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+ - This Battery Has Lasted 175 Years and No One Knows How->

Submitted by sarahnaomi
sarahnaomi (3948215) writes "There sits, in the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University, a bell that has been ringing, nonstop, for at least 175 years. It's powered by a single battery that was installed in 1840. Researchers would love to know what the battery is made of, but they are afraid that opening the bell would ruin an experiment to see how long it will last.

The bell’s clapper oscillates back and forth constantly and quickly, meaning the Oxford Electric Bell, as it’s called, has rung roughly 10 billion times, according to the university. It's made of what's called a "dry pile," which is one of the first electric batteries. Dry piles were invented by a guy named Giuseppe Zamboni (no relation to the ice resurfacing company) in the early 1800s. They use alternating discs of silver, zinc, sulfur, and other materials to generate low currents of electricity."

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Comment: A Tip for crowdfunding a Board Game (Score 1) 155

by decipher_saint (#48707333) Attached to: Designing the Best Board Game

When you are close to the end of your own play testing phase you need to build multiple prototypes.

If you want to get the word out to people about your game, particularly sites that review games and recommend them to potential crowd funding audience is that you must have betas you can send to people.

And don't underestimate the time required to develop, build and create a beta for your game, in-house playtesting can take months of refinement. Review feedback is going to add a new cycle of changes / testing.

It's a big investment both in time and materials even before you reach out for funding, and after all that you may not be able to reach your goal, so be prepared for that up front.

Comment: Re:Are programmers really this naive? (Score 1) 465

It's worse than just in-yo-face endorsement, it was active incitement to try to turn something actually interesting into yet another contrived "reality" show.

It was easy for them to push peoples' buttons, what was unexpected (and the most interesting part of this whole debacle IMO) is that rather than sit there and be harassed by assholes everybody just walked out.

I hope that Maker Studios learnt something from this experience and keep tight watch on outside "consultants" so that the next time it will stay true to the spirit of what was attempted and make something really worth watching

The gent who wakes up and finds himself a success hasn't been asleep.

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