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Comment: Interesting (Score 1) 3

by insanecarbonbasedlif (#49486931) Attached to: Chronicle: New glasses and contacts

The weight difference is interesting. I wonder why they don't include average weight differences between lenses on the site when you're pricing it out? I suppose it is because the difference is so small that it would sell less upgrades. For my son's glasses I worry less about the frames and more about scratch resistance and lens replaceability (browser spellcheck claims that's not a word. Of course it also thinks spellcheck is not a word either, but I believe it's in common enough usage to be a full non-hyphened compound :) ). Of course, he's 7, so hopefully his lens care will get better over time. He hasn't complained about comfort from any of the glasses he's had yet, though he had them from age 2, so he has little non-glasses experience. I'm afraid to ask in case it makes him aware of discomforts he was happily tolerating pre-question.

Comment: Re:Don't ask, don't tell (Score 1) 114

by insanecarbonbasedlif (#49382463) Attached to: SCOTUS: GPS Trackers Are a Form of Search and Seizure

This ruling doesn't even have anything to do with planting a tracking device. It is in regards to an individual who has been convicted of multiple sexual offences who has served his time and is being required by the State of North Carolina to wear a GPS anklet for the rest of his life. He challenged that on 4th amendment grounds. NC argued successfully (at the state level) that this requirement is not a search. The SCOTUS disagreed and sent the case back to NC.

Jeez, RTFA.

Combative much? Let me rearrange your words so you can see how it relates to my original point, and you tell me how I did it wrong, and then I'll let you deal with the fact that you're chasing your own tail while barking at me...

NC argued [that] wear[ing] a GPS anklet ... is not a search

The SCOTUS disagreed

First line of the article:

If the government puts a GPS tracker on you, your car, or any of your personal effects, it counts as a search—and is therefore protected by the Fourth Amendment.

Jeez, what as that about reading the article again?

Comment: Re:I'm one of those engineers... (Score 1) 341

Weird, I've never seen it with an S in there, only as LOC and xK LOC. I though maybe it was something different than the LOC counts I'd seen before. Of course, I've never dealt with projects that were in the millions either, so maybe that's why I've never heard the S variations.

Comment: Re:I'm one of those engineers... (Score 1) 341

Let's take the simplest of all the detection problems. How many lines of code does it take to reliably and safely detect the lane markings of a road? Nobody knows, because nobody has done it yet. Yes, there are prototypes that can handle some sub sets of all cases. The best I've seen handles 90% of the cases. That takes 1 MSLOC and still counting.

What's an emslock?

+ - The first stars in the Universe were invisible

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang writes: You'd think it would be enough to form some stars, and "let there be light" would be a reality. But these stars don't become visible for literally hundreds of millions of years until after they form. It's not that they don't emit light — they do — but rather that the Universe is opaque to that light for up to half a billion years after those stars form. While modern telescopes like Hubble are inherently limited by this fact, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will observe in wavelengths that these dusty particles ought to be transparent to, might be able to finally probe the true light from the very first stars.

The best way to accelerate a Macintoy is at 9.8 meters per second per second.

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