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Comment Re:Duh (Score 1) 671

I would say it's a 90% solution if you have RAID and dual power supplies on separate circuits (this is common in x86 servers these days). Add in dual network connections and you're certainly on the threshold of diminishing returns.

It at the very least reduces the chances of a 3A.M. server down emergency to a very small figure if it's in a decent datacenter with proper electrical backup. I have seen a fair number of power supply failures and a LOT of HD failures, but few machines go down for other failures.

Sure, for only 100x more money you could get a non-stop like solution but few applications justify that outlay.

I know you desperately want to minimize one of systemd's most embarrassing failures, but it just doesn't ring true. I have servers with dual power supplies and RAID (I'm testing brtfs w/ raid1) and I want them to boot in degraded mode if that's what it takes. Systemd is absolutely contraindicated for that application.

Comment Re:Exaggerated again ... (Score 1) 40

If Data and Lore had been configured with different host keys, a whole lot of anguish could have been avoided.

When a signal transmission is detected from Data's quarters, Wesley Crusher arrives to investigate. He finds Lore, now impersonating Data, who explains that he had to incapacitate his brother after being attacked. Wesley is doubtful, but since Lore and Data were misconfigured with identical host keys, he has little option but to pretend to accept the explanation.

Understanding Secure Shell Host Keys

Comment Re:Duh (Score 1) 671

First, Linux isn't restricted to x86 hardware (you knew that right?). Second, HA isn't all or nothing. Very few (very expensive) machines go all in on HA. By far, the most common case is RAID (which is implemented on x86 hardware all the time).

Honestly, the RAID thing is a brown paper bug for systemd that should never have made it into a distro and should have resulted in a crash program to fix that in days. It should not have resulted in claims of "not a bug".

Comment Re:So... (Score 1) 86

Now that the Steam Box is on the market, there is a growing demand for high-end gaming graphics on Linux. That sound you hear is nVidia laughing all the way to the bank.

They've already been there counting and laughing ever since the GTX 970/980 launched. They fell over laughing when they learned that the Fury would be a $500+ card only. Steam boxes would just be the cherry on top.

Comment Re:Wrong way around (Score 1) 671

Better explanation:

sysvinit is widely considered awful by most distro maintainers.

How do we know this? Well, because distro maintainers have been trying to get away from it for years. Even when everything was run from 'init' there have been multiple refactorings of /etc/*.d to try to produce a better start up environment.

At some point, some distributions, notably Ubuntu, switched to an initd replacement called Upstart. Because they were desperate to get away from sysvinit. ChromeOS, possibly the most widely used Desktop GNU/Linux distribution, was also an early adopter of Upstart. Again because it was considered better - more reliable, faster, etc - than horrible old init.

So why are they switching to systemd? Because systemd is considered better than Upstart (which in turn is considered better than sysvinit.) systemd has a better process model, and doesn't ignore required functionality (yes, the same program that configures devices at start up probably should configure USB devices that are plugged in dynamically, and the same processes that configure the network based upon what devices are plugged in at start up should probably configure the network based upon what devices become available later, etc. So yes, this supposed "monolithic" approach is basic common sense.)

Most of those complaining about systemd are actually fighting an argument they lost in 2006, when Upstart became part of Ubuntu 6.10. They've lost it not just in the GNU/Linux world, but also in, say, the Mac OS X world, where sysvinit was unceremoniously ejected back in 2005. Or the Solaris world. etc.

You know, I could understand this if we were actually losing anything by switching to systemd. The desire to remove X11 from *ix, for example, replacing it with a dumb graphics engine with a fraction of the functionality, I think is genuinely a tragedy. We'll lose much of what made *ix what it is if and when Wayland is adopted. But systemd doesn't remove anything. It's fast, efficient, and it fixes huge holes in GNU/Linux, problems we've been aware of since the mid-nineties but haven't had the spine to fix.

It's something to be welcomed.

Comment Re:Systemd "Spec" or RFC? (Score 1) 671

It's a source that nobody knowledgeable appears to have contradicted. Challenging the source is reasonable if the information is untested. If it isn't challenged (and I notice you didn't challenge it) then it gains plausibility.

P.S.: Your attack is an actual ad hominem attack, admittedly against a dubious character. But just because the source is unreliable doesn't mean the information is wrong. And it was presented to a vocal audience with many knowledgeable individuals in it. So I tend to think that systemd does provide root services to users without rights to use those services. And this does sound like a dangerous weakness.

Comment Re:he should know better (Score 2) 220

If you made some kind of public statement and your employer/landlord/bank called you up and said it's not compatible with being an employee/tenant/customer of ours anymore I think most people would call it a free speech issue. Granted, we're not really being consistent because half the time we want to protect dissenting opinions from the wrath of the majority and the other half we want obnoxious and offensive speech to have consequences. Like when Brendan Eich was forced to step down as CEO of Mozilla, was that right or wrong? Some think it was right, that the LGBT community had a right to cause a shit storm. Others think they blatantly silenced an opposing voice by harassing his employer. But the government wasn't involved, so there was no free speech issue right?

Comment Re:Duh (Score 1) 671

And let's not forget that systemd destroys high availability by refusing to mount btrfs degraded if one of the drives fails even if it's set up as RAID1. It refuses to even try the mount commend and drops to the shell (eventually). If you issue the mount manually from there, it mounts right up. They apparently don't know what high availability is all about.

Mommy, what happens to your files when you die?