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Comment: Re:Scientists are generally trusted (Score 1) 193

by lgw (#49794189) Attached to: How a Scientist Fooled Millions With Bizarre Chocolate Diet Claims

More to the point, it's impossible to independently (& personally) verify the data and claims of everything that you would like verified. There's not enough time in the world.

Very true. The rational man realizes this, and doesn't hold strong political opinions on the rest of it. We're all going to be ignorant of most science in the modern world - the time has long passed when the educated man could know all of the scientific knowledge there was. It's important to therefore set arrogance aside, and not try to tell others they're idiots, or force your uneducated opinion on others by law, unless you actually care enough to do the diligence first.

Far too many people mistake fashion for education. If you're going to call others fools for trying to stop the teaching of "evolution" in schools, call them fools because you took the time to understand the science, the counter-arguments, and why a smart, ration person could somehow not believe in evolution. Until you understand the other side, and why it's wrong, stay out of the argument. For the evolution case: if you had a solid biology class, this takes just a few days of reading the talk.origins site. It's not an undue burden, and otherwise arrogance about your uninformed opinion is just idiocy.

For newer fields like the climate change debate, it will take longer to dig up the details, as there isn't a handy website that collects all the pro and con arguments. For climate change, can read through the pro and con sites and understand where they're coming from, understand the Vostok ice core data for perspective, spend time pondering the satellite temperature data, and so on.

For any such issue, treat both sides as intelligent people who are in earnest in their beliefs and not trolling, and read enough to understand how this can be true. When you understand how intelligent people can disagree on the issue, and see where both sides are coming from, then you can act out of knowledge instead of arrogance, and stop polluting the debate with idiocy. If your only basis for argument is "everyone knows the smart people believe X, and the losers believe not-X", well, that's fashion, not knowledge. This pretty much applies to anything being debated politically, BTW, not just the science stuff.

Comment: App Permissions ring hollow (Score 4, Informative) 54

The App Permissions seem to be missing the crucial ability to deny internet access to an app. There are apps where network data connectivity is the problem. Similarly, I wonder if Google will have this permission setting capability on its internal applications. I know that I have a rather tightly worn tin foil hat when it comes to Google and the information they get, but the Xprivacy 'deny' list on my phone is a mile long, and that's with most of their apps frozen or forcibly pulled out, I find that Google's data access on the platform demands a tight leash, leading the 'privacy' and 'permissions' charge to ring of hypocrisy - "we'll make sure that only we have your location" doesn't mean much to me :/

Comment: Re:The future of MIDI (Score 3, Insightful) 56

by Voyager529 (#49793841) Attached to: Android M To Embrace USB Type-C and MIDI

so how about we knock off this feature creep shit already in favor of real battery life.

With that mentality, we'd all be using phones with low-rez, monochrome screens, non-touch (button) interfaces and GPRS data capability. Hell, yeah -- I want my Nokia 8290 back! Best phone ever!

No, with that mentality, we'd have things like

  • Phones that aren't anorexic, instead being willing to be a bit thicker and sport two days' worth of battery life.
  • Phones with physical keyboards. Nothing wrong with Swype or Swiftkey, but if there's a market for pseudo surround sound in a phone, you can't tell me that having a keyboard like the Blackberry Curve or HTC Rhodium doesn't have a maket.
  • Phones with intentionally lower DPI, for people with less-than-perfect eyesight that still want to use their phone.
  • Phones with a better ability to leverage integrated storage
  • Phones with screens designed to be user-replaceable

And that's just off the top of my head of hardware-based changes that end users would be much more likely to want, and would not negatively impact battery life.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 309

by lgw (#49792799) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

That's not C++. That's "C with classes". (No true Scotsman uses C++ that way!) There should really be a new C standard that adds classes, C++-- or something. (BTW, a sure sign that people don't understand C++ is when they argue that the STL is slow.)

It's funny to hear game devs argue that C++ is too abstract, and then in the next breath wonder how they're ever going to get their code to use more than one core. I hope you're not that guy!

I'm in a different world. To me, performance means infinite horizontal scalability. Clarity and performance of work distribution across N machines (for arbitrary N) is where the fun is. Counting cycles and optimizing bytes got boring when machines got fast (a Raspberry Pi blows away the mainframes I started on).

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 309

by lgw (#49792719) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

Only catch exceptions that you can fix is the rule. If you can't actually do something useful about an exception, why would you catch it? There's nothing worse than Pokemon code!

catch(...) make perfect sense in one place - in main(), followed by logging the exception and terminating the process.

The whole point of this entire mindset is to stop checking for errors individually after each call. This lets you eliminate about 2/3s of your lines of code, all boilerplate, and reveal the actual business logic of each function by sweeping away the clutter. But there's a whole crowd of devs who like the clutter. They're not actually very good at coding, but mindless repetition they can do. This mindset is anathema to those guys. RAII without exceptions leaves half the clutter, and so doesn't achieve the goal.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 309

by lgw (#49792635) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

If you don't really need to make systems calls, that's absolutely the right answer IMO. I only favor C++ if I need to do platform-specific messing around with filesystem behavior, or low-level netcode. As soon as you need to do any sort of bit-twiddling, or you care at all about asymptotically-constant-time performance improvements, Java stops being useful (and I always prefer C# to Java where practical - same functionality with half as many lines of code).

I really don't see the point of using C (or C-style coding in C++) outside of kernel-mode stuff, however.

Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 309

by lgw (#49792569) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

A new hire from college is not a "beginner", at least not anywhere I've worked recently. If you choose to interview in C++, you had better know the basic STL classes (string, vector, map) as well. Sure, it's rare to see an interview question that would probe RAII/resource management for entry-level, but knowing that stuff coming in would really help. (We don't care what language someone is good in for an entry level job, but they have to demonstrate some depth in one language of their choice.)

Comment: Re:You shortchange Mad Max 1 -- I want a prequel (Score 1) 219

by swb (#49792495) Attached to: In a 5-star rating scheme, the new Mad Max film ...

I guess it's a question of word choice.

  I think post-apocalyptic means after an apocalyptic event, usually a singular catastrophe like a nuclear war or other major event that has a massive scale and results in multiple and total systemic failures. TRW, MM3, MMFR are all literal post-apocalyptic because they imply or are directly the result of a war.

I think MM1 was "pre-apocalyptic" because there hadn't been a specific singular event yet there was something of a social, political and economic crisis happening concurrent with the storyline. Police service hadn't completely ended, just shrunk in scope and effectiveness. Fuel and other economic goods had become more scarce but not wholly unavailable and the social order was threatened but not totally broken down.

Probably not the greatest terminology, but it kind of seemed to fit better than "critical decline" or something similar, at least in comparison to films that mostly claimed to be sequels which took place after an apocalyptic crisis brought on by the declines seen in the first film.

Comment: Re:This has been played out before... (Score 1) 417

by swb (#49791669) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage

As a person who spends a significant amount of their time planning my fantasy boat, it looks like in terms of equipment selection, 12v and 24v seem to be kings with much less choice once you get to 48vdc.

Now this is mostly for recreational boats up to about 50'. The larger vessels seem to be more inclined to support 24v because they have the space for larger battery arrays and more flexibility to support 12v runs for the many accessories that only run on 12v.

The more run of the mill boats seem to be exclusively 12v because they have less space for battery arrays, their engines are default setup for 12v alternators.

But even when you get into larger trawler-type cruisers, they may have 24v or even 48v arrays, but that mostly seems to be because almost every appliance they have is 115vac and they're just looking for power efficiency when they're not running off the generator anyway.

Comment: Re:"low end" (Score 3, Insightful) 303

by swb (#49791267) Attached to: The Tricky Road Ahead For Android Gets Even Trickier

No, I don't see it as in issue for anybody.

Every iPhone I buy has been used *hard* for two years by two busy professionals working as consultants, and then used continuously as a home telephone (we kept our landline number and ported it to a cell number because it was actually cheaper than the monthly taxfest that is a landline) and then used pretty hard by a 10 year old boy after that.

I may buy a new iPhone every year, but every one of those iPhones gets used for four years and by then it's not even a question of battery that's an issue, but of software and processor obsolescence for any kind of a serious tasks, and I don't think that's really all that different for Android users, either. The only hardware issue I've ever had was a volume up button on a 4S that crapped out six months in, and it was swapped out in store for a replacement phone in 10 minutes.

I really don't understand guys like you that are so angry about people who do buy a phone every year. Admittedly the biggest "feature" add on year on year is mostly CPU/RAM, although the screen size bump with the iPhone 6 Plus has been the main thing this year. It's a fucking tax writeoff for us and even if we bought 2-3 phones individually we'd be looking at upgrades every 18 months or so anyway, so one every 12-14 months doesn't seem outrageous.

I sometimes think the hostility is because you're too broke, too cheap or just flat-out jealous.

A consultant is a person who borrows your watch, tells you what time it is, pockets the watch, and sends you a bill for it.

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