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Comment: Re:Everyone Must Police their users! (Score 2) 188

First, the DC would not know the number of users. Second, 1.2PB is not that much. It can fit into a single rack, of which a DC may have hundreds.

My guess would be that whoever is suspecting DC personnel does not understand the technology involved. Same as you.

Comment: Re:get to work (Score 1) 307

by gweihir (#49127081) Attached to: Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course

Yeah. If only there was an easy to use end2end encrypted mobile phone application for voice calls that Moxie had been involved in creating.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Indeed. Moxie is quite good. But he is wrong here: GPG/PGP is about as simple as you can be and still offer strong security. It can be put into wrappers for a little decrease in security and some increase to usability, but that is it. In security, you cannot make a hard task simple. That is not possible without massively decreasing security.The same thing happens when you say learning to read and write is too hard. Sure, speech recognition and synthesis does allow some help, but you will never be able to use a pen or a keyboard, and it does not help you at all with deciding what to write and what the meaning of some text is. This is a hard task as well, and cannot be automatized away.

The fact of the matter is that it takes real effort to learn to use encryption securely and that nothing can be done abut that.

Comment: Re:Parents keeping kids away from peanuts? Not rea (Score 1) 240

by gweihir (#49124271) Attached to: Study: Peanut Consumption In Infancy Helps Prevent Peanut Allergy

You are not acting rationally. Your whole posting drips panic. Even for your child, peanuts are hardly a "deadly poison". Sure, the symptoms are spectacular, but the actual risk of death is far lower than you believe. The epi-pen you carry is something you do not do to fight off death frequently, but because it is a low-effort, low-cost precaution that primarily helps against the rather unpleasant effects. It also helps lowering the risk of you killing your family when you drive to the ER, and that risk is actually a real one. But you should have stayed at that party.

Comment: Re:I refute (Score 1) 240

by gweihir (#49124151) Attached to: Study: Peanut Consumption In Infancy Helps Prevent Peanut Allergy

It is fascinating how many people these days claim to have "nearly died" of some allergy. The numbers tell a different story, namely that they in almost all cases do not die. An allergic reaction can give you an experience that feels like dying, but is nowhere near that. Otherwise, death from allergies would be a common cause. It is not.

Here are some prime quotes from Wikipedia: "Currently, anaphylaxis leads to 500–1,000 deaths per year (2.4 per million) in the United States, 20 deaths per year in the United Kingdom (0.33 per million), and 15 deaths per year in Australia (0.64 per million)." and "Death from anaphylaxis is most commonly triggered by medications.".

These death rates are so low as to be irrelevant and most are not caused by food.

In case of injury notify your superior immediately. He'll kiss it and make it better.

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