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Comment don't look down, coyote (Score 1) 210

At this point power consumption matters a heck of a lot more for ubiquity than pure performance gains.

I'm sure the fire-breathing dragster edition of current silicon technology (with a pin count to match) will continue to exist at an upscale price for those willing to pay for it.

That uncomfortable rush in your stomach? It's from clinging to yesterday.

Comment Re:The problem will be lackadaisical programmers (Score 1) 210

The problem is that programmers have gotten lazy (excuse me: "man-power efficient") off of the free speed we've been adding over all of these years. Layers upon layers of abstraction from machine code have made it possible to code in languages which are far removed from the actual code the runs on machines. There may now come a time when efficiency of programming matters to everyone, not just the embedded folks.

Comment A few considerations: (Score 1) 307

In Apple's defense, it does seem reasonably plausible that the biometric sensor widget built into the 'home' button(and quite possibly the cable connecting the home button to the logic board) is a 'trusted' element of the system, in the 'the integrity of the system depends on this part performing as expected and not being malicious' sense of 'trusted'. So, I can see why it would be impossible or prohibitively difficult to keep the biometric authentication feature secure while also allowing random people to swap random hardware in to that part of the system.

However, what is a lot less clear is why(especially when many iDevices, including current-model ones, simply lack this feature entirely) 'security' demands that the entire phone be bricked, rather than just the biometric features flushing any private storage associated with them and leaving the phone usable as though it were a model without that feature. This might involve wiping all locally stored data, if the device encryption keys are tangled up with the biometric authentication feature's private storage; but it should still be able to function as though you had just restored it to defaults.

This also raises the question of whether, with the correct incentives, it is possible to induce authorized repair services to introduce malicious components when doing these repairs, and whether doing so would allow you to extract highly sensitive information. Since Apple-blessed repairs can apparently fix home buttons without destroying the handset, and since Apple's line is that tampering threatens the integrity of the authentication system, this seems like a natural place to try to get your malicious part introduced: much more likely that an authorized repair outfit exists in your jurisdiction than that Apple Inc. does; many more low-level techs you could potentially lean on; and home button repairs are a pretty common service request...

Submission + - NSF breaks new ground in reprimanding authors of flawed Science paper (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Retractions of scientific papers are common. But not this one. The retraction by Science of a 12-year-old paper based on research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) breaks new ground in what a federal agency can require scientists to do to set the record straight—and the role that journals play in weeding out flawed papers.

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