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Comment: Great for Code Reviews (Score 1) 119

by Maltheus (#46779055) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

We have these at my office. I love them. Health benefits aside, these are ideal for code reviews. People don't have to crouch or drag chairs into an (already too small) cube.

Other benefits include: nobody sneaks up on you, while you're standing, and it helps wake me up after lunch.

That being said though, most people use them in sit down mode and forget to raise them, most of the time. Still, it's wonderful to have the option.

Comment: Re:McArdle is astute (Score 1) 4

by damn_registrars (#46779027) Attached to: Obamacare is Not a Single-Payer Conspiracy [Bloomberg]

No, that suppository arrives with the Clinton Administration. I reckon she's wreckin'.

I certainly hope so, it would be nice for the US to raise to the level of the rest of the industrialized world from our historically barbaric health care "system". American health care is far from #1 in any measure except cost; ours is the most expensive. It's neither logical nor rational.

I couldn't agree with you more, although I don't see any way that any future president in the next several decades will be able to successfully bring about as much as a single payer option for our country, let alone a full single payer system for the entire country. I expect I'll be 6 feet under long before that happens (unless our country itself finally fractures into two (or more) completely separate countries).

For the record, I have been advocating for single payer health care for over two decades. I was advocating for it even before my health insurance tried to force me out of my education and into bankruptcy.

As to Clinton, if she's elected and half as good as her husband the country will be in fine shape.

I certainly hope so. I recall that back in 2008 or so when Hillary was trying to make a run for it, a popular conservative conspiracy theory was that she was going to be elected and then somehow magically subvert the law and resign in a way to make Bill president again. I'm surprised we haven't heard that one come up yet.

Comment: Re:Partial statistics (Score 1) 106

by hairyfeet (#46778719) Attached to: Steam's Most Popular Games

To me the point when HL2 shit the bed is when they pulled a Bioshock Infinite and fell in love with a gimmick...the gravity gun. In HL2 the GG was just another weapon, used in a couple of spots but other than those spots it really wasn't required. What did we get for EP 1? Gravitypaloza. By the time I was being forced to shoot basketballs at striders I was just sick of the stupid gravity gun, just as I got sick of infinite shoving that damned skyhook under my nose going "Isn't this neato"? Sure it was, before you BECAME ANNOYING ABOUT IT!!

As for so many games not played? Bundles, simple as that. You can get so many bundles on Steam that you soon end up with dozens of games and you only have so many hours in the day so...there ya go. Between the big Steam sales and Humble Bundles I probably got a good 50 games in a couple months, just not enough time to play them all before the next killer bundle comes along.

Finally as for Steam being "bloated" on OSX.....ever stop to think that OSX simply isn't very well suited as a gaming platform? Because on Windows you are looking at maybe 60Mb (I have Raptr AND Steam running and barely am using 100Mb) and from what I understand the Steam for Linux also runs quite well, which leaves OSX looking as the culprit from where I sit.

Comment: Re:SCCM (Score 3, Insightful) 198

by Enigma2175 (#46778701) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: System Administrator Vs Change Advisory Board

Yeah, after a couple of weeks of having to run through a few hundred patches at a time (make sure you write at least a page for each patch!) they'll get the hint that this is fucking retarded and back off.

I think and your parent underestimate the ability of committees to do work that is fucking retarded. I can't count the number of fucking retarded processes at my company that people have been happily doing for years.

Comment: Re:This would go over so well on IT (Score 3, Interesting) 119

by thesandtiger (#46778529) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

I do development and I work a standing desk (and for a couple of years did a walking desk when I worked at home). I'm actually vastly more comfortable not just at work now but in the rest of my life since switching:

- issues I had with sciatica went away
- I am in better shape/have more endurance & energy
- I sleep better
- I used to feel like shit if I went on a 10 hour coding binge (sluggish and exhausted) but now I just feel pretty much normal

It's only uncomfortable at first, but once you figure out good shoes to wear, good anti-fatigue mats to use and good posture it's much MUCH more comfortable (at least in my experience) and makes your non-work life better as well.

At my office we have 5 people in our engineering team (some IT, some developers) who use standing desks and a few more who are considering making the switch. The oldest stander is me (42) so it's not just something 20-somethings can do.

Comment: Re:Well it makes sense (Score 1) 731

I completely understand your points, but let me offer a few things:

Shit like this happens to people every single day. Often vastly worse; I volunteered with an organization that sought clemency for people who were wrongly convicted and imprisoned (and in the US that means being subjected to some truly horrific shit). Yet, by and large, despite being completely fucked over by the system and having had years - sometimes decades - of their lives taken away, despite being tortured by beatings, rapes, solitary confinement, these people didn't lose their shit and go on a killing spree. They kept their shit together. My point here is that people get fucked over and there are ways of dealing with it, and sometimes things get handled and sometimes they don't, and you need to move along and get past it.

But, as you say, that takes perspective. Which gets me to my next point: The kid himself may not have perspective, but his parents sure as hell should. Or some other adult. Someone should have sat him down and explained that he was right, the people in power were assholes, and that while he probably is plenty pissed about how it all went down, in the grand scheme of things it's just a run in with assholes, and he's better than that. It is the job of parents not just to teach kids how to not be assholes, but how to deal with the fact that assholes exist and they will try to fuck up your life.

I definitely agree that dealing with bullying needs to be handled better not just because it's the right thing, but because it's an immediate safety issue and letting it keep going perpetuates a culture that accepts it. The problem is that school administrators are short sighted in this country (actually, pretty much everyone involved in public education in this country is extremely short sighted), and they want to maintain control with a minimum amount of hassle.

Comment: Re:McArdle is astute (Score 1) 4

by mcgrew (#46778449) Attached to: Obamacare is Not a Single-Payer Conspiracy [Bloomberg]

However, if there is anything in which I have confidence, it is this administration's commitment to slow, methodical, blame-laden screwings of the lower- and middle-class.

In what way has the lower and middle class been screwed by the present administration? I'll agree that the previous administration was great for the rich and crappy for everyone else, but I posit it's slowly improving.

The lower and middle classes have been getting royally screwed for at least half my life, and I retired earlier this year. The screwings started with Reagan's Capital Gains cuts, which caused an orgy of hostile corporate takeovers leading to layoffs and lowered hours. I was hurt badly when my employer staved off an attempted corporate pirate raid.

No, that suppository arrives with the Clinton Administration. I reckon she's wreckin'.

I certainly hope so, it would be nice for the US to raise to the level of the rest of the industrialized world from our historically barbaric health care "system". American health care is far from #1 in any measure except cost; ours is the most expensive. It's neither logical nor rational.

As to Clinton, if she's elected and half as good as her husband the country will be in fine shape. It would be incredibly hard for her to be anywhere as bad as George Junior, the worst President in my lifetime (AFAIC we've really only had two good Presidents in my lifetime, Eisenhower and Clinton, and as I was very young I could be wrong about Eisenhower but love that interstate highway system, as well as his cautions about a military industrial complex).

I'm more worried about Illinois. Dillard was Chief of Staff under Thompson and Edgar, and Illinois did pretty good until Ryan got in, and it deteriorated worse under Blago. It hasn't gotten much better under Quinn, but unfortunately Dillard lost the primary and the stupid Republicans nominated the only one of the four candidates that would get me to vote for Quinn.

Comment: Re:Rewarding the bullies... (Score 1) 731

Why wouldn't it be foreshadowing if, at some point in the future, the bullied kid in the story got a gun and shot his bullies?

You mean, aside from the fact that 'foreshadowing' refers to a literary device that doesn't apply to real situations?

Because nobody knows the future, which is kind of a requirement of foreshadowing.

Comment: The announcer's delivery! (Score 1) 91

by dpbsmith (#46778359) Attached to: Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

"Viewers today are more likely captivated by the refrigerator-size computers and 1960s hairdos." No, the very first thing that struck me was the once-familiar announcer's "authoritative" style of delivery. Among other things, the voice often drops by about a musical fifth on the last word of the sentence.

This is not only standard for announcers (Edward R. Murrow being one example), but you even hear it in movie dialog.

I keep wanting to know some name for the change. It was not instantaneous, but it seems to me that it occurred over not much more than a decade or so. Walter Cronkite had a transitional voice style--somewhere in between what you hear in this movie and a more natural, conversational delivery such as you hear today. (Or, at least, I hear it as natural and conversational--maybe fifty years from now it will sound mannered and affected, too).

Comment: Standing/Walking desk (Score 1) 119

by thesandtiger (#46778329) Attached to: Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

When I switched from working in an office to working from home for a couple of years, I went to a standing desk and then to a treadmill/walking desk.

Took me about 3 days to get used to standing all the time - as in, able to do it without feeling too much pain in my feet at the end of the day.

The walking desk took about a week to get used to, at first I could only read emails etc. while walking, but after I got used to things I was able to do 4MPH indefinitely while doing basic stuff, and about 2.5MPH while doing stuff that required a bit more precision with a mouse etc. Put it at a 5% incline and it's not a bad workout. My best day was 20 miles.

I wound up losing some weight - 10 lbs. - which wasn't strictly necessary but wasn't a bad thing. My productivity took a hit at the beginning but got back to normal after the first couple of weeks. My energy level went up dramatically after the first month and my general sense of well-being was much improved. Even better, issues I was having with sciatica went away and I would sleep much better.

At my current job I am at a standing desk all day and while it's not nearly as active as my walking desk, it's still working for me.

Some research suggests that it isn't that much better for you (or at all better for you) than a sitting desk, but my personal experience defies that; I'd recommend trying it for a month - commit to it - and see how it works for you.

Comment: Well said. (Score 1) 1

by mcgrew (#46778141) Attached to: Lies, damned lies, and ... oh no, you're going there.

Liars always lie. I think people mistrust statistics because they don't understand statistics, or worse, understand a little, just enough to be dangerous.

I worked with data and statisticians my whole career. I'm not a statistician, but learned a lot about the discipline from working with them. One of my co-workers had written a textbook on the subject that was used in colleges. Very interesting discipline.

Comment: Re:McArdle is astute (Score 1) 4

by damn_registrars (#46777825) Attached to: Obamacare is Not a Single-Payer Conspiracy [Bloomberg]

However, if there is anything in which I have confidence, it is this administration's commitment to slow, methodical, blame-laden screwings of the lower- and middle-class.

Really? My taxes went up less this year than they did under any year of a president from the GOP. I don't agree with many of President Lawnchair's policies (at least, the ones he has actually enacted), but they have hurt less than the ones that were proposed by endorsed candidates from your party.

But we're not getting the National Health Service anytime soon.

No, that suppository arrives with the Clinton Administration.

I see you read the article. Or, at least, you read some part of it. Apparently some parts meant more to you than others, as the article rather plainly lays out how there exists no path from the Health Insurance Industry Bailout Act of 2010 to single payer. How exactly do you see the (hypothetical) Clinton Administration being able to enact a single payer system for all? Why do you see that being in their best interest?

They are, after all, on the same payroll. For them to do something that is against the best interests of the people paying them is generally unwise.

Comment: Re:ask yourself *why* and do the right thing (Score 2) 198

by sjames (#46777661) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: System Administrator Vs Change Advisory Board

What you needed was a CAB CAB to maintain the change procedure process document. And then, of course the CAB CAB CAB to maintain the change procedure document change procedure process document.

They might need to lay off their production people to afford another layer of CAB or two, but that's OK, with the constant change in the change procedure change procedure, none of them knew what they were supposed to be doing anymore anyway,.

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