Android Tablet Is Actually a Foxconn Tablet

Of course, a big part of it is Apple is able to tweak the software to their needs and spend time doing so. Samsung doesn't have that luxury when they release more than 1 new smartphone a week (56 so far in 2014 alone!) and 1 new tablet every two weeks [arstechnica.com]. Or LG, which released 41 since the start of the year. Versus Apple's 6 or so (4 of which were just minor tweaks of the base model)..

Excuse me, but is anyone holding a gun to either Samsung or LG's proverbial heads, forcing them to throw design after design at the wall to see what sticks? It's like every single prototype that some engineer slaps together, the marketing guys steal right off the bench and put into full production. What maroons!

In fact, in the face of their 60% drop in profits, Samsung just announced they are reigning-in their insane new-model-creation rate, and focusing on "quality" over "quantity".

All I have to say to Samsung is: "Duh". Where EVAR did you get THAT idea...?

Comment: Re:I don't get it... (Score 2) 98

by macs4all (#48386701) Attached to: US Gov't Issues Alert About iOS "Masque Attack" Threat

Yes, you can for sure install untrusted apps on iOS without hacking. I can remember from the top of my head at least three ways. Phones in dev mode (not the problem here), Enterprise certs and beta software distributed through TestFlight.

I believe that the limit on TestFlight is 100 phones, and those have to be added to a "List".

Enterprise Certs are easily determinable and Revokable by Apple.

The system is just about as secure as could reasonably be designed.

Comment: Re:I don't get it... (Score 1) 98

by macs4all (#48386651) Attached to: US Gov't Issues Alert About iOS "Masque Attack" Threat

All of those hoops are removed if the app is signed by an Apple 'enterprise deployment' certificate. Someone anyone can get just by asking.

Bzzzt! Wrong!

You have to be Registered as an "Enterprise" Developer; which is a different level from the regular $99/yr. iOS Dev. Registration.

And since that means these Apps are "signed", it should be about 5 seconds before their Cert. was revoked by Apple.

Comment: Re:I don't get it... (Score 1) 98

by macs4all (#48385861) Attached to: US Gov't Issues Alert About iOS "Masque Attack" Threat

The same kind of popups are shown to the people who install malware to their Windows machines. And yet they just click next-next-next-ok, as the ad banner promised something cool, like free money or pictures of . No matter what your iGod, Steve the great lied to you, the Apple devices are just as vulnerable to stupid users as any device out there.

One question: Is there any reasonable security scheme that can defeat social engineering 100% of the time?

I'm not trolling; I seriously want to know what Apple could have done to prevent this, and still allow for "corporate" apps.

Comment: Re:Dumb idea ... Lots of assumptions .... (Score 1) 693

by macs4all (#48373063) Attached to: US School Installs 'Shooter Detection' System

You act as if mass shootings are something that have existed only in the time that SSRIs have been available. The US saw a number of prominent mass shootings in the 1960s and 1970s. This is not a new problem, though your anecdotal experience consuming contemporary mass media might mislead you to believe it is.

I didn't say that SSRIs were responsible for all school shootings, did I?

But, looking at the history of school shootings in the U.S. (particularly "mass shootings"), you can see an incredible uptick in the 1990s and 2000s.

Prozac (the first SSRI) was first prescribed in 1987.

Now, go back to that "history", and tell me that there isn't a strong possibility of a correlation between the "Rampage" school shootings and the introduction of SSRIs.

People have been mentally ill for millenia. Almost never resulted in school "Rampage" shootings. Kids have had access to guns for centuries. Almost never resulted in school "Rampage" shootings. Kids have been bullied, molested, and otherwise abused by faculty and classmates. Almost never resulted in school "Rampage" shootings.

Yet, SSRIs come on the scene in 1987, and just look at the statistics...

Comment: Re:Dumb idea ... Lots of assumptions .... (Score 1) 693

by macs4all (#48372883) Attached to: US School Installs 'Shooter Detection' System

Long story short; SSRIs are the product of half a century of careful research and not the evil scapegoat you and your preferred cable news channel ignorantly make them out to be.

Then why the Black Box Warning, warning SPECIFICALLY of those side-effects?

Then why does every single television commercial for every single SSRI (including the 'repurposed' ones, like Lyrica and Wellbutrin) contain the same warning about "Suicidal thoughts or actions" (which is part of the same Black Box Warning)?

You said it yourself "...everyone's body chemistry is different so any drug can have adverse effects including but not limited to behavior"

And one of the biggest problems with SSRIs, is that many doctors (particularly those not particularly skilled in mental health matters, but that still have a prescription pad), will, after prescribing the latest SSRI that the cute Pharma Rep. came in and dumped a bunch of samples of, will, after the Patient comes back and says "I don't think this is working, doctor; I feel like I'm not getting any better, or maybe even worse." will, instead of thinking of that Black Box Warning, say "Well, perhaps we need to INCREASE the dose..." Many of them will do that repeatedly, even OVER the max recommended dose, simply because they believe the literature that the Pharma Rep. left with those free samples...

I am very glad that SSRIs worked for you; but they are still far from innocuous drugs, period. Again, see the Black Box Warning.

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken

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