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Comment: Re:How to regulate something that is unregulateabl (Score 1) 49

by pla (#47551827) Attached to: US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation
I wonder how are they going to "regulate" something that is not supposed to be regulate-able?

Simple - They will effectively exclude businesses in their own states from participating in the BitCoin economy.

This won't affect the vast majority of individuals, because they can't stop individuals from buying from vendors in another state; and it won't affect businesses in unregulated states - Well, I take that back - It will benefit businesses operating outside those states that try to regulate cryptocurrencies.

I fully expect, however, that this will end up at the USSC. As much as the asshats in DC have abused the "interstate commerce" clause, this issue actually falls under that particular umbrella.

Comment: Prozac vs. Ethanol, MJ, etc. (Score 1) 328

It's actually a great comparison. Depression, both unipolar and bipolar, is quite common, and self-medication with alcohol and/or marijuana are quite common. One of my coworkers was bipolar and spent some time in the local hospital mental ward after a crisis, and said that most of the people there for alcohol detox were bipolar folks who'd gone off their meds (because meds are boring) and switched back to drinking until it caused them problems. Another coworker who's hypomanic said she used to need a couple of martinis or a joint to unwind in the evenings, but eventually went to a psychiatrist to get some better-tuned meds.

So yeah, some people are alcoholics or stoners because they like being drunk or stoned all the time, but for a lot of them it's really dealing with underlying mood problems that could also be addressed with prozac and its relatives. Cocaine's a bit different, but if you want to be manic-depressive and aren't that way naturally, it's a good substitute.

Comment: Re:Ignorance is no excuse ... (Score 3, Informative) 71

by pla (#47550929) Attached to: Google's Mapping Contest Draws Ire From Indian Government
USA routinely tells google to hide sensitive areas and google complies voluntarily

...With the inherent irony that you can then use that hidden data specifically to find "sensitive" areas you might not have known about (just randomly load highest-zoom tiles until you find one with artificially degraded resolution) - Then pull up the same data at 1m resolution from the USGS quarter quad library.

You want something hidden from space? Build it deep enough underground to hide its IR footprint. Attempting to hide things through censorship works sooo well - Just ask Babs S.

+ - Silicon Valley has created an imaginary staffing shortage->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd (182728) writes "As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages."
Link to Original Source

+ - STEM worker shortage is IT industry fantasy-> 1

Submitted by Tailhook
Tailhook (98486) writes "Ron Hira, professor of public policy at Howard University and Paula Stephan is a professor of economics at Georgia State University; `As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages.' — `there is a remarkable concurrence among a wide range of researchers that there is an ample supply of American workers (native and immigrant, citizen and permanent resident) who are willing and qualified to fill the high-skill jobs in this country. The only real disagreement is whether supply is two or three times larger than the demand.'"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Technical Merit really overrated (Score 1) 603

by drinkypoo (#47549911) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

No... ISA was a pretty shitty bus even in it's day. Compare to Zorro in the Amiga, which was fully plug and play from the outset.

Yeah, hindsight is fun. Since Zorro is four years (and change) newer than the ISA bus, there was plenty of it to go around when it was created.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 65

by cdrudge (#47549357) Attached to: World's Largest Amphibious Aircraft Goes Into Production In China

Why are they building giant amphibious cargo planes today? Who has that need?

Locations that need cargo quickly but can't be timely serviced by road, rail, or conventional aircraft? Perhaps island communities that don't have space for a runway but need things quicker than what a cargo ship could provide.

Comment: Re:Money - the ultimate natural selector (Score 1) 328

by pla (#47549081) Attached to: Suddenly Visible: Illicit Drugs As Part of Silicon Valley Culture
I don't feel a lot of workaholism in that story - ridiculously overpaid unscrupulous douchebag with too much time and money that has saddened and humiliated his family managed to have what looks like plenty of leisure time.

I agree with you about the workaholism angle as complete BS, but I think you go too far with the second half of your statement.

Geeks in general seem to seek out novelty, which as an underlying character trait, makes us good at what we do. Seeking altered states of consciousness, in my experience, just comes with that territory. That doesn't depend solely on having too much money and free time (though the lack of either certainly limits opportunities to get high) - Just how we view the world.


Oh, and this shit is not new at all - been happening in this industry for decades. more noticeable now that a Googler has publicly disgraced himself.

Really? I don't see it as all that disgraceful - He died having a good time, rather than lying in a hospital bed in agony. Good for him! I hope to die as well, someday.

Comment: Re:Price is reasonable - $35, not $90 (Score 1) 52

by cdrudge (#47548955) Attached to: A Router-Based Dev Board That Isn't a Router

He is simply pointing out the great difference between Indiegogo and kickstarter, where in the former if you miss project target funding, you may still keep all funding without delivering anything to funders.

Or in the latter where if you make your project target funding, you may still keep all funding without delivery anything to funders.

Comment: Re:TCO (Score 1) 138

by cdrudge (#47548923) Attached to: Valencia Linux School Distro Saves 36 Million Euro

No, Windows is definitely not needed or desirable in schools.

And then in 99% of entry level interviews in the Real World, the freshly out of school candidate gets screwed over because while they may be equal in every other way, a job that requires use of Word and Excel is going to take the candidate that has Word and Excel experience over the one that doesn't.

Not saying that it's right or fair, just explaining the reality of the situation. My wife just found a job after looking for the better part of 8 months. It's not entry level, but it's not too far from it. She only had to look at probably a 1000 different job posting at that time an a large percentage of them explicitly stated they were looking for someone with Word/Excel/Office experience. Don't have it? You quickly get moved to the top of the stack in the circular file cabinet.

Comment: Re:maybe (Score 1) 452

But nooo, let's not let it go, hurrah, time to rub this in a whole nation's face! said the Jewish Association.

Wah wah wah. Oh no, let's not have this rubbed in our faces. As long as a nation is still producing holocaust deniers, it badly needs some face-rubbing. Nobody really cares if you will feel defensive.

The meat is rotten, but the booze is holding out. Computer translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak."

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